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Just wondering if there has been any update of PAs practicing in Canada, specifically emergency medicine. Any clue on the scope of practice and salary? 

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I just noticed this here...sorry about the delay.

Pay varies by province - I'm in MB, we're the best paid in Canada (thus far) - starting wage is about $39/hr and caps at ~$56-57/hr.  Ontario and AB cap around ~$45'ish/hr.  Not sure about NB.  

Scope of practice is flushed out where you work - varies from health region and even hospital, but usual things are needles and tubes, sewing, casting, joint reductions, sedations, etc.  

SK

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Thanks for the response! pay seems a little less than one would expect in the US.. but given PAs are newer in Canada (to my understanding at least) seems appropriate. The scope I am surprised with a bit. Getting to throw a few tubes in and do some sedations is better than a lot of EM positions i know of here in the states. Thanks for the response again! 

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No worries.

The reason the pay is lower is (a) we're newish outside the military and (b), at least where I work, most people are paid by the provincial ministries of health - there aren't many privately paid ones in Manitoba where I work...in Ontario, it's usually a split salary scheme - half from the province, half from the employer.

SK

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man that cap for EM in Canada is well below where I started as a new grad in EM!

Do the benefits make up for the low pay at least?

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22 hours ago, davidccs said:

man that cap for EM in Canada is well below where I started as a new grad in EM!

Do the benefits make up for the low pay at least?

Benefit wise - well, we get health insurance that covers most medications (they aren't free here, though general health care is), dental and some physio; usually decent amount of vacation time (20-25 days PTO, I get 5 days education leave and  a small CME budget), allegedly malpractice coverage from employers, though I carry my own, since I trust admins as far as I can fling them.  At least in Canada, half my salary doesn't go to health insurance - however, half my salary goes to income tax...which is where "free" healthcare comes from here, so pick your poison that way.

 

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