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Upper level vs. Lower level Anatomy


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I am currently an undergraduate junior seeking a bachelor’s in sociology and an associates in natural sciences. My health advisor is strongly suggesting that I take 3000 level separate Anatomy and Physiology courses rather than the 1000 level A&P courses. The problem is that I have heard very bad things about the professor for the upper level courses, and there is a great professor for the A&P ones. Did you guys have to take the separate courses or did you take the ones grouped together? Do you think that it will affect my chances of getting into PA school at all to take A&P rather than the separate Anatomy and Physiology courses?

 

 

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Unless upper level is required for your major (i don't see why it would be), you shouldn't NEED to take it.  This is program specific, however.  Some PA programs will require upper div anatomy and physiology separate and some list it as an a recommendation.    

If you want a competitive application and the schools you plan to apply for list upper div anatomy and physiology separate as a recommendation, then you MAY need to consider this route more seriously.

 

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Thank you both so much for your input. I am going to look back over next semester’s schedule and try to see what I think. My main concern is that I’ll be taking it the same semester that I take Organic Chemistry 1, and I haven’t heard the best things about that course so I just want to be sure that I’m not overloading myself. I am sure that butchering my GPA would be a bit more detrimental than just taking a lower level course lol


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The only thing that I would be cautious about is that if the 1000 level A&P courses are equivalent to other colleges 100 level A&P courses, they will most likely not count. I am by no means an expert, but I have done a lot of research on the matter and was an academic advisor for awhile after college. A lot of schools have a 100 level A&P that is just an overview of the body, and then they offer a 200 level or higher A&P or Anatomy and Physiology separate that is made for those pursuing medical careers so I would look in to that. Generally speaking your introductory biology level classes should be your 100/1000 level courses and your A&P courses should be 200/2000 level courses because the general bio courses at the 100/1000 level are prerequisites. So def check in to that. IF the 1000 level A&P courses are the ones designed for health care fields then you are good and there is no need to take upper level. 

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I am surprised that Anatomy and Physiology I and II are not at 200/2000 level for you, typically you need to complete 100/1000 level biology courses to get into the class to begin with.  The Anatomy and Physiology I and II was asked to be completed at the "science major level."  So, I would check if that is the case for the programs you are going to apply to.  1000 level might not be considered that.  Also, Organic Chemistry is pretty easy when you TRY to understand it.  You have a goal, to get into PA school.  That is a huge motivator to do well and stay on top of things.  I took Organic Chemistry twice, approximately 9 years apart.  Did not have problems with the material when I had a goal myself.

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I would take the upper division, I did myself (had a cadaver lab as well) and not only did the ADCOM like that, but it actually helped me a lot in PA school. I would rather suffer in undergrad than in PA school as anytime you can save will be a blessing. Trust me, take the upper division one and buckle down, it is for the best. Good luck!

P.S. you will not be able to "pick" your professors in PA school so avoiding this one will not help you any in PA school as you cannot avoid the professors there. 

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