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Hello Everyone,

My name is Olivia and I am currently a senior at USF. I am looking for shadowing opportunities to be able to start accruing my 2000 hours that I would need to accomplish by the time I graduate in order to be accepted into a PA program in 2021. If anyone has or know any opportunities that I may be able to apply to..I would greatly appreciate the referral. I can be contacted though this forum.

Thank you

Olivia N.

 

 

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