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PKundargi

PA School choice affecting future career

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Hello,

I have committed to a PA school starting in January 2019. I was comfortable with my choice until the last few weeks I have been very concerned that I should reapply - even though it is 3 months into the application cycle- because the school I have accepted a position at is currently on probation status. The program did explain this at the interview, however now that I have had a few months to think about it I am growing nervous that I should wait and apply again to get into a fully accredited program. The program has hired consultants to improve on the issues that caused the accreditation problem. I am hoping it will be accredited, but truly it would not affect my class, rather the class after mine.

If I can get any feedback whether the specific program/school you attend affects where you get a job or how others look at your application I would truly truly appreciate it. I am not sure if my hesitancy is valid or not.

 

Thanks

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You can take your boards if you enrolled while the program is on probation. The real question is WHY they are. If it is because they have poor rotations or some other academic issue, you may have trouble when you get a job, or the rotations may not be good enough to develop your skills or let you make connections in your job search.

You need to dig into why they are on probation. They should be able to tell you and you can also look at the NCCPA website.

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I second what UGoLong said. Find out why they are on probation. My program is currently on probation, but I don't think it affects my learning. Probation status can be an indicator that something is terribly wrong with the program and it's leadership or it can also be something very benign. 

 

How much did you enjoy the program when you interviewed? Did the program seem well organized? Did the faculty interact with each other and it's students well? Did the program ever discuss it's own faults? The last one is super important because any program who doesn't understand and express it's own flaws is problem severely unaware of them. 

 

You can always apply and see if you get in else where and then give up your seat. BUT, I would not enroll in the program and drop out and "transfer" during the semester, as this screws someone else out of that seat. 

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