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This may be one of my first posts on this site. I've been a long time lurker since before my education and now find my 7 years in and I think I am being fired for the first time in my life. I have already sent out tons of resumes and have an interview scheduled in a week. I guess I'm looking for maybe just a little hand holding. I really don't know how to handle this situation. I work for a small rural hospital and the CEO is a micromanager to the extreme. I have been suspended, going on my second day, without a clear reasoning only that there has been a complaint made. The first one ever. My SP is very supporting. The only thing he found out was that I made someone feel "uncomfortable". I did my job. I obtained an H&P and ordered appropriate testing. I do have a scribe with me in the room so I at least have that. Apparently said patient went directly from my exam room to the CEO's office and I was "suspended" a few hours later. I was supposed to hear something this afternoon after an "investigation" and my phone has been silent. I'm really at a loss. I know that I'm a good provider I have patients who love and some whom hate me because I tell the truth. Do you think this is something I'm going to need to disclose during my interviews? I would appreciate any wisdom from those who have maybe been in my shoes. 

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If they don't want to conduct a meaningful investigation and are being completely reactionary, then you probably don't want to work there anyway. 

Depending how things work out, you might need to disclose this on future job applications. Not sure how much expense and aggravation it is worth, but if they are going to fire you, you might want to get a lawyer involved. If the situation is a loss, it's always better to resign than to be fired. 

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It's going to be okay.

I've been there, working in a small rural hospital with a low-IQ CEO who ran the hospital into the ground (it didn't have far to go).  Found various reasons to get rid of some of the few providers they had so he could bring in his own.  Physicians pushed back but....well, physicians have given up their power in healthcare systems.

I moved on, got a much better paying job (and I was paid well there!), in a much less toxic work environment.  Even better, I now work with terrific nurses!

Side note:  THIS IS WHY you work so hard for financial independence first, THEN buy the nice car/vacations/big house.  I didn't have to work.  Took about 2 months off (I did work at my PRN job) as I interviewed around and I wasn't stressed about it.

It's going to work out fine.  

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As Boats said it will be ok one way or the other eventually. I have said, somewhat tongue-in-cheek, that you aren't a real PA until you have been fired at least once. I have. It was a scary tough couple of months but it led to me being hired by a good organization and my PA boss becoming one of the best friends I have had in my life. In fact he stood up for me at my wedding and remain friends now some 25 years later. Other good things followed afterwards.

I don't believe all things happen for a reason. I think that is simple minded. I do think bad things can lead to better things and often do if you can persevere. Life either bends you or breaks you and it's mostly your choice which.

Having a plan will make you feel better. It gives you a sense of some control over bad circumstances. Keep interviewing and sending out resumes and network network network. If the opportunity presents leave under your own steam.

Good luck. (You'll be fine)

 

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6 hours ago, Boatswain2PA said:

 

Side note:  THIS IS WHY you work so hard for financial independence first, THEN buy the nice car/vacations/big house.  I didn't have to work.  Took about 2 months off (I did work at my PRN job) as I interviewed around and I wasn't stressed about it.

Boats makes this note on almost all of his posts here, and I'm glad he does.  It has never been more true than in the last 10 years of our profession.  Living from paycheck to paycheck driving the nice car, owning the huge house, sending the kids to super expensive private school is so 1997.  My wife and I are saving like crazy and have been for a while.  We will be downsizing to a house half the size of the one we have, going to one car and reducing eating out by 90% in the next year.  Why?  Financial independence and the ability to weather a storm like the one you are unfortunately facing.  I'm tired of being dependent on 29 year old admins with no clinical training threatening me and other providers because our reviews are just not high enough according to the latest target metric........

Edited by Cideous
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Boats makes this note on almost all of his posts here, and I'm glad he does.  It has never been more true than in the last 10 years of our profession.  Living from paycheck to paycheck driving the nice car, owning the huge house, sending the kids to super expensive private school is so 1997.  My wife and I are saving like crazy and have been for a while.  We will be downsizing to a house half the size of the one we have, going to one car and reducing eating out by 90% in the next year.  Why?  Financial independence and the ability to weather a storm like the one you are unfortunately facing.  I'm tired of being dependent on 29 year old admins with no clinical training threatening me and other providers because our reviews are just not high enough according to the latest target metric........

I was with you till the only 10% eating out. I would starve to death. Financial independence is great. I’ve already dropped my own disability policy and will be dropping the employer one next month since I’ll be out after the first of the year. What a great feeling to know that you have no debt other than revolving monthly fixed expenditures. I even make money annually on using my Costco Visa for everything.

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Thank you all for the words of encouragement. Luckily I am very much on the same page as Boats and would be fine for 6-8 months without employment. However, I hate to see my bank account go down as opposed to up!. I have contacted a lawyer but he didn't feel like he could offer anything unless I would foresee myself being out of work for a long period of time. Again thank you everyone for your kind words. 

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On 6/20/2019 at 9:49 AM, Cideous said:

Boats makes this note on almost all of his posts here, and I'm glad he does.  It has never been more true than in the last 10 years of our profession.  Living from paycheck to paycheck driving the nice car, owning the huge house, sending the kids to super expensive private school is so 1997.  My wife and I are saving like crazy and have been for a while.  We will be downsizing to a house half the size of the one we have, going to one car and reducing eating out by 90% in the next year.  Why?  Financial independence and the ability to weather a storm like the one you are unfortunately facing.  I'm tired of being dependent on 29 year old admins with no clinical training threatening me and other providers because our reviews are just not high enough according to the latest target metric........

THIS. 

 

If you have the knowledge in your back pocket that you will be fine financially without a job lined up next week or even next month, it's gives you all the power and confidence in these kind of corporate med (and now rural) scenarios.

 

Sending good thoughts your way for a new and better job opportunity. Life's too short to be miserable, no matter how high the pay.

Edited by pa-wannabe

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Been fired before myself. It's oddly not uncommon for PAs to get fired. GOOD PAs too. Usually it's administrative or has to do with patient satisfaction, rarely a medical error. Admin will often leverage a minor infraction against someone when firing them. 

In any case, resign if you can. You will be ok. Like others have said always be able to float your boat for 3-6 months in the event of a job loss.

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2 hours ago, BruceBanner said:

In any case, resign if you can.

... and ask what they're going to pay for a no-sue/no-disparage agreement.

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On 6/20/2019 at 7:44 AM, sas5814 said:

I have said, somewhat tongue-in-cheek, that you aren't a real PA until you have been fired at least once....

I'm glad to read this.  Never been fired, but it looks like I am looking right into the barrel of that gun after finding out a few things going on today.  All I will say right now is:

1.  I will NEVER lie to a patient in person or on the phone and tell them to come in just to get that charge, only to pull the rug out from underneath them.  Not going to do it.

2.  Corporate medical ownership is the devil.

3.  I should of starting squirreling money away like a crazy person 15 years ago instead of 5.  #Boatsisright

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On 6/20/2019 at 4:32 PM, kittykatufl said:

Thank you all for the words of encouragement. Luckily I am very much on the same page as Boats and would be fine for 6-8 months without employment. However, I hate to see my bank account go down as opposed to up!. I have contacted a lawyer but he didn't feel like he could offer anything unless I would foresee myself being out of work for a long period of time. Again thank you everyone for your kind words. 

Care to share more about what's going on?

Very glad to hear you are financially secure!

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Update:

I did tearfully resign my position. I am being payed for my final 2 weeks but was not asked to return. I never really got a clear answer other than this person was uncomfortable with the entire office.  Again thank you everyone for your input.

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Sounds like splash damage and you were hit by it.  I would think more could be said, but perhaps they used the old "you can resign or we can fire you" bit.  If you find out more it would be interesting to share.   It would help others in the future that come against the same situation.

 

Edited by NeoTrion

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9 hours ago, kittykatufl said:

Update:

I did tearfully resign my position. I am being payed for my final 2 weeks but was not asked to return. I never really got a clear answer other than this person was uncomfortable with the entire office.  Again thank you everyone for your input.

You apparently worked in a place with poor leadership....not uncommon in healthcare organizations.  I would suggest it's more common than not.

Leadership requires firing people, but in one of two ways.  1) They do something so egregiously wrong that it's a no-brainer to everyone, or 2) after multiple attempts at rectifying a serious problem the person obviously cant/wont overcome they must eventually be let go.

Anything else is poor leadership.

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Firing revenue-producers makes little sense, absent repeated or egregious issues.

Dealing with performance issues is the most basic of management skills.  Well, actually, the most basic is probably "don't overreact" and "take time to hear all sides of the story," neither of which appear to have happened here.  The fact that the OP still doesn't know WHAT the specific complaint was is inane. "Why did you leave that job?" "Someone made a complaint and my admin told me to resign or be fired" "What was the complaint about?" "I honestly have no idea"

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On 6/20/2019 at 7:37 AM, Boatswain2PA said:

with a low-IQ CEO

Seems like the "low-IQ" is practically a job qualification for most C-suite inhabitants.

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