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Hi Everyone,

I noticed there was no thread for this yet so I thought I would get it started. Good luck!

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This is my first time applying and I am really scared if I'll get in:

Overall GPA: 3.3

Science GPA: 3.12

GRE : 300

HCE: Over 2000 hours as a medical assistant and PA shadowing around 150 hours

LOR: Orthopedic surgeon, PA (alumna), and professor

Personal statement: Very personal and positive reviews by many

good chance or don't bother?

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9 minutes ago, fadreana said:

This is my first time applying and I am really scared if I'll get in:

Overall GPA: 3.3

Science GPA: 3.12

GRE : 300

HCE: Over 2000 hours as a medical assistant and PA shadowing around 150 hours

LOR: Orthopedic surgeon, PA (alumna), and professor

Personal statement: Very personal and positive reviews by many

good chance or don't bother?

My stats are similar to yours and it's my first time applying. I think you should definitely apply! I feel the same way about my applications and its very nerve racking. I submitted two of mine last week it has been verified and under review for South University.

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10 hours ago, aspiringpastudent615 said:

Has anyone heard anything about interviews? I know the program in Savannah is starting to send out invites for interviews, but I have not heard anything about the program in Tampa. 

Not sure. I checked last years forum and it looked like they started sending out interviews around this time. Fingers crossed for everyone, I hope you get an interview!

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Haven't heard from them yet, but I did hear back from Albany Medical College already so it's only a matter if time!

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I got a request to take the CASper test today from South University. Did anyone know of this requirement during the application or do they send you the request after you submit?

Cheers

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13 hours ago, ZuluSierra said:

What test is that? I’ve never heard of it

Its a new screening tool I've seen some school require. Situational based and a few prompts after a scenario is given. Obviously South University is requiring it. Here is the link for more information https://takecasper.com/aboutcasper/ 

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23 hours ago, CHACHEE said:

Its a new screening tool I've seen some school require. Situational based and a few prompts after a scenario is given. Obviously South University is requiring it. Here is the link for more information https://takecasper.com/aboutcasper/ 

I haven’t heard about this either, South University Tampa sent you a link to this? 

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They sent me an emails asking me to complete the test - that was 5/29 and I scheduled it that day but the next available test was 6/3. 

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I received an email today stating my application is under review. I did not receive anything regarding CASper test. I did however take it this past weekend for another school I applied to.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I received an email today stating my application is under review. I did not receive anything regarding CASper test. I did however take it this past weekend for another school I applied to.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Just received an email asking me to complete the CASPer. There were not many dates/times to choose from. The next available date was June 21st. 

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I just graduated in May so I'm still getting everything together to submit by the August 1 deadline. I noticed most of you have already submitted and are mentioning interviews. Do they give early interviews for people who submit their application early? 

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@marlee28 Most programs utilize rolling admission, meaning that they review applications as they receive them. So the earlier you apply, the better your chances are.

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Be ready to wait for results  - I took it on the 3rd and it is still pending results. says it takes on average 3-4 wks to be graded and sent to school.....Oh yeah, Test results are not shared with applicants! See below for statement from email.

***Please note that there is a processing period which typically lasts about four weeks. We do not share CASPer test results with applicants, they will only be shared with the schools on your distribution list. CASPer test results are only valid for one application cycle, and only for the program type and country that you reserved for.***

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Does anyone know if they are waiting to offer interviews until after your CASPer exam has been graded? Seems like an awfully long wait for interviews for a January start program.

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Seems like it. I havent heard anything from the school and I completed CASper on the 3rd. 

 

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Just got the call about 10:00 to interview on July 11th! CASPer scores may be getting there from June 3rd. 

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1 hour ago, HeyheyPA said:

Just got the call about 10:00 to interview on July 11th! CASPer scores may be getting there from June 3rd. 

Got an interview as well! Did they send you the email with more information? I'm still waiting on mine 

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30 minutes ago, prepaguy1 said:

Got an interview as well! Did they send you the email with more information? I'm still waiting on mine 

Congrats to those getting interviews! Would anyone mind sharing their stats? If not I completely understand. Good luck!!

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I'm waiting for my email too! This is my first cycle and first interview so I'm super nervous. 

Stats: 3.2 cGPA and sGPA, took a ton of classes post bac so my pre req GPA is higher; GRE 309, W 4.0; >8,000 patient hours in a multi speciality ophthalmology practice, ~500 hours volunteering, some research experience, shadowed 2 PAs, one in the burn ICU and one in the OR doing lumbar fusions, also I already took my CASPer a couple weeks ago for another program

Edited by sarahbelle84
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4 hours ago, prepaguy1 said:

Got an interview as well! Did they send you the email with more information? I'm still waiting on mine 

Just got my email about details. I'm from Atlanta so any info on travel info from locals is much appreciated! My main concern is uber or if I should rent a car? 

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