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Fair market value per RVU for a PA in general practice?  

  1. 1. Fair market value per RVU for a PA in general practice?

    • $20
      0
    • $25
      0
    • $30
      0
    • $35
      0
    • $40
      0
    • $45
      0
    • $50
      0
    • $55
      0
    • $60
      0


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Negotiating a family practice job in the Mountain West as a new grad, trying to get a feel for a) How much liability insurance I need if I'm not covered under my employer and b) How much reimbursement per RVU I should expect.

 

MedEdge offers a 100k/300k claims-made for pretty cheap but I've been told by some to purchase no less than 1M/3M... Any thoughts?

 

I've also been offered a productivity bonus at $30/RVU. No info on thresholds or other specifics yet. Is $30 fair for family practice? I've heard pediatricans making $40 and orthopedic surgeons making $60/RVU to put it into perspective.

 

Thank you.

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