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Having trouble finding patient care hours


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Hello! i am a sophomore in college and set to graduate in May 2020. I am having troubles finding health care hours. Every job i’ve seen is full time, and i can’t do that with 18-21 credits every semester and two kids. The only job i’ve found is a Direct Support Professional. These people work with disabled people, kids and adults. Working with kids means watching them, giving them their medications, taking to therapy etc, and adults live in group home settings. So feeding, medications, etc. I was wondering if this would count for HCE? The program i’m looking into just says a list of some jobs and says “not limited too” and I emailed the program for help and they didn’t clarify anything. 

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Depending on where you live you could possibly find a job as a dialysis technician.  I am not sure how it goes with the hospitals at night, if they have techs on-call or if they have nurses take care of the patients.  However, there are over-night clinics that have part-time status where I live (Minnesota), actually there are positions right now that need PCTs because they can't keep people... just five minutes walking distance from my apartment.  Possibly a few clinics near you.  The thing is these over-night dialysis tech jobs still run the same time span as for day shifts, minimum 10-12 hours.  A lot of turn over in dialysis, something to keep an eye out for on indeed.com or something.  

Here is a copy and paste from my PA school's webpage about dPCE:  The scribe job was recently added at my school, but is still ranked lower than the others at many other places, something to keep in mind.

"We recommend 2,000 hours of paid, direct, hands-on clinical patient care.  Direct patient care includes roles in which you are responsible for things such as taking vital signs, administering medication, charting, drawing blood, tending to personal cares, dressing wounds, etc.

Some examples of competitive patient care experience include: nursing, scribe, certified nursing assistant, medical assistant, patient care assistant, paramedic, EMT, military medic, respiratory therapist, athletic trainer, radiology technician, mental health worker, laboratory/medical technician, clinical researcher, medical interpreter, and community health worker/health educator."

Sounds like your question here...would fall under tending to personal cares and handling medications.  According to my program, yes to your question.

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I got my health care experience through working at a plasma donation center. You can do phlebotomy and take vital signs with no previous training. I have had multiple coworkers get accepted to PA school using this as their HCE. You should look into it if you have a plasma center near you.

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If you pre-PA's want to have less stress AFTER you graduate school and start working I would recommend higher level HCE such as RN, EMT-P, RRT as these will make you shine when trying to get a job plus actually help you when you are thrown to the wolves your first or two year out of school. If you plan on NOT doing a residency and want to go into ER/UC/ICU, etc (or really any specialty) then it would behoove you to have high level HCE and not sell yourself short just cause you want to get into school. 

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On 3/23/2018 at 8:55 PM, Aly711 said:

I got my health care experience through working at a plasma donation center. You can do phlebotomy and take vital signs with no previous training. I have had multiple coworkers get accepted to PA school using this as their HCE. You should look into it if you have a plasma center near you.

This sounds like a really terrible idea just to get "hours", the point of the PA profession (read the history) was to train army medics with HIGH LEVEL of HCE and not just vitals and drawing blood. A monkey could do vitals and draw blood. Look at your post above, "You can do phlebotomy and take vital signs with no previous training." Your experience (at least to me) would be NOTHING and actually turn me away from your application as you did the bare minimum to get in. Now this is fine for some schools, but for myself (I am only 4 years out of school) I would laugh at this. You need to be able to look at a patient and assess them from the doorway, are they sick? stable? etc. Please do yourself a favor (and everyone else reading this) look into RN, RRT, EMT-P (paramedic) (not basic). Good luck!

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  • 2 years later...
On 3/27/2018 at 9:38 AM, camoman1234 said:

This sounds like a really terrible idea just to get "hours", the point of the PA profession (read the history) was to train army medics with HIGH LEVEL of HCE and not just vitals and drawing blood. A monkey could do vitals and draw blood. Look at your post above, "You can do phlebotomy and take vital signs with no previous training." Your experience (at least to me) would be NOTHING and actually turn me away from your application as you did the bare minimum to get in. Now this is fine for some schools, but for myself (I am only 4 years out of school) I would laugh at this. You need to be able to look at a patient and assess them from the doorway, are they sick? stable? etc. Please do yourself a favor (and everyone else reading this) look into RN, RRT, EMT-P (paramedic) (not basic). Good luck!

Idk if anyone has told you this before, but you are really rude.

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On 11/9/2020 at 10:46 PM, 2020wegotthis said:

Idk if anyone has told you this before, but you are really rude.

 

On 11/9/2020 at 10:46 PM, 2020wegotthis said:

Idk if anyone has told you this before, but you are really rude.

Truthfulness is rude? Helping you about is rude? Because you might not like what I saw but this is the best path to succeed as a PA. I have seen several PAs that didnt have prior high level HCE and they struggled for a year or more to get their feet wet and a new PA. I am not changing my tune to make you feel better. Most experienced PAs will agree with my statement. If you think this comment was rude then you probably wont make it as a PA. Good luck.

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