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Was he convicted of a crime?  If no.....it's a big nothing burger.  He's in school so he hasn't lost any privileges.  I would not even report it to the board, but if he is really concerned then consult a lawyer as always.

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1 minute ago, Cideous said:

Was he convicted of a crime?  If no.....it's a big nothing burger.  He's in school so he hasn't lost any privileges.  I would not even report it to the board, but if he is really concerned then consult a lawyer as always.

He was not convicted of a crime at all. He was just "found responsible" by the school based on the "preponderance of evidence" which means more likely than not that he stole his roommates credit card. Its really crap how they can just do that and he got a lawyer during the process who even said it was bogus but since it wasn't a criminal case the lawyer really couldn't do much. The only privilege he lost is his leadership position and he can't travel internationally for his rotations but he is still in school. Nothing criminal ever came about it and he wasn't ever contacted by the police at all. He does have to report it though because although the program director was apparently really supportive of him, he did say that when he applies he will have to report the incident and sanctions to the medical board. I think that is why hes nervous about it.

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He can't travel internationally?  Did he lose his passport in this process or what?

I know nothing of the case other than what you've written, but it sounds like your friend may have some traits to work on. If so, he should use this whole episode to change his life. Taking something when you think no one is looking is not a ticket for success in a career that values integrity.

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On 8/20/2019 at 6:11 PM, UGoLong said:

He can't travel internationally?  Did he lose his passport in this process or what?

I know nothing of the case other than what you've written, but it sounds like your friend may have some traits to work on. If so, he should use this whole episode to change his life. Taking something when you think no one is looking is not a ticket for success in a career that values integrity.provided so he could have 

Edited by coleworld8123

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No offense, this whole thing sounds shady.

Bottom line - don't do stupid things.

I would agree with UGoLong that this person needs to have a Come to Glory moment and make some life changes.

I have no idea what this would do to a PA licensing issue - as a preceptor, educator and employer - I hope this person can overcome this and acts a bit more like a mature, ethical adult on a regular basis.

Folks need to consider their actions BEFORE doing them and grow up a bit more before entering a profession of potentially life altering/ life threatening consequences and responsibilities. 

Good Grief

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22 minutes ago, Reality Check 2 said:

No offense, this whole thing sounds shady.

Bottom line - don't do stupid things.

I would agree with UGoLong that this person needs to have a Come to Glory moment and make some life changes.

I have no idea what this would do to a PA licensing issue - as a preceptor, educator and employer - I hope this person can overcome this and acts a bit more like a mature, ethical adult on a regular basis.

Folks need to consider their actions BEFORE doing them and grow up a bit more before entering a profession of potentially life altering/ life threatening consequences and responsibilities. 

Good Grief

Thanks for your response. I am not sure how it is shady, but I guess everyone is entitled to their own opinion. I agree this is a profession of a mature, ethic adult and integrity is at the basis of this profession. Just trying to see if anyone has been in a similar situation and if this will affect his licensure even though it was not criminal. Genuinely trying to get an answer on if this will affect his licensure, not a lecture on if someone thinks this is shady. 

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It's an academic violation apparently (if he's on probation with restrictions) and these are supposed to be disclosed in your CASPA application, as I recall. I suspect this whole thing is less of a "licensing issue" than it is getting in PA school to begin with. The "I was framed" defense is probably not a particularly fruitful way to overcome that. Hence the "Come to Glory" comment in Reality's comment.

A friend of mine was picked up on a marijuana sale 30 years before he went to PA school but it was something he had to disclose and explain.

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13 minutes ago, UGoLong said:

It's an academic violation apparently (if he's on probation with restrictions) and these are supposed to be disclosed in your CASPA application, as I recall. I suspect this whole thing is less of a "licensing issue" than it is getting in PA school to begin with. The "I was framed" defense is probably not a particularly fruitful way to overcome that. Hence the "Come to Glory" comment in Reality's comment.

A friend of mine was picked up on a marijuana sale 30 years before he went to PA school but it was something he had to disclose and explain.

Thanks for your response. This happened after he was accepted to his PA program so I don't think he had to put anything in CAPSA. His PA program does know though about it and yes I believe it was an academic violation. He is able to stay in PA school and complete it though. I think his worries are getting denied a license whenever he applies for it this year. I don't know if he would use the "I was framed" approach because he has not placed blame. Just certain things about his case suggest that and even his previous lawyer believed so. I don't think he would use that to a licensure agency.  Does that make sense? I just am trying to see if anyone has been in a similar situation so I can give him some advice, that is all. Or if anyone has advice about what to do when he applies for licensure. He is fully going to disclose the event. 

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He has to be honest with the specific questions asked on the license applications.  Some ask if you were ever put on probation or dismissed from the school.  If they ask about probation at the school he has to answer affirmatively If they ask about criminal convictions it does not appear that he does have to admit the incident.  If he was ever charged criminally or arrested and they ask that, he will have to answer specifically.  If he cannot figure out what they are asking he should retain an attorney to ask and receive documentation in a document called an opinion letter from the attorney.   

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2 hours ago, rpackelly said:

He has to be honest with the specific questions asked on the license applications.  Some ask if you were ever put on probation or dismissed from the school.  If they ask about probation at the school he has to answer affirmatively If they ask about criminal convictions it does not appear that he does have to admit the incident.  If he was ever charged criminally or arrested and they ask that, he will have to answer specifically.  If he cannot figure out what they are asking he should retain an attorney to ask and receive documentation in a document called an opinion letter from the attorney.   

thanks for the reply. do you think it will hurt his chances on getting a license? he was not charged or arrest or anything criminally.

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Depends on the questions the Board asks.  I think about 50% ask about academic or professional probation, dismissals from school, etc.  

Almost everyone without a felony or drug/alcohol conviction eventually gets licensed but it generally adds a couple of months to the process.  In California some are awarded an initial probationary license.    If the questions have to be answered “yes” it is helpful to get an attorney to help draft your reply, advise what paperwork regarding the problem must or should be included, etc.  Keep this on file because it will be needed subsequently for privileging, etc.   Some states are more lenient.  The last time I saw a Michigan license application it did not mention professional school probation, etc.  Since this would not show up on a criminal background check, that would not be a problem.  States like Florida and California have pretty extensive questionnaires.  Just go to the Board site in your state and download the application.   The lawyer will say, be rigorously truthful in answering the questions, but do not volunteer information that is not asked.  

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2 hours ago, rpackelly said:

 

Depends on the questions the Board asks.  I think about 50% ask about academic or professional probation, dismissals from school, etc.  

Almost everyone without a felony or drug/alcohol conviction eventually gets licensed but it generally adds a couple of months to the process.  In California some are awarded an initial probationary license.    If the questions have to be answered “yes” it is helpful to get an attorney to help draft your reply, advise what paperwork regarding the problem must or should be included, etc.  Keep this on file because it will be needed subsequently for privileging, etc.   Some states are more lenient.  The last time I saw a Michigan license application it did not mention professional school probation, etc.  Since this would not show up on a criminal background check, that would not be a problem.  States like Florida and California have pretty extensive questionnaires.  Just go to the Board site in your state and download the application.   The lawyer will say, be rigorously truthful in answering the questions, but do not volunteer information that is not asked.  

He downloaded the application and they do ask about it for the state he is trying to get licensed in. he said he talked to an attorney that specializes in this stuff and said he shouldn't have a problem getting his license, it just may take some explaining. Thanks for the help!

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