Jump to content

Flight Medic vs Army Medic for Experience


Recommended Posts

I'm currently a reserve army medic going to school and working at a civilian hospital. I have the opportunity to become a flight medic but the training isn’t very practical for me right now since I am still trying to finish my bachelor's degree. Would being a flight medic over a standard army medic help me in the admissions process to PA school? Or would army medic be attractive enough?

A little background, my other experience includes 6 months patient transporter, 2 years Cath Lab CNA, 2 years Blood Draw Medical Assistant/Phlebotomist, 6 years Army Reserve Medic 

Thank you for any advice!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Honestly Flight Medic jobs are fantastic experience and are pretty hard to come by often times. My guess is you will get a lot more exposure in a shorter time period as a flight medic. All the medics I know that have working in rotor wing transport are some of the smartest medics I know and have taken care of patients that typical ground transport units will never see.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as I understand, (I'm guessing you're talking about civilian flight medic vs regular Army medic) Is that a regular Army medic (I was 11Bang-Bang) Is the equivalent of an EMT-Basic with some advanced trauma and IV therapy training.  Our medics were amazing and had exposure to lots of real life mass casualty and "trauma-1" type events.  However civilian flight medics are going to be EMT-P (paramedic) trained with several years of 911 experience, Critical Care and Flight Paramedic training and are pretty much the top echelon of EMS providers.  As far as Army flight medics I could not comment as to their level of training and experience but I would guess it's a little more strenuous than regular Army medics.  Any of the above though are great ways to get PCE, especially any type of military medicine since that's kind of how we got started as a profession.  As always it's what fits your personality and situation the best.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Similar Content

    • By winstonetwo
      I found some old post about this topic but only a few people were involved and it was from quite a few years back. I thought I'd bring it up again for more clarification for all.
      Looking for suggestions on how to/ how you enter military experience into CASPA.  What are your thoughts on dividing all of that up between medical and non-medical experience, training and schools, deployment vs. garrison, leadership roles, and awards? Did you add past certs that have since lapsed? Should it be broken down by each duty station or each title? Also, how did you quantify the number of hours and should it be one lump sum or divided up? Any thoughts would helpful.
    • By PerspiringPA
      Hello all,
      I'm brand new to this forum. I graduated with a degree in biology and a gpa of 3.52, and was planning to go to medical school the whole way through, while also thinking a lot about PA school. I was ready to apply to med school while I was finishing college, but decided to take some time away from the academic environment to make sure I really wanted to do med school. After almost a year of soul-searching, researching and deliberation (in addition to the last 4 years), I have finally decided that PA is a more appropriate career path for me. I had a great mcat score (93%) and I had all of the volunteer and leadership experience to make me a competitive applicant for med school. Now that I'm looking at PA schools, I need to get my direct patient care hours, take anatomy and physiology (I didn't do the whole series since medical schools don't require it), possibly take statistics, and possibly take the GRE.
      I have 400 hours of MA experience (not certified). I know the doctor personally and worked there for 4 months, I learned a lot but it was a very disorganized clinic. I have about 200 hours working as an EMT-B. I'm wondering if I should keep working as an EMT for a year and apply for the 2021 cycle once I take anatomy and physiology at my community college. I've looked at a lot of threads on the internet and from what I've found, paramedic is the best prep for being a PA; things like, "they were a head and shoulders above the rest of their class," and "they were very  experienced with patient assessments and had great clinical presence." I've also heard that it's unnecessary and a distraction if your end goal is PA. I want to be a paramedic and get real experience doing more advanced patient assessments, but it would push PA school at least 2 years back since I'd want to work for at least a year to make it worth it. Being an EMT entails a lot of driving and sitting around the station, and when I do get patient contacts, I'm not in charge unless it's a stable (BLS) patient.
      Should I take the time to become a paramedic and get really good experience or should I get as many EMT hours as possible in a year and then apply?
      Also, do schools look at how many hours I've worked or do they need to know how much time I spent doing patient care, versus driving and sitting around the station, and how do I record that?
       
      My other main question is whether I should take the GRE or just rely on my MCAT score and not apply to "GRE required" schools. I live in CA and would like to stay in California, or at least in the west (CA, OR, WA, CO, AZ, NV, NM). This might be a question for a separate thread. 
      I know this is a lot, but it's pretty much everything on my mind right now, please feel free to only answer a portion of it if you want. 
      Thanks so much for the help!
    • By seominky
      Hello! 
      I graduated from MSU with a Human Biology Major in Winter 2015.
      It has been about 3 years since i have graduated. I studied the MCAT and took the test once and did not apply to any med school because of my MCAT score and GPA.
      i have a GPA 3.0 and not sure about my science gpa about 2.7-2.9 
      I just got married this summer and have been rethinking about med school and wanted to go to PA school instead 
      It seems as competitive as med school but it is only 2 years of school. 
      I don't have ANY direct paid health care experience only volunteering and haven't taken the GRE yet 
      I am 25 years old and just need some help/guidance on the path. 
      so my questions are:
      1.) Should i go to graduate school for 2 years and get good grades to make up for my low GPA
      2.) Should i just get as much PCE as i can? and then apply ? 
      if so, which is better? CNA, MA, paramedic, EMT ? 
      3.) Lastly, should get certified to work as a CNA, MA, paramedic or EMT first, and then work while i go to grad school so i can get PCE and boost my GPA? 
       
      i don't know where to start because I'm trying to find the most affordable and less time consuming way to be competitive to get into PA school 😞 
       
      Thank you
       
       
    • By tcurtis14002
      I'm currently a reserve army medic going to school and working at a civilian hospital. I have the opportunity to become a flight medic but the training isn’t very practical for me right now since I am still trying to finish my bachelor's degree. Would being a flight medic over a standard army medic help me in the admissions process to PA school? Or would army medic be attractive enough? 
      A little background, my other experience includes 6 months patient transporter, 2 years Cath Lab CNA, 2 years Blood Draw Medical Assistant/Phlebotomist, 6 years Army Reserve Medic 
      Thank you for any advice!
    • By gabrielled
      Hello,
      I am currently in the 3rd semester of my paramedic course, and a senior in college.  I will be graduating in May 2018 with a BS is kinesiology, with an expected GPA of about 3.6, with a science GPA of about 3.35.  I will also have completed my paramedic course, along with the national registration as well.  By the time I apply in September, 2018, I will have just over 2000 as an EMT-B and EMT-P. I am a little concerned with the GPA's, as they are average, and it seems that all the schools average for acceptance are about 3.8 or higher.  Do I have a chance of getting in?  
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More