Jump to content

PENNSYLVANIA: Penn State PA Program 2018-2019 Cycle

Recommended Posts

Hi,

I interviewed for this program last year. Out of the 7 people interviewing that day multiple races, ages, and backgrounds were represented including veterans. One gentleman who I know was accepted was "non-white" as you put it. I believe from my experience that those invited to interview the same date as me was very bright and friendly group of aspiring PAs representing a number of backgrounds. Maybe this can help put your mind at ease a little? Even if it is just from my inside look. 🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone! My name is Paige and I'm currently applying to Penn State College of Medicine's PA Program.

I am very late with submitting my application. My intentions where to submit my application by my own personal deadline of July. I struggled significantly with perfecting my personal statement. While writing it I became my own worst enemy criticizing every rough draft I wrote which furthered delayed me. I eventually completed my application but it was extremely late in the application cycle, October to be exact... I'm still extremely disappointed in myself for letting this become a setback as I know it is advised to submit your application early in the year and I was so determined to meet my deadline. 

Penn State is at the top of my list for PA programs. I currently live in the State College area and I'm so impressed when talking to students about their academics. 

I have yet to complete my supplement application as I'm still boggled down with trying to perfect it. Last night, I rechecked the requirements and found to my dismay that the admissions committee will not look over your application if you do not have 3 letters of recommendation. I currently only have two. One from a doctor that I shadowed for my university's field experience and a PA that I shadowed. I asked one of my previous employers to write me a letter of recommendation, who agreed to, but before submitting my letter she had a falling out with our facility and hasn't submitted my ROL after I've tried multiple times to contact her. 

I'm extremely distraught as to what I should do at this point. I've been asking multiple colleagues for ROL but I'm afraid it will be too late before the deadline. I'm asking for advice on what are the next steps I should take. I'm desperate. Thank you. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, FuturePA8 said:

I am surprised this hasn't been brought up yet. There seems to be a real lack of diversity in the program, since the program began several years ago. I understand the program is in central Pennsylvania (a heavy white demographic) but I'm sure there are great applicants who are non-white/POC out of nearly 3-5,000 who apply each year to add diversity to your class. I also understand that the program adds diversity in terms of disadvantaged backgrounds (economically, educationally, first generation in college, etc.) but, again, it seems that they prefer this in white applicants (the class picture that I've seen every year seems to point to this).

I really hope the program lives up to its desire of "attracting a diverse study body" and works towards this goal in the coming years. It is quite disappointing. It is also discouraging for many of my POC Pre-PA peers who have also brought up the program's blatant lack of diversity. They feel as if they have no chance even though they are competitive. They should not feel as if their race/ethnicity will hinder them from becoming a PA and, when I see that majority of the class in this program and others are primarily white even when they claim "we love diversity", I can't help but agree and sympathize with them. The program also seems to cap asian students to about 3 per year? I would really like to hear more from the program's perspective as to why there is this lack of diversity. 

The PA profession needs more non-white, POC professionals. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4874816/ (focusing on race/ethnicity) this was published a few years ago and while the numbers might be slightly different today, they still apply. 

I'm a racial minority (mixed black and white) and SES disadvantaged applicant accepted to Penn State this cycle. I never felt I had "no chance even though I was competitive." On the contrary, Penn State gave me the most personal, thoughtful, genuine interview experience out of the 8 interviews I attended. I even interviewed with natural hair and a summer tan and experienced nothing but warmth from everyone at the program. My race was a non-issue throughout the interview day and clearly did not prevent me from receiving an acceptance letter.

Just as your POC pre-PA peers should not be hindered from becoming PAs because of their race, excellent applicants should not be denied simply because they're white. Also, Penn State can only select the best applicants from those who choose to apply. 80% of CASPA applicants are white and, as you've acknowledged, Hershey is a predominately white portion of PA. I think this contributes to any perceived lack of diversity more than bias in Penn State's selection process. Instead of spending so much time assessing Penn State's perceived lack of diversity, I'd respectfully suggest you and your POC peers could better invest your time and energy into strengthening your applications.

Edited by nichole96
  • Like 2
  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@rs27991 thanks for responding kindly and sharing your experience. It is some relief and I'm glad that was your experience 🙂

@nichole96 The program appears to reserve nearly 50 percent, give or take, of its class for men, yet men are a minority in the applicant pool. If the program can find the energy to provide more equality for men in the PA field (this is important too), then they can put in the effort to culturally and ethnically diversify their class. I'm hearing things, but it just isn't reflected when I see the class pictures, and that's why I came here to ask. I want to be wrong and I want my thoughts to be challenged otherwise my doubts would continue to reflect the reality minorities/POC/non-whites have to live in. 

Institutions have the power to influence change. It is true that the majority of applicants are white. But there is a widespread acknowledgement that the profession needs to be more racially diverse. I am not saying qualified white applicants shouldn't be accepted, just as I know you are not saying that white applicants tend to be the best applicants hence they they are mainly accepted (even though it came across that way). Nor am I speaking for every minority's experience (you had a positive experience). But I am allowed to ask and voice concern.

The next step to this is to actively do something about it, by providing more seats to qualified racially diverse applicants so the demographics begin to shift. If they continue to take a majority of white applicants because the applicant pool just happens to be that way with an oh well, what can we do about it attitude, and succumbing to this, then they're perpetuating this disproportion. Institutions have the power to change this by admitting more diverse applicants, in turn changing the current statistics so it's more even, not preserve it the way it is. And this is also what I mean when I say the program's goal to diversify the class is misleading. It's not just Penn State. 

Congratulations on being given many PA interview opportunities and I am glad you also had a great interview day experience. I also had a similar experience and only had to apply to two PA schools because I was admitted to a school I really like. One school emailed me offering an interview invite the very next day after I submitted my secondary, and I applied pretty late. The class size is also very small. My POC friends have also had multiple acceptances. I came here to inquire because when I first started browsing for PA schools, this is one of the first impressions I got of this PA program (and others too). I decided not to apply here for many reasons. Over the course of the current application cycle I have spoken to other PA applicants and even asked what schools they were considering. I suggested Penn State because it's a great program, but they also brought up the fact that the class is very white. This was one person a few months ago, and someone else mentioned it again very recently. Multiple people are saying and thinking the same thing. I also thought that maybe they could strengthen their application, but I did not dismiss their feelings and thoughts. I sympathized and listened. 

This is why I posted, to ask what's up. If the program is truly doing what it can to add diversity in all angles, then I say continue. If they are not, then I am respectfully providing feedback and asking that they strengthen their diversity and inclusion department and put more effort into recruiting racially diverse applicants. 

I also want to make it clear that I am not accusing Penn State for discrimination or a bias. My first post could've definitely had a better tone, but it's difficult to convey this while typing. I am questioning an observation I made regarding the program's statistics and racial makeup. I would like to hear from the program's perspective because I know I am not an adcom and might be missing something.

I've expressed my concerns in this post and the last and don't want to go on a tangent about race in this thread. You may PM message me. 

Edited by FuturePA8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You acknowledge "it's not just Penn State" but you've only posted here. You "don't want to go on a tangent about race in this thread" when the only two posts you've contributed to this entire forum are these attempts to call PSU out as a racist institution. You say you "want your thoughts to be challenged," but both responses you've received have refuted your claims and you're still defending your assumptions with vague anecdotes.

You didn't choose to apply here and you've been accepted elsewhere, so why does it bother you so much? Get off your soapbox, enjoy the New Year, attend the flawlessly inclusive school of your dreams, and move on.

  • Like 3
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, I want to wish everyone following a very happy New Year.  I hope this finds you well and taking time to enjoy this special season amidst the business of the CASPA cycle as it begins to wind down.

Which leads me to the questions/concerns posed by ps149563 that may also be shared by others.  With regards to timing, October is/was definitely not too late to apply.  In fact, the only time it is too late to apply is if you have not met the January deadlines for submitting your CASPA and secondary applications.  If you read previous posts in this thread, as well as threads for prior PSU cycles, you will see that our program considers applications throughout the cycle and conducts interviews into February for those who meet the admission requirements and have met the deadlines.  Furthermore, although candidates are accepted, declined, and waitlisted throughout the cycle, anyone who is offered an interview- regardless if it is early or late in the cycle- is guarenteed to be interviewing for an open seat in the next matriculating class.  To be sure, there are more seats available early in the cycle compared o the end.  However, all interviewed candidates are vying for an open spot and not just the waitlist. The reason for this is that the program believes in giving all applicants, such as individuals like you ps149563, the opportunity to be considered regardless of when you are prepared to submit your application.  It is just one of may ways the program strives to diversify its applicant pool, a point I will address in a moment.

With regards to assessing your readiness to apply, you must first determine whether you satisfy all of the admissions requirements.  If you do not, then you must determine if the requirements not yet met can be completed after the application deadlines, or even, after the interview or offer of acceptance.  Things that fall into this category include some pre-requisite course work (usually not more than two courses should be "planned" or "in progress" at the time of application) and health care experience hours.  Keep in mind, however, that ALL requirements must be completed prior to the first day of class.  Other requirements, however, must be completed by the time of application for an application to be considered.  These include GRE/MCAT, essays, and letters of recommendation.  With that stated, if you do not feel that you are able to submit what you personally consider a strong application that fully reflects your strengths and unique talents/attributes, I would encourage you to continue to improve it even if that means waiting until the next CASPA cycle to apply.  If you are not sure if your application is strong, I recommend finding a mentor (such as recently graduated PA or current PA student) who can give you honest, unbiased feedback which will help you decide how to proceed.  It is also very helpful to compare yourself to the matriculating class profiles, paying particular attention to the accepted ranges for things such as GRE scores, GPAs, and health care experience hours. 

And, just a quick note about letters of recommendation- most applicants are usually best served by providing letters from references who can each speak to different aspects of the candidate's application.  For instance, my recommendations came from the supervisor of my full-time job I was working immediately prior to PA school, a professor of one of my recently completed pre-requisite courses, and a physician who served as my mentor.  This provided the admissions committee attestations to my work ethic/reliability, academic abilities, and my personal qualities which would allow me to succeed both in the program and as a future PA.

I hope this helps you, ps149563, and anyone who is considering applying in these final days of the PSU cycle.

Last, but certainly not least, I wish to address the concerns voiced herein about our program's commitment to diversity within its classes.  I want to re-iterate that I post on my own behalf and my statements should not be construed as official communication from the program itself.  I have, however, informed the program leadership of these concerns and they will address them if and when they feel it is appropriate and necessary to do so.

I gave considerable thought to whether or not I wanted to entertain these, in my opinion, unfounded statements.  After all, if one studies the picture of the graduating Class of 2017 (matriculating Class of 2015), I am sure I would be considered one of the majority- white and female.  However, on behalf of both myself and my classmates, as well as my fellow alums and future alums, I felt it necessary to speak to the collective diversity we represent.  Diversity is more than color- it is all the things we bring to the table.  In the Class of 2017 alone, we had diversity with respect to race/ethnicity, economic status, education/work/military experience, age, and gender- to name just a few.  We were/are a class of 19 men and 11 women.  Five students were in their mid to late 30s with families and thousands of hours of clinical experience while several were new grads with minimal health care hours.  Additionally, at least five students considered themselves non-white or of another ethnicity with many others having spent considerable time working with diverse populations, including urban populations and the medically underserved.  At least 6 students spoke a second language.  Nearly 30 different educational backgrounds and previous work experiences were represented and ranged from biology to English to exercise science to philosophy and even photography.  Some of us relied completely on student loans while others were more financially secure.  And at least four students are veterans.  There was also diversity with respect to disabilities.  However, by simply looking at our picture, almost all of these attributes are undetectable and certainly cannot be deduced from the appearance of any one individual.  So I encourage you to re-examine the profiles that are publicly available for each matriculating class on the program's website which objectively define our composition.  Based on my personal knowledge of my class, as well as the classes that have come before and after my own, every PSU PA student is unique and diverse and, as such, is  (or soon will be) serving to meet the needs of an equally diverse patient population. 

Again, wishing you all the best as you continue on your journey to becoming a PA.  And may your 2019 be full of health and happiness! 

Best,

  - Sue, PA-C, PSU Class of 2017     

Edited by ST@PSU
grammatical error
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi FuturePA8 - Thank you for posting - even if I believe your posts to be misdirected I am happy to respond and share what I can.

Posts like yours allow me to take inventory of the work I do day in and day out as the Director of Admissions for this program. It also allows me the time to share with a wider audience what we do at Penn State since we’re being called out because someone is dissatisfied with the way our class photos look. Does a photo really tell of a group’s diversity? You wouldn’t know from looking at a picture of our faculty and staff that we have two veterans, one Hispanic, one Native American, and two first generation in college. That’s 66% of our faculty and staff with some form of under-representation or disadvantage. Knowing our team, I am confident that no one exhibits an ‘oh well, what can we do about it’ attitude as you’ve suggested.

FuturePA8 - Please share with me what program you’ll be attending. It would help me to possibly reach out to their admissions team – many programs work together in a friendly way and I would enjoy learning more about their strategic plan to diversify the student population.

I joined the PA Forum to help demystify the elusive admissions process and clear up misconceptions about the admissions process as a whole. It can be overwhelming for prospective CASPA applicants to get a handle on so let’s dive in to help answer FuturePA8’s posts.

I absolutely LOVE working with candidates to Penn State – the strength of the applicant pool is astounding and continues to strengthen year after year. The students that make up each class are incredibly talented, inspirational, hard-working and dedicated women and men of all ages, races, creeds, and walks of life. From traditionally underrepresented in medicine (URM), to veterans, to DREAMers, to parents, to students with disabilities, to career changers, to LGBTQ, to international students; each cohort is vibrant and rich in diversity. Of the 150 students who have graduated or are currently enrolled in our program 27% are traditionally URM, from military service, or students with disabilities.

Our 25+/- candidate interview days that take place each admissions cycle highlight the very best from our applicant pool. We take great pride in our recruiting, screening, and interview process. If we wanted to recruit a class where every student had a perfect 4.0 GPA from undergrad, we could certainly do that, we have the numbers to do that but we make a concerted effort to recruit differently.

Our holistic review gives preference, to qualified candidates with military service, URM, economically and educationally disadvantaged candidates, second career seekers, and those with a strong interest in primary care.

Preference however is not awarded to males nor do we reserve seats for/cap enrollment of any demographic subset as you are suggesting. You may find it interesting that nearly 50% of our total applicant pool are males so to suggest that we intentionally bring in more men than what is warranted is inaccurate. Does it buck the national trend? Certainly. Is it appropriate given our applicant pool? Absolutely.

Below are some statistics from our current 2019-2020 admissions cycle you may find helpful. You will note we interview more URM and military candidates than what is represented in our total applicant pool.

As a reminder to all potential applicants to Penn State, our cycle is still very active with many seats remaining. All candidates have until January 30 to submit their Secondary Application. We are still interviewing and offering admission through February, so these percentages, again are not finalized.

Percentage of:

Total CASPA Applicant Pool to Penn State

Percent Interviewed at Penn State

URM

10%

15%

Military Service

1%

10%

Male

48%

39%

 

We receive important feedback by surveying all interviewed candidates who were denied admissions, waitlisted, or offered a seat. At the end of each cycle, our program holds a retreat devoted to adjusting, enhancing or correcting areas of our admissions and interview process.

Does that make Penn State’s process perfect? By no means. But the effort is most certainly present.

I am pleased with the program’s effort to date, in terms of pipeline recruiting, mentoring of youth, work with high school and undergraduate students, and participation in diversity in healthcare career fairs to name some activities.

So what else can Penn State do to increase enrolled students from URM and military? Our program will be working with our Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion to hold candidate interview days for URM and those with military service, including their families if so desired. These sessions will include additional presentations, dinner, and time with current students who are URM or military the night prior to the candidate interview day. There are some additional projects we are working on that I am excited about however they are in their infancy stages and to discuss publicly would be ill-timed.

I am looking forward to working on these projects in the coming months and years. Will these be the answer to increased racial and ethnic diversity? Time will tell but I am certain Penn State is committed to enrolling as diverse a class as possible.

Be well and happy new year!

Caryn Stopper
Director of Admissions

 

Penn State College of Medicine’s Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion’s mission and vision statement:

Mission Statement for Diversifying Penn State College of Medicine’s Student Population

According to the U.S. Bureau of Statistics, the demographic composition of the nation is changing. The U.S. white population, which was 62.1 percent in 2015, is expected to decrease to 46 percent by 2065, while the Hispanic population will increase to 24 percent (from 18 percent in 2015). The Asian population will rise to 14 percent (compared with 6 percent in 2015) and the Black population will remain relatively the same at 13 percent. Students entering medical school in 2013-2014 and 2015-2016, across the nation, were 60 percent white, 22 percent Asian, 9.8 percent Hispanic, and 7.5 percent Black, according to the American Association of Medical Colleges. The changing national demographics mean that our student/learner population should become increasingly more diverse as well.

Recruiting a diverse medical student, graduate student, and physician assistant student body will have a positive impact on the learning environment for the increasing diversity representation of our learner population and on the quality of education provided to all students/learners.

Increasing the diversity of the medical student population and residents potentially increases the number of physicians who will work with under-represented populations and work in under-served communities.

As a result, Penn State College of Medicine is committed to recruiting, retaining, and advancing a student body that is reflective of the diversity of the nation’s and medical center’s patient population. The focus of our diversity efforts will be those from groups traditionally underrepresented in medicine (African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American individuals), those with military service, and students with disabilities.

Edited by PennState_PA_Program
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hi all -- I haven't posted in a while but I've been keeping an eye on all this board.  So far I've only seen two people post that they've been accepted for the upcoming cycle.  Anybody have any idea how many seats have actually been filled?

 

Thanks,

PK

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/4/2019 at 12:23 PM, PRK20 said:

 

Hi all -- I haven't posted in a while but I've been keeping an eye on all this board.  So far I've only seen two people post that they've been accepted for the upcoming cycle.  Anybody have any idea how many seats have actually been filled?

 

Thanks,

PK

Hi!

Thanks for continuing to follow!  While I am not in a position to know that information, it is likely that not the majority of the 30 seats are left but there are at least a few.  Everyone who is invited to interview is guaranteed to be interviewing for an open seat and not just the waitlist.  Interviews typically go through the end of February and, after all seats are filled, everyone who has not been previously notified will be informed of their status.  This occurs usually sometime in March.  Keep in mind, however, if you are a waitlisted candidate, the time between March and May is a very busy time for most PA programs to be giving out acceptances and, consequently, applicants accepted to PSU may forfeit their seat to attend somewhere else.  This is when the waitlist comes into play.  For me, there was a student who, unfortunately, had to withdraw just a few days before the start of class and, with only a weekend to prepare, I found myself as one of the incredibly fortunate 30 in the Class of 2017!  

Hang in there everyone!  Best of luck!

- Sue, PA-C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took some AP courses that allowed me to fulfill my writing requirement during my undergraduate studies. I understand that PSU does accept AP credits for writing courses if accepted by my undergraduate program. For filling out the prerequisite course section in the secondary application, what would I put down for the institution and term year/grade/credit? Would i simply use the undergraduate institution with my first term year and skip putting the credit and grade? 

Thank you in advance! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, bhkim said:

I took some AP courses that allowed me to fulfill my writing requirement during my undergraduate studies. I understand that PSU does accept AP credits for writing courses if accepted by my undergraduate program. For filling out the prerequisite course section in the secondary application, what would I put down for the institution and term year/grade/credit? Would i simply use the undergraduate institution with my first term year and skip putting the credit and grade? 

Thank you in advance! 

bhkim: When completing the academic review of the supplemental, enter the school where you received the AP credit, enter the number of credits received for the AP course, and select AP from the drop down box. Obviously there is not a letter grade to list. 

Only enter a course prefix and number if the AP course was given credit for a specific course.

Caryn Stopper
Director of Admissions

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone else heard anything from the school? I submitted my application late October and I have not received any emails from them. Are all spots filled?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, katspa said:

Anyone else heard anything from the school? I submitted my application late October and I have not received any emails from them. Are all spots filled?

I applied the end of May and have not heard anything yet. Best of luck! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, katspa said:

Anyone else heard anything from the school? I submitted my application late October and I have not received any emails from them. Are all spots filled?

Again, I am not in a position to know how many of the 30 seats remain open, however, I do know that the Program honors their commitment to not fill all spots until everyone who is invited to interview has done so.  And because they also honor their commitment to consider all prospective students who have submitted completed applications by the respective deadlines, interviews will be held into February.  I also know that at least one of my classmates was a testament to these committments as he finished applying within a day or two of the deadline following which he was invited to interview and ultimately accepted.

Best of luck to all!

- Sue

Edited by ST@PSU
grammatical correction

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone,

Just a reminder to those who may have started following more recently-  earlier posts in this thread describe our admission’s process, and typical timeline of our admission cycle, in more detail.  Hopefully these will help give you a better idea of when you might hear back.

Best,

    - Sue

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am hoping someone can help me with this question. I was looking back over my CASPA application and noticed that I forgot to add in my shadowing hours under Experiences (I have no idea how I forgot to do this.) Should I just add the shadowing hours and update my application or email the programs? I still have two schools I have not heard back from, Penn State being one of them, and I did not know if it was too late to send this information in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey All!

Does anyone know when the final round of interviews is?

Also, wondering if anyone has heard from them recently. This thread hasn't been as active as some others.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, esfisher said:

Hey All!

Does anyone know when the final round of interviews is?

Also, wondering if anyone has heard from them recently. This thread hasn't been as active as some others.

Thanks!

I haven't heard from them since August.

Edited by emmaidk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, esfisher said:

Hey All!

Does anyone know when the final round of interviews is?

Also, wondering if anyone has heard from them recently. This thread hasn't been as active as some others.

Thanks!

Again, I am not able to provide specific details, however, the last of the interviews will take place sometime this month.  If you completed both CASPA and our secondary applications prior to the required deadlines, you are eligible to be considered for these final interviews.  Following the interview process, when all 30 seats will be filled, the remaining applicants will be notified of their status (this usually takes place in early March).  IN GENERAL- based on my own experience, the experience of my classmates and fellow alums/current students, and from posts in this forum- interviews are offered within a few weeks of submitting a completed application (ie, if you submitted your application in August, you would LIKELY be offered an interview in August or September).  Thus, the interviews taking place this month LIKELY are for applicants who submitted closer to the deadline.

Hope this helps as you continue to wind your way through the last few months of this CASPA cycle.  Best of luck!

- Sue

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone,

I recently received a message regarding how heavily various components of the application, specifically the GREs, are weighed.  First and foremost, this is certainly not something which is known to me.  That being said, I would refer those asking or thinking about this question back to the dialogue regarding the emphasis our program places on diversity.  If one prerequisite is weighed more heavily than another, that would, by definition, limit diversity in one way or another.  To be sure, there are some required (and some recommended) thresholds applicants should obtain to be fairly considered.  However, to say that one requirement is weighted more than others, I believe, would be a very inaccurate, and certainly misguided, assumption.

I hope this answers the question.

Best,

- Sue, PA-C, PSU Class of 2017

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone,

For those of you who have been following along preparing to apply during the next CASPA cycle which begins on April 25th, I wanted to pass this info along which may be of interest.  On March 28th at 6 pm, an alum of the PSU PA Class of 2016 will be co-hosting a FREE webinar titled “How To Get In To PA School”.  Only 300 spots are available so consider registering EARLY!

https://www.medgeek.co/webinar-registration8

Also a reminder that this thread will remain active up until a new thread is created for the 2019-20 application cycle.  So feel free to continue to post your questions and comments and share your experiences.

Best of luck to those that have applied to programs this year!

- Sue, PA-C, PSU PA Class of 2017

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

Another resource to send your way, this one about the CASPA application itself:

https://medgeeks.co/articles/caspa-application

Not only do I like the content this group provides, but PSU alums Dan Champigny (‘16) and Joe Rad (‘17) are regular contributors.  Check them out- online, on your fav social media platforms, and podcasts!  WE ARE!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone!  Sharing this from the PSCOM Facebook page- so proud to be a part of these amazing organizations.  Congrats to those who will soon join us as the PA Class of 2021 and continue our collective pursuit of medical and patient care excellence!

“Penn State Health was among 29 hospitals and health systems to make Forbes’ second annual list of the “Best Employers for Diversity.” Penn State Health ranked 127th out of the 500 employers that made the national listing. That’s up from 192 last year.

‘When we seek and value diverse perspectives, we see the world in broader strokes and are better able to achieve excellence in patient care, education, research and service.’  – Dr. Craig Hillemeier, dean of Penn State College of Medicine, Penn State’s senior vice president for health affairs and chief executive officer of Penn State Health.”

http://bit.ly/2O0OcMx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • By FuturePA20202021
      Thought I'd start a 2020-2021 pa forum for this cycle. I was verified on 5/14. Good Luck everyone!
    • By Taylorfl17
      Hello, I am having a lot of trouble trying to narrow down schools to apply to. Where I currently live, most of the schools nearby I cannot apply to because of my stats so I am seeking out of state options. I am ending my sophomore year so I still have another year before I can begin applying (and another year to continue to boost my GPA). Any help would be appreciated!
       GPA currently: 3.426 ( My last semester has not been added in still and my science GPA would be similar)
      I am not taking Ochem 2 or biochem but I have planned/taken genetics, cell bio, microbio, ochem 1, 2 semesters of general bio and 2 semesters of general chem, med term, med ethics, anatomy, physiology, and most other pre-reqs. My main issue is that I have AP credit for statistics that my university accepts for my BS degree but I have noticed that there are some PA schools that do not accept that. I am also extremely involved  and by the time I apply, I will have a high number of service/leadership hours (President of my schools Pre-PA Association, chapter correspondent and philanthropy committee for my sorority, recruitment chair for the universities Relay for Life, and involved in other orgs). I have worked as a nursing assistant at the city's major hospital for over a year and I am seeking another job as a scribe in the ER. I have not begun shadowing yet because of COVID affecting my summer opportunities. 
      If you have experience in applying or likes/dislikes of literally any schools, I would appreciate it! I am not trying to decide on a school right now, I am simply trying to gain insight on potential schools to apply to since the ones near me are not options (Ohio/Michigan area). I have started a detailed list of schools I have researched, but I am struggling to find realistic options and those that I would be able to apply to.
      Thanks!
       
       
       
    • By anaskouk
      Hey good people! I hope you’re all well and healthy during this COVID-19 outbreak. Just wanted to start this early and see your progress on the 2020-21 PA applications!
    • By Madison34213
      Hi, I was looking around on google and couldn’t find any direct information, but I was curious if anyone has a comprehensive list of schools that have waived the GRE due to the current situation afflicting our nation? Any information would be great. Thanks!
    • By PrePA1208
      I had to retake one class my freshman year, and I really do not want to waste a few sentences in my personal statement to speak about it. Although, I also understand it is best to address it somewhere. Is there another place on CASPA to discuss shortcomings on your application? I do not see a place, but I want to make sure I am not missing something. 
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More