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2019-2020 Application Cycle


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I was at the Oct 25/26 interview. To be honest, I really liked the student panel because it felt real and genuine. I wasn't looking to be further convinced about why I should choose Stanford, but

Just received an interview invite for October 25th and October 26th! SUPER EXCITED! 

Does anyone know the cost of attendance for Stanford? I am looking at the Cost of Attendance form on their website, and I am confused. How many quarters are there? Is there 9 of them? If living on cam

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On 11/18/2019 at 7:04 PM, Pa98173jd said:

Wait, if you were on the waitlist and just got accepted, doesnt that hint that the class has been filled up, someone declined admissions, and they are gathering folk from the waitlist?

Sorry, i didn't mean to be misleading about my previous comment! I had not heard anything before i got called on 11/18, and was wondering before if anyone knew when we would hear about if we were either on a waitlist or rejected!

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I just got a (very nice) rejection email. It was what I had expected after not hearing anything at this point, so it wasn't a surprise. It's nice to know for sure, even though it's a "no." I worked really hard to apply here this cycle, a year earlier than I had planned to, and I am just excited to have another go at it next year with a lot of new experience and coursework. I'm really happy I got as far as I did this time 🙂 Thanks everyone here for sharing your experience along the way, it's been so helpful to have some insight into what's going on. 

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Check out the article in the WSJ from yesterday about debt ratio between the tuition costs/loans and your expected first year salary. Stanford Is definitely too expensive for the program they offer and the cost doesn’t make sense. I suppose if your parents are paying for the program it makes sense but, if you’re taking loans to get through it doesn’t. Another example of the rich getting richer. I’m sick of university programs not being available to everyone because the cost is not reachable for some. 

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4 hours ago, bayareafuturepa said:

I just got a (very nice) rejection email. It was what I had expected after not hearing anything at this point, so it wasn't a surprise. It's nice to know for sure, even though it's a "no." I worked really hard to apply here this cycle, a year earlier than I had planned to, and I am just excited to have another go at it next year with a lot of new experience and coursework. I'm really happy I got as far as I did this time 🙂 Thanks everyone here for sharing your experience along the way, it's been so helpful to have some insight into what's going on. 

Do you mind sharing a few lines? Just trying to see if our rejection letters were personalized because I got a nice one too

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19 hours ago, PAcurious2019 said:

Check out the article in the WSJ from yesterday about debt ratio between the tuition costs/loans and your expected first year salary. Stanford Is definitely too expensive for the program they offer and the cost doesn’t make sense. I suppose if your parents are paying for the program it makes sense but, if you’re taking loans to get through it doesn’t. Another example of the rich getting richer. I’m sick of university programs not being available to everyone because the cost is not reachable for some. 

Hello, 

Are you referencing this: https://www.wsj.com/articles/whats-your-degree-worth-11574294910?mod=searchresults&page=1&pos=6.

I read it. Just describes a website that the Department of ED opened that allows you to see the average first year salary by major and gives an estimated monthly loan payment based off of the average cost. Here is Stanford's page on that website: https://collegescorecard.ed.gov/school/?243744-Stanford-University

Please point me in the right direction as to where you found this info as it related to the PA program. I can't. In fact, this website appears to only have undergrad certificates, associates, and bachelors degrees. While you could extrapolate, I don't think that it is particularly helpful to. 

You bring up a great point though. I have been thinking long and hard about this cost. I ran some numbers. Following the tuition page on the Stanford PA website: http://med.stanford.edu/pa/tuition.html. Using their numbers, so the totals for all 9 quarters and assuming all of that as a loan the total is: $273,432 (assuming 4 quarters on campus and 5 off, they are trying to get subsidized housing for the whole program, but not yet confirmed). Yea thats a lot. Plugging this into a student loan payment calculator on a 10 year loan is gross. It comes out to a monthly loan payment of around $3,041. Thats more than I currently bring home in a month. Yikes. According to salary.com, the average PA salary in San Francisco is $132,958 with most salaries falling above $122,387. Lets assume you make $110,000. Using a take home pay calculator your monthly income would be about $6,100. So if you are effectively paying half your monthly income in student loans. Thats highly frowned upon. I think Dave Ramsey would throw up thinking about it. 

Take a breath. If you look at the tuition page again, the estimated costs they put down are huge. Take the rent row for example. They estimate that on campus housing for 4 quarters will be $20,400. Thats $1,700 a month. Go to their student graduate housing price sheet https://rde-stanford-edu.s3.amazonaws.com/Housing/PDF/2019-20_Grad_RatesChart.pdf. 17 of the 22 housing options offered fall below $20,400 a year with some of them falling well below. Three of the options are about half. They also estimate $8,000 for food, which is $153.85 a week. They estimate $8,300 for personal expenses so car insurance or payments I guess? Moral of the story is there are places to cut costs. If you can get your loan total down to even $250,000 your monthly payment drops to $2,700 a month. If you slum it and pay extra a month, you greatly decrease your interest too. 

So yea. It's going to suck for 10 years. Really suck. But it's not impossible or undoable. For shits and giggles I looked at what it would cost for someone going to medical school that took out $300,000 and did a 3 year family medicine residency. Using averages for residency stipend and first year salary. I used the AAMC calculator, which has a ton of features, of which I understand none, so I tried to do the most basic. It appears that this fake person would pay somewhere between $424-$3,600 (low in residency, high as an attending) a month depending on their income based repayment and length of loan term. Paying on the lower end results in a 16 year repayment with the total including interest ballooning to around $544,000. Average family medicine salary is $231,000. It is not unreasonable to think that a PA with 5yrs experience (About when family medicine docs leave residency) can make above $150,000. I have seen on message boards PAs in the bay area making close to $200,000 in family medicine or urgent care. The earning potential is there. 

All told it is absolutely something to take into account. Speaking for myself, I feel as though the extra costs can be outweighed by the extra things Stanford can offer. These are things they mentioned during the interview. I plan to hold them to the impression they gave and make it worth it. 

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10 hours ago, jds994 said:

Hello, 

Are you referencing this: https://www.wsj.com/articles/whats-your-degree-worth-11574294910?mod=searchresults&page=1&pos=6.

I read it. Just describes a website that the Department of ED opened that allows you to see the average first year salary by major and gives an estimated monthly loan payment based off of the average cost. Here is Stanford's page on that website: https://collegescorecard.ed.gov/school/?243744-Stanford-University

Please point me in the right direction as to where you found this info as it related to the PA program. I can't. In fact, this website appears to only have undergrad certificates, associates, and bachelors degrees. While you could extrapolate, I don't think that it is particularly helpful to. 

You bring up a great point though. I have been thinking long and hard about this cost. I ran some numbers. Following the tuition page on the Stanford PA website: http://med.stanford.edu/pa/tuition.html. Using their numbers, so the totals for all 9 quarters and assuming all of that as a loan the total is: $273,432 (assuming 4 quarters on campus and 5 off, they are trying to get subsidized housing for the whole program, but not yet confirmed). Yea thats a lot. Plugging this into a student loan payment calculator on a 10 year loan is gross. It comes out to a monthly loan payment of around $3,041. Thats more than I currently bring home in a month. Yikes. According to salary.com, the average PA salary in San Francisco is $132,958 with most salaries falling above $122,387. Lets assume you make $110,000. Using a take home pay calculator your monthly income would be about $6,100. So if you are effectively paying half your monthly income in student loans. Thats highly frowned upon. I think Dave Ramsey would throw up thinking about it. 

Take a breath. If you look at the tuition page again, the estimated costs they put down are huge. Take the rent row for example. They estimate that on campus housing for 4 quarters will be $20,400. Thats $1,700 a month. Go to their student graduate housing price sheet https://rde-stanford-edu.s3.amazonaws.com/Housing/PDF/2019-20_Grad_RatesChart.pdf. 17 of the 22 housing options offered fall below $20,400 a year with some of them falling well below. Three of the options are about half. They also estimate $8,000 for food, which is $153.85 a week. They estimate $8,300 for personal expenses so car insurance or payments I guess? Moral of the story is there are places to cut costs. If you can get your loan total down to even $250,000 your monthly payment drops to $2,700 a month. If you slum it and pay extra a month, you greatly decrease your interest too. 

So yea. It's going to suck for 10 years. Really suck. But it's not impossible or undoable. For shits and giggles I looked at what it would cost for someone going to medical school that took out $300,000 and did a 3 year family medicine residency. Using averages for residency stipend and first year salary. I used the AAMC calculator, which has a ton of features, of which I understand none, so I tried to do the most basic. It appears that this fake person would pay somewhere between $424-$3,600 (low in residency, high as an attending) a month depending on their income based repayment and length of loan term. Paying on the lower end results in a 16 year repayment with the total including interest ballooning to around $544,000. Average family medicine salary is $231,000. It is not unreasonable to think that a PA with 5yrs experience (About when family medicine docs leave residency) can make above $150,000. I have seen on message boards PAs in the bay area making close to $200,000 in family medicine or urgent care. The earning potential is there. 

All told it is absolutely something to take into account. Speaking for myself, I feel as though the extra costs can be outweighed by the extra things Stanford can offer. These are things they mentioned during the interview. I plan to hold them to the impression they gave and make it worth it. 

Grad plus loans start right away with huge interest so overall, graduation from this program is much higher than $270k

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