Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I am wanting to get a dog before i start PA school in May. I am worried about the time i will be away from home and was looking for dog parents in PA and how they handle it. I will be living by myself for the first time and I think having a companion would be good for me.

 

Is it really hard to balance? 

Thanks!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bad idea. 

1) New dogs = lots of work. “New dogs” are basically any dog you haven’t had for at least a year.

2) Living alone means all the responsibility is on you

3) Want to go out for a beer on Friday after class? Want to stay late and study with friends? Want to go to the grocery store before heading home? Nope. You have to go home to the pup first.

4) You’ll need a dog walker midday. Going rate is about $20 per 30 min walk. Do you have that spare change around? That’s an extra $100/week.

Note: I have a dog and I’m in school right now. However, I have a support system for that dog. It’s not just me. I would never get one alone. 

Wait until you’re in a committed relationship. That’s really the best time for a dog.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is this going to be an older, house-trained pup, or a <1 year old pup? If you get a young one, it'll be Hell training them through basic commands, teething, pottying, separation anxiety, social interactions, etc. while going to school. Plus it wouldn't be fair to leave them alone so often while still young.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd recommend getting a dog that is >1 year old to relieve the burden of potty training, spay/neuter, etc. That being said, I'm a 2nd year PA student and I have a dog. It can definitely be done. He is crate-trained, which makes life easier for both of us. No need to worry about him chewing things up or getting into trouble around the apartment while I'm away. I walk him every morning before school and every night when I get home. He gets a treat every time he goes in his crate and he stays there while I'm gone. As long as you don't use the crate for punishment, the dog shouldn't have an issue with being crated as long as you pick a routine and stick with it. Consistency is key. Good luck! 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/24/2018 at 2:32 PM, karebear12892 said:

I'd recommend getting a dog that is >1 year old to relieve the burden of potty training, spay/neuter, etc. That being said, I'm a 2nd year PA student and I have a dog. It can definitely be done. He is crate-trained, which makes life easier for both of us. No need to worry about him chewing things up or getting into trouble around the apartment while I'm away. I walk him every morning before school and every night when I get home. He gets a treat every time he goes in his crate and he stays there while I'm gone. As long as you don't use the crate for punishment, the dog shouldn't have an issue with being crated as long as you pick a routine and stick with it. Consistency is key. Good luck! 

I also second this. Crate training saved my life and my pup loves his crate. It removed the stress of what he could've been doing while I was at school/work. If your dog needs to be let out before you're officially home for the day, maybe you could drive home during lunches. Again, this would all be ideal if he/she isn't a puppy. These things definitely take time and some breeds pick up faster than others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I lived alone with my dog for a year of PA school, but it was not new to me-aka was house trained, crate trained etc as above mentioned. It really was minimal work, however I do live 2 min away from school and just went home during breaks for walks. I ended up adopting dog # 2 during school which was fine since it was from a foster and thus already house and crate trained. No way would i recommend a puppy. I do know someone who got a puppy, though, and it has been fine. Maybe go ahead and adopt it now so you have a couple months of training ahead of school!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Echoing what everyone has said, it's REALLY hard to have a puppy or dog in general. Puppies are nearly impossible if you are alone or have no help/support. They're like kids, truly. They wake up in the middle of the night to potty and need to be taken out hourly in their first few months. I'd recommend waiting a few months until you get settled into your program and you know a little more about what your daily schedule is like. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah...

I'm worried about a dog of 2.5 years starting school in a few months.

I just keep saying to him..

"Hey man - if we get through this you can get off the food lion special kibble and get the good stuff."

(I budgeted for dog walk service 3x a week.)

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you already have a dog, I am sure you have a routine and find comfort in having unconditional love and affection. When I pet my dogs, I find it destressing. I also enjoy running with them and hiking. Sure, I might not be able to as much when school starts, but I think I will find time for these activities because they are important to me and aren't stressful to begin with. Honestly, I don't think I could live alone either and really appreciate their company. Even when studying, sometimes I recite stuff to them. 

If you are looking to purchase a companion, it would be good to do it before school starts to gain trust and develop your own routine. Also consider getting a low-maintenance breed or one that isn't overly active and make good apartment dogs It would be good to get a little dog because they eat less, take up less room, and have more room to run around in smaller spaces. There are some associated costs that you should be aware of such as monthly food expenses (20-30), yearly vaccinations including mandatory rabies in my state, and possibly even grooming services such as clipping nails (10-15).  

I haven't crate trained my dogs, props to those who could, but they haven't destroyed my house either, and use a doggy door appropriately. Best of luck in your upcoming journey!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I may be the odd one out but I think crating a dog has its place but shouldn't be used as a place to lock your dog up for 8 to 10 hours a day while you're at work or school, especially without the dog getting out for a walk or two during the day. Even if "he loves his crate!". I've had a dog that never destroyed the house when I was gone and was crate trained, but he was just left out with the dog door accessible to the outside. And roommates that helped sometimes by feeding him if I got held up at work. I understand that different dogs have different personalities and behavior and may be more unruly when left out, but put some serious thought into getting a dog before doing so. Especially young or new dogs. Older well trained dogs that youve had for a while are often a  bit easier. Everyone who had dogs in my class usually had a spouse or roommtes that helped them out so it can be done in the right situation.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Colorado said:

I may be the odd one out but I think crating a dog has its place but shouldn't be used as a place to lock your dog up for 8 to 10 hours a day while you're at work or school, especially without the dog getting out for a walk or two during the day. Even if "he loves his crate!". I've had a dog that never destroyed the house when I was gone and was crate trained, but he was just left out with the dog door accessible to the outside. And roommates that helped sometimes by feeding him if I got held up at work. I understand that different dogs have different personalities and behavior and may be more unruly when left out, but put some serious thought into getting a dog before doing so. Especially young or new dogs. Older well trained dogs that youve had for a while are often a  bit easier. Everyone who had dogs in my class usually had a spouse or roommtes that helped them out so it can be done in the right situation.

...Not sure if the "he loves his crate!" part is a dig at me, but you can definitely be entitled to your opinion without being rude about it. That's super cool that your dog can roam freely without destroying your house. However, my dog cannot roam freely without destroying the house or injuring himself, so being in his crate for a few hours until I get home during lunch each day and again at the end of the work/school day won't traumatize him while he learns the rules of the house. 🙄

Anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • Guest blee100
      By Guest blee100
      Hi I'm a undergrade pre pa student. I have one semester where ill be pretty much finishing up my last credits before graduation. Can someone recommend a pharmacology book that can get me mentally prepared for what to come ? Or simply any books that you think will get a pre pa student prepared in general. 
    • By Maylily7
      Hello!
      I was wondering if anyone accepted into any PA program could share or message their application stats (gpa, HCE...), I want to know whether, if I were to apply in a later cycle I could be considered a competitive applicant. Also, if you could put the schools you were accepted into/chose to go that would be great! Also, if there is a recent thread with accepted students stats you're more than welcome to send me or comment the link. Thanks so much!
      -Maylily7
    • By StevenBrule
      For those of us with a bit of downtime or waiting to matriculate, what are some excellent podcasts to help get those brain juices flowing!?  Please share podcast recommendations pertaining to any PA school related material, clinical, or specialty knowledge in particular.
      I'll generally nerd out on The Wilderness and Environmental Medicine Live and Emergency Med Cases podcasts (even though a lot of this material will eventually be outside our scope, it's still fun to learn about) in addition to a few others non-PA related.
    • By HuntCo
      Hi everyone,
      I am hoping that someone will be able to point me in the direction of some hospitals or private practices that have preceptors who are willing to take PA students in the scottsdale, mesa, Glendale, chandler, Tempe, Gilbert, Phoenix area of Arizona. I am currently a first year PA student at Hofstra university in New York and we are getting ready for rotations this year. For my program, we are allowed to do two rotations out of state so I hoping to go to Arizona. However, we are responsible for finding the preceptor and giving the information to Hofstra. 
      I will be staying in Scottsdale but I am willing to drive!! 
      Any information will be helpful as I am not really sure where to begin looking or who to contact. 
      Thank you SO much in advance!!!
      Hunter 
    • By PA2B1983
      An information session about the Jefferson College of Health Sciences​ PA program will take place this Friday, June 9, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.   The event will begin promptly at 10 a.m. in Room 616 on the Jefferson College campus at Carilion Roanoke Community Hospital, 101 Elm Street SE, Roanoke, VA 24013. Register through the link below. Reservations are encouraged, but not required.    Attendees will have the opportunity to learn more about the program, the PA profession and the application process. Jefferson PA program representatives will be on hand to speak individually with prospective students and their families.   https://www.facebook.com/JCHSPA/posts/414310522302184    
       The final information session in 2017 will be held July 21.
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More