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Supervisor Refuses to Write Recommendation Because It Shows Favoritism


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Hi all,

I am currently applying to PA school. I have worked as a CNA for five months now with the same company. I had always hoped that my charge nurse could write me a letter of recommendation. Today, I asked the two charge nurses that I know. They both said that they could not write one because of company policy. When I ask for the reasoning, they said that to write a letter of recommendation would mean favoritism towards me as an employee.  I cannot say how disappointed I am with their response. I asked other coworkers, and some have had the same experience with them. My question is what I should do at this point? Have any of you ever ran into this situation before? 

Edited by metroT
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25 minutes ago, metroT said:

Hi all,

I am currently applying to PA school. I have worked as a CNA for five months now with the same company. I had always hoped that my charge nurse could write me a letter of recommendation. Today, I asked the two charge nurses that I know. They both said that they could not write one because of company policy. When I ask for the reasoning, they said that to write a letter of recommendation would mean favoritism towards me as an employee.  I cannot say I disappointed I am with their response. I asked other coworkers, and some have had the same experience with them. My question is what I should do at this point? Have any of you ever ran into this situation before? 

Have you been working with the same LPNs/RNs consistently over those past few months? It's a bummer the charge nurses won't do it, but seek out other individuals. What about your nursing supervisor? If all else fails, find a new job. 

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10 minutes ago, Diggy said:

Have you been working with the same LPNs/RNs consistently over those past few months? It's a bummer the charge nurses won't do it, but seek out other individuals. What about your nursing supervisor? If all else fails, find a new job. 

I have an RN that will be willing to write a LOR on my behalf. But it seems that most schools want a "clinical supervisor," to write one of the three required LORs. Can an RN be counted as my supervisor? Will it put my application in jeopardy? 

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1 minute ago, metroT said:

I have an RN that will be willing to write a LOR on my behalf. But it seems that most schools want a "clinical supervisor," to write one of the three required LORs. Can an RN be counted as my supervisor? Will it put my application in jeopardy? 

Technically the primary nurse(s) you're assigned to is your supervising RN for that shift just as the charge nurse is. Is there nurse supervisor on your floor that the charge nurse reports to? I would also reach out to the school that requires a supervisor's LOR.  

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1 minute ago, Diggy said:

Technically the primary nurse(s) you're assigned to is your supervising RN for that shift just as the charge nurse is. Is there nurse supervisor on your floor that the charge nurse reports to? I would also reach out to the school that requires a supervisor's LOR.  

There is a clinical director that is the supervisor of the entire floor. I am going to meet with her the next time I work. At this point, I am trying to figure out if it is a company-wide policy or something that the old director adopted.

Nevertheless, it is shocking to find out now. I don't think I would have taken this job if they make it clear to me that a letter was out of the question regardless of my performance. But at this same time, I don't want to ask for the letter before I had time to build rapport. 

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Guest TopShotta

Honestly I would just go ask your Nurse Manager, or Director of Nursing. They should have more experience writing LOR. I know it can be scary but it would be better than a charge nurse. Whats the worst that could happen I mean you already got a no from your charge nurse. I would just go even higher. 

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I would go with UGoLong's advice of not pushing the task on someone who won't write it.  

I've posted this in one other thread but I am in my first week of PA School. We were discussing professionalism. These same professors also go through my program's applications. They mentioned how scary it is the frequency they get letters of rec for applicants that state so and so applicant does not deserve to be in PA school. So, even if it isn't company policy do not force them to write your letters. You would literally be wasting money applying if this were to happen to you. 

The person writing your letter of rec should agree to do so with enthusiasm. That's a good sign.

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