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About to blow a gasket: case logs

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I am being credentialed at a number of hospitals belonging to a large system.  I will actually be working for an ER group who has the contract to provide services.  Got a note from contract company that said these hospitals want case logs for the past 24 months.  I kindly explained that isn't something that is typically required beyond surgical residents and a few choice others.  Have had it brought up in the past, and my usual response is accepted.  Not this time.  They wrote back and said they require it.  Guess I am out of a job at the end of this month, since I gave my sixty day notice of resignation from my current position at the beginning of December.

Guess I'll start surfing indeed.com.  Maybe get one of those low testosterone clinic gigs, so I can really throw my career into the effing toilet.

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Any way to pull our logs from your billing department?  I needed to generate a procedure log a few years ago when applying for a promotion, and at that point hadn't kept track of my procedures.  Our billers were able to give me a list of every LP, arthrocentesis, etc. that had been billed in my name; not perfect, but it might get you enough to finish credentialing.

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I really think there should be class action lawsuit against insurance companies over "credentialing." They claim that it is a tool for them to guarantee that the providers taking care of their subscribers are qualified. However, it is the responsibility of each state's  medical board to make sure that the provider is qualified. The insurance companies use it as delay technique that saves them millions in payments. Seriously, I'm not just blowing a gasket, but we need a lawyer who could do that. I sense damage to providers and hospitals is in the billions.

Edited by jmj11
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This happened to me once. I was able to get my old hospital to run a report of all of my patient encounters by age/sex and complaint, and they accepted this. I didn't have procedure logs, but I've never needed procedure logs except for expanded scope stuff (e.g. central lines, etc.). I would definitely start by asking your biller/coder and/or HIM contact if they can pull your case logs for you.

Also, everyone knows credentialing is insanity. Don't get too upset or worry about having a job without talking to the physician/recruiter who hired you first. I can't tell you the number of times HR has asked for some crazy shit and then I got my department head or attending physician to make a phone call and take care of it.

And worst case, contact an attorney. There may be a case where you can sue for lost wages for not telling you of this "undue burden" when they offered you the job.

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The VA wanted logs too. 

They accepted letters from physicians attesting to my skill in a particular procedure and dates.

Also called for billing codes and made a list.

It worked.

At some point just put a chip in my neck and scan stuff in for later.....

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If you're going to sign a contract, make sure it specifies they pay you regardless of credentialing status as long as you maintain national certification and state licensure.

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One of the hospital systems that I’m credentialled in want five MRNs I’ve taken care in the last 6 months of for QA. I keep a copy of my rounding sheets and just pick 5. When I trained in the ED, one of the PAs also kept a similar log. At least that gets you back to something that could be ploughed through for future requests.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

 

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I've got nothing to add other than there is no way I'd be able to obtain said records from my prior experience due to the time interval since I was last in the ED.  ED docs come/go, or as in my case, retire or die.  This makes me appreciate my current gig even more.

Edited by GetMeOuttaThisMess

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I keep track of things like intubations and cardioversions and have done so for years. At a job a few years ago they wanted lots of prior intubations and accepted my paramedic internship run sheets from 1991. 

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while in IR I kept logs, and still have them somewhere...

 

it might not be a insurance company requesting this, hospitals are now requesting this to prove proficiency.  

JACHO is pushing hospitals to keep/prove proficiency of their providers....

 

You should be able to contact insurance companies (pick the biggest 3 plus medicare and Medicaid) and request your past 3 years billings for certain codes or something like that - it is you UPIN after all...

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56 minutes ago, ventana said:

while in IR I kept logs, and still have them somewhere...

 

it might not be a insurance company requesting this, hospitals are now requesting this to prove proficiency.  

JACHO is pushing hospitals to keep/prove proficiency of their providers....

 

You should be able to contact insurance companies (pick the biggest 3 plus medicare and Medicaid) and request your past 3 years billings for certain codes or something like that - it is you UPIN after all...

 

I have a few 5 star google reviews...I should be good, right?    😉 

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18 minutes ago, lemurcatta said:

Is this something we should be tracking as a Pa student? Like procedures done? 

Absolutely and your program is doing you a disservice if they haven't given you this advice.

You very well may be asked to provide this to employers especially as a new grad and it can be the difference between getting a job offer or being turned down.  I had several classmates going into ED work asked to provide logs as part of their application/hiring process.

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24 minutes ago, lemurcatta said:

Is this something we should be tracking as a Pa student? Like procedures done? 

Yes, absolutely.  I kept track of all bedside procedures and surgical cases as a student, and I still keep track of them.  Don't you have to log this information as a student anyways?

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As a student we are required to log every patient encounter. It can be a bit tedious at times, but certainly worth the time and effort. 

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Thanks. I’m not in the clinical year yet so I didn’t know. But good to know that I should be saving these things. 

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In my 2011-12 clinicals, I logged everything into Typhon very meticulously.  Before I left my PA program, I got a data dump of every. single. encounter.  Still have it.  I spent a couple of hundred hours logging everything in, you better believe I still have it...

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I've been through EM credentialing at 2 different hospital chains within the past year.  Both wanted procedure logs.  I got them from the quality department at the hospital I was working at at the time.  As others have said, this is a common request by hospitals.  Your current hospital(s) should be able to run a report fairly easily for you.  I keep scanned copies on my PC so I can email them off as needed.

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