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Children and PA School

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I know of two women who became pregnant during their clinical years.  One gave birth about 4-5 months after graduating, the other I believe 1 month before graduating (not the same school, and they went to PA school about 8 years apart).  Both were accommodated to differing degrees, both have commented that being pregnant made things more difficult but in general was still very doable.  They both also commented that the most disappointing aspect was being barred from some aspects of medicine due to risks to baby (radiology, specifically ill patients, etc.)

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My son was born one month in the start of year one.  My wife is an amazing woman but I was there for doctors visits, and studied at home- most of the kids didn't want to hang out with a 35 yo dude anyways.  I tried nighttime feedings but he liked his mom.  Just have to keep your eyes on the prize, and stay organized.  Grades suffered a bit, but it's PA-c, not PA-A.  

For fathers- you're going to miss a lot.  Both in school and in your child's life.  Remember- you can always refresh antibiotic sensitities.  You can't smile when your ten month old does something funny.

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2 hours ago, thinkertdm said:

For fathers- you're going to miss a lot.  Both in school and in your child's life. Remember- you can always refresh antibiotic sensitities. You can't smile when your ten month old does something funny.

I’m not crying you’re crying

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I’m trying to figure this out too. I’m wondering how soon after graduation I can start manufacturing babies. I figure the first few years out of school are the most important in terms of being available and focused. But those years are also gonna be the last few years of optimal reproductive health. It’s a lose-lose. 

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Life happens, whether you want it to or not.  While you are saving for your trip to paradise falls, car breaks down.  House payments.  Student loans.  And before you know it, Mr. Frederickson is in paradise falls with a little mailman and talking dog.

The point I'm trying to make is this- don't wait to do what is important.  To you.   

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On 2/20/2018 at 7:44 PM, katieo said:

I’m trying to figure this out too. I’m wondering how soon after graduation I can start manufacturing babies. I figure the first few years out of school are the most important in terms of being available and focused. But those years are also gonna be the last few years of optimal reproductive health. It’s a lose-lose. 

I'm a chronic birth-control failure. ;) (They think it was undiagnosed food allergies, but can't be sure. I conceived on the pill, the patch, and the nuva-ring.) But I wasn't the one in school at the time, my husband was. I can only share from that experience.

If I could change anything here's what I would have done:
-Ask for help, and accept the help available, without guilt, Whether it's grandma watching the baby, food stamps, or accomodations. 
-Don't worry about people around you having cleaner houses/more stuff/doing things differently. A family in grad school IS HARD, and you've gotta do what you've gotta do. <3 

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Thanks everyone! I think that is one of the hardest things about trying to get into PA school for me right now. Putting your life on hold to pursue a dream. I just don't want to bite off more than I can chew. It is my dream to go to PA school but I also want a family. I know at the end of the day you have to do what's best for your family but sometimes it's hard to know what that is!

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It's never the "perfect time" to go to PA school when you have children. 

It's a SACRIFICIAL INVESTMENT FOR A SEASON.

The most important thing is having a strong support system, whether it's a spouse, parents, friends, classmates, church, etc that can encourage you and help you achieve your goal.

Don't try to do this "solo."

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On 2/20/2018 at 7:44 PM, katieo said:

I’m trying to figure this out too. I’m wondering how soon after graduation I can start manufacturing babies. I figure the first few years out of school are the most important in terms of being available and focused. But those years are also gonna be the last few years of optimal reproductive health. It’s a lose-lose. 

Assuming you are a woman based on your profile name, and I seem to remember you mentioning you were in a UTI thread or something...maybe I shouldn't assume, but oh well.

I am 14 months out of school, and I am male.  My wife is currently pregnant and due in about 4.5 months - this will be our first.  Obviously I'm not taking on the brunt of the work right now, but from a time perspective and work I can say that I feel quite comfortable in my job and do not feel that my job will take away from home time any more than if I had several more years of experience.  I am still learning new things regularly and review databases and textbooks at times, but work is nothing like PA school.  There are times when I don't even know what to do with my free time because I no longer have to study for an exam.  It's wonderful.  So, I don't think you have to worry too much about waiting forever after PA school, but of course as a female you never know how the pregnancy will go.  My wife's has been relatively easy - mostly just fatigue and minor touches of nausea here and there.  My sister-in-law is currently on her 4th week of bed rest with at least 6 weeks more due to elevated BP and concerns for potential pre-eclampsia.  Can't really work as a PA, stay-at-home-mom, or anything when on strict bed rest - so you have to think about how your future job will respond if there is a complication.

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1 hour ago, mgriffiths said:

Assuming you are a woman based on your profile name, and I seem to remember you mentioning you were in a UTI thread or something...maybe I shouldn't assume, but oh well.

I am 14 months out of school, and I am male.  My wife is currently pregnant and due in about 4.5 months - this will be our first.  Obviously I'm not taking on the brunt of the work right now, but from a time perspective and work I can say that I feel quite comfortable in my job and do not feel that my job will take away from home time any more than if I had several more years of experience.  I am still learning new things regularly and review databases and textbooks at times, but work is nothing like PA school.  There are times when I don't even know what to do with my free time because I no longer have to study for an exam.  It's wonderful.  So, I don't think you have to worry too much about waiting forever after PA school, but of course as a female you never know how the pregnancy will go.  My wife's has been relatively easy - mostly just fatigue and minor touches of nausea here and there.  My sister-in-law is currently on her 4th week of bed rest with at least 6 weeks more due to elevated BP and concerns for potential pre-eclampsia.  Can't really work as a PA, stay-at-home-mom, or anything when on strict bed rest - so you have to think about how your future job will respond if there is a complication.

Exactly. I’m mostly concerned about being pregnant because it’s a gamble like you said. I imagine esp in the first year you’re building your foundation, so the idea of potentially being sick/on bed rest makes me nervous. But when I graduate I’ll be 31 so waiting makes me a little nervous too. I guess my loose plan is to give it a year out of school before I try. Thanks for your input. It’s really nice to hear you have plenty of time to spend with your family. Congrats on the baby on the way :)

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