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I’ve recently been offered a position as a dialysis tech in an outpatient center. I shadowed the other day and the staff seamed friendly. My main duties would be weighing patients, cannulating them and setting up the machines, drawing labs, and monitoring their vitals throughout treatment. This all would be under the supervisions of an RN. I would work 8 and 10 hour shifts. I was hoping someone who has worked as a dialysis tech or knows someone who has could give me feedback about their experiences. I do already have 2 years experience volunteering as an EMT-A on a fairly busy service and plan on continuing to do so.  

 

I have also been invited to interview for a medical assistant position at an urgent care, but the interview is after the deadline to decide if I’m going to accept the dialysis position. 

 

The pros I see in working as a dialysis tech: Getting to know my patients and their cases. Experience in the chronic disease side of medicine. 

 

Cons: It’s could be repetitive work and I would really only learn about kidney disease.

Edited by aa1041557
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I've seen MA jobs that are mostly glorified secretaries.  Dialysis tech would be far better experience than those.  The downside would be how depressing dialysis patients are, for the most part.  The upside would be that if you START PA school really understanding what kidneys actually do and how, you've got a huge leg up on everyone else.

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Tough situation as I see an MA being the better all around experience. But with you being an EMT as well and continuing that, I think the dialysis position would be just fine. The kidneys are one of my favorite organs and one of the most complex, so getting a leg up would be great for you. 

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Hello! I'm currently a dialysis tech and applying to schools now... a majority of my PCE comes from this, and I already have 4 interviews so it must count for something (I hope, lol)

 

It really isn't as repetitive as you'd think- yes, you're essentially doing the same thing procedural thing, but there is so much to learn from the RNs you work with. Of course it won't be like being an EMT, where you truly don't know what you're going to get. However, you really get to know your patients and make connections with them. This job has greatly improved my patient communication skills and helps me recognize problems quickly. I love being a tech and I really will miss my patients when I leave for school. All around, I recommend the job (as long as you can deal with early hours and long, hectic shifts). Feel free to message me and I can answer any more questions for you!  

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