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Hello!

I'm currently a PA-S2 at a 33 month program and about to soon go on rotations. From the start, I knew I wanted to go into surgery, it was just deciding which subspecialty I wanted to go into. After doing a lot of research and searching through the forums, I have a couple of programs in mind that sound absolutely amazing, one of them being the Yale program. Does anyone who have gone through a surgical residency or know people who have any insight on what kind of applicants they are looking for? From what I've gathered from posts on ER residencies, ADCOMS look at: 

- GPA 

- LORs 

- General interest in the specialty: prior experience, rotations during clinical year 

- Personal Statement and the interview

Is it fair to say it is similar to what surgical residency programs are looking for? Fortunately, my program is contracted with Norwalk Hospital at Yale where the residency is located and I am definitely will be rotating through there for my general surgery rotation in the coming months. Thanks again for all your advice! ?

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