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abysmalgpa

Very low undergrad GPAs with a 4.0 Masters

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I’ll keep it short and sweet:

1) undergrad gpas (cum 2.55/science 2.0)  bio major (young and stupid)

2) Biomedical MS (4.0)

3) 3000+ hours paid hands-on experience (medical scribe)

4) first generation college student/worked through undergrad and grad school

5) currently in the workforce, roughly 10 years removed from undergrad (in a medical based field)

If my odds aren’t 0, what can I do to increase my chances from 0.01 to 0.1?

Thank you. 

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The thing that's going to matter the most here is your overall cumulative GPA and overall science GPA. If those are below the minimums (generally a 3.0), then you will be rejected. You'll need to calculate your GPAs and see where you stand.

Also, most programs will not consider medical scribing to be PCE. It's lower tier clinical experience and you will likely need more direct patient care experience to compensate for your low GPAs.

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Some schools consider the Graduate GPA instead of the cGPA which would benefit you. I am not sure of which schools exactly off of the top of my head except EVMS. However, like previously mentioned, scribing is not seen as PCE in some schools. All in all, do some research to find out which schools are best for you. Your UG GPAs would take a while to raise to a 3.0.

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Generally agree with the above. Unfortunately your UG GPA won't let you even be considered by many programs (auto reject). I spoke with someone on this forum a long time ago who had a similar problem, despite stellar performance for a decade since UG (and really only their freshman semester was the problem). There are just too many people applying and not enough seats, so GPA becomes an absolute filter.

Getting your GPA up to 3.0 would be the biggest deal for sure. It's tricky and individual of course, but I would recommend doing the math and seeing what it would require. If you're willing to give it a go once you know exactly what you have to do, then take a bunch of science/bio/med classes and get an A in every single one. It may sound like a lot, but PA school is a lot. I use to work 84 hours a week for a month straight (that is 12 hours a day 7 days a week), and PA school has been much "harder" than that. i.e. learning is harder than working.

As for scribing, it depends on the program, some are prejudice against it, but some value it (as I do). You just have to read up on the programs you want to apply to. For what is worth, I've been a EMT, CNA, and a scribe, and I found my scribing experience to be the most valuable by far. 

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