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https://www.goodrx.com/blog/drugs-going-generic-2018-2019-2020-2021-2022/

Just in case you missed anything.  Some of these aren't going to matter at all (Januvia and its combos) I suspect, but I've been prescribing Tadalafil and Pregabalin like they're all of a sudden actually affordable for my patients.

For those of you in pulm, rheum, or HIV medicine, are some of those upcoming generics going to be game changers?

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I will add a question to yours. Does "going generic" have the same meaning as it once did?  I've seen our (migraine management) meds go generic (eg. dihydroertogamine, sumatriptan), then the manufacturer of the brand drug, enters into an agreement with generic makers, for them  (the generic companies) to not make it and allow the brand manufacturer make the generic for a price that is very close to the original branded drug. So, unlike in the old days, when you would see an 80% + drop in price, I'm skeptical that these changes would make a lot of difference. I hope I'm wrong. For example, Revlamid. It is a drug that I may have to be on. I just listened to Tom Brokaw's (who also has Multiple Myleoma) book and he describes a colleague with MM who retired, losing his private insurance, and suddenly he had to personally pay 100K per year for Revlamid. I suspect  the generic will not be a lot cheaper.

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One of the things I'd like to do at some point is start a not-for-profit drug company, just for the purposes of making such agreemnts moot.

For tadalafil and pregabalin, it's made a huge difference in affordability.  I don't know what the impact would be for smaller footprint drugs.

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5 hours ago, jmj11 said:

I will add a question to yours. Does "going generic" have the same meaning as it once did?  I've seen our (migraine management) meds go generic (eg. dihydroertogamine, sumatriptan), then the manufacturer of the brand drug, enters into an agreement with generic makers, for them  (the generic companies) to not make it and allow the brand manufacturer make the generic for a price that is very close to the original branded drug. So, unlike in the old days, when you would see an 80% + drop in price, I'm skeptical that these changes would make a lot of difference. I hope I'm wrong. For example, Revlamid. It is a drug that I may have to be on. I just listened to Tom Brokaw's (who also has Multiple Myleoma) book and he describes a colleague with MM who retired, losing his private insurance, and suddenly he had to personally pay 100K per year for Revlamid. I suspect  the generic will not be a lot cheaper.

As a PA working in heme/onc I was thrilled to see both thalidomide and lenalidomide on that list (as well as apixaban).  Between insurance and drug assistance programs/grants there are very few instances where we have had to change the treatment plan to avoid the high cost of those medications but I'm hopeful that having generic options will reduce the barriers further.  Maybe it's wishful thinking.  Time will tell.

Edited by MT2PA
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or another of my favorites.... there is only one generic manufacturer so they keep the price artificially elevated because...why not?

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Apixaban going generic will be huge for us hospitalists.  Rivaroxaban, possibly in 2021, will be as well.

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please please please realize pregabalin is addictive and abuseable....

 

We had the opioid problem

now the benzo problem

the developing gaba and pregaba problem.......   

 

Best to keep that one drug to the FDA approved indications.......  (coming from corrections and specialized in patient/php/css/iop addiction treatment....) 

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Excellent point. In my case, I'm dealing with people already on gabapentin and usually opioids for chronic pain, most of whom I've wanted to put on Lyrica for years as less bad than the affordable alternatives.

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