Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ollivander

I just started a new job and I've immediately noticed I have trouble with small talk

Recommended Posts

I just got hired on a medical assistant in the OR, and I've immediately noticed that I struggle with small talk like the rest of the staff seems to excel at. I've been so stressed keeping up with the pace of all of the tasks and skills I'm expected to learn in a short amount of time in order to function in the role they've assigned to me that I'm starting to become aware that I'm being very stand-offish during their conversations. Is this a big issue in healthcare? I'm more focused on what I need to do next for the patient or the physician that I can't process chit chatting while doing that. I've just started to become concerned about it and wanted to see what this forum thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a PA, you will need to build rapport quickly with new people. Maybe relax a bit and stop stressing so much. Your colleagues are your work family; enjoy them. Maybe pick out one person there to start with.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think once you have mastered your job duties/functions you will get more comfortable and be able to come out of your shell more. The first few weeks-months at a new job isn't the ideal time to do self analysis. Everyone is a little awkward and out-of-place right at first. It'll get better!

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just like how you need to master your work duties by practicing and actively working to improve the skills, people skills require just as much attention. Given, for some people talking and conversing comes natural, but for many it requires more time. My point, don't beat yourself too much over this. You've identified the issue, now as mich above suggested, start with one coworker. New places are always awkward at first, being the only new person there. This is the time to improve your small talks skills. It will come in handy during interviews. 

Good luck. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Come up with a few stock questions to ask the patient.  Things like "Do you live in the city, or in the suburbs"?, or "Did you have trouble finding parking?", or "Have you recovered from the holidays yet?" should work.  When they answer, build on their response by asking another question, like "Did you go anywhere fun for Christmas?".  It will get easier in time.  I'm not an amazing conversationalist, but I do ok at work because the breadth of small talk topics isn't very wide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, jlumsden said:

Come up with a few stock questions to ask the patient.  Things like "Do you live in the city, or in the suburbs"?, or "Did you have trouble finding parking?", or "Have you recovered from the holidays yet?" should work.  When they answer, build on their response by asking another question, like "Did you go anywhere fun for Christmas?".  It will get easier in time.  I'm not an amazing conversationalist, but I do ok at work because the breadth of small talk topics isn't very wide.

It's more so with coworkers as opposed to patients. Conversing with patients is much easier because the window you see them for is much smaller.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree this takes time (at least for me to get comfortable enough). If your looking for conversation starters try listening to other people’s conversations. Then later incorporate same information in your conversations. For example people talk about vacations before they go. Once they return ask about how the vacation went. Or ask if they have seen latest movie. Some people like talking about their kids, you could ask what their kids are doing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Majesticu
      Hey guys,
      I'm currently considering applying next year and was wondering if anyone could share their stats for getting into nova or any other school in florida, especially how many pce hours, since they don't seem to require it but I'm not sure how many most applicants have.
    • By aa1041557
      I’ve recently been offered a position as a dialysis tech in an outpatient center. I shadowed the other day and the staff seamed friendly. My main duties would be weighing patients, cannulating them and setting up the machines, drawing labs, and monitoring their vitals throughout treatment. This all would be under the supervisions of an RN. I would work 8 and 10 hour shifts. I was hoping someone who has worked as a dialysis tech or knows someone who has could give me feedback about their experiences. I do already have 2 years experience volunteering as an EMT-A on a fairly busy service and plan on continuing to do so.  
       
      I have also been invited to interview for a medical assistant position at an urgent care, but the interview is after the deadline to decide if I’m going to accept the dialysis position. 
       
      The pros I see in working as a dialysis tech: Getting to know my patients and their cases. Experience in the chronic disease side of medicine. 
       
      Cons: It’s could be repetitive work and I would really only learn about kidney disease.
    • By PANCEon
      I wish at 18, I would've chosen the pre-pa route and gotten an associate's degree in DMS or an echo cardiogram tech then continued to get certified in different specialties. I may have taken pre med courses as well. Became a CNA and worked in many different specialties, hospitals, hospice, nursing and rehab facilities for experience, money, connections, letters of recommendation, on the job training to get certified in imaging, phlebotomy, resp tech, occupational or physical therapy technicians, basic EMT 1-IV, ER tech, pharmacy tech, and become a American Red Cross CNA trainer or at least CPR, AED, BLS, first aid and phlebotomy instructor's. Setting up blood drives, charity events etc. Too many ideas to count. I know now that being a healthcare professional  is my calling. Some ppl can just play the piano, which I can't, but medicine/biology/anatomy, makes perfect sense. But, I'm 40 now, and my Psychology degree I got in 2001 afforded me sales positions from food broker territory manager, pharmaceutical sales, animal diagnostic laboratory sales manager. I worked from home and travelled all over. I liked being my own boss, and other's as well. I then became a seller and writer of mortgages. Now, I have been on disability for 10yrs and am ready to do what I was meant to. I just wish I was younger. That's why it's important for me to manage my time and not waste a minute doing something that isn't going to help me get in a program. 
       
       
       
    • By PerspiringPA
      Hello all,
      I'm brand new to this forum. I graduated with a degree in biology and a gpa of 3.52, and was planning to go to medical school the whole way through, while also thinking a lot about PA school. I was ready to apply to med school while I was finishing college, but decided to take some time away from the academic environment to make sure I really wanted to do med school. After almost a year of soul-searching, researching and deliberation (in addition to the last 4 years), I have finally decided that PA is a more appropriate career path for me. I had a great mcat score (93%) and I had all of the volunteer and leadership experience to make me a competitive applicant for med school. Now that I'm looking at PA schools, I need to get my direct patient care hours, take anatomy and physiology (I didn't do the whole series since medical schools don't require it), possibly take statistics, and possibly take the GRE.
      I have 400 hours of MA experience (not certified). I know the doctor personally and worked there for 4 months, I learned a lot but it was a very disorganized clinic. I have about 200 hours working as an EMT-B. I'm wondering if I should keep working as an EMT for a year and apply for the 2021 cycle once I take anatomy and physiology at my community college. I've looked at a lot of threads on the internet and from what I've found, paramedic is the best prep for being a PA; things like, "they were a head and shoulders above the rest of their class," and "they were very  experienced with patient assessments and had great clinical presence." I've also heard that it's unnecessary and a distraction if your end goal is PA. I want to be a paramedic and get real experience doing more advanced patient assessments, but it would push PA school at least 2 years back since I'd want to work for at least a year to make it worth it. Being an EMT entails a lot of driving and sitting around the station, and when I do get patient contacts, I'm not in charge unless it's a stable (BLS) patient.
      Should I take the time to become a paramedic and get really good experience or should I get as many EMT hours as possible in a year and then apply?
      Also, do schools look at how many hours I've worked or do they need to know how much time I spent doing patient care, versus driving and sitting around the station, and how do I record that?
       
      My other main question is whether I should take the GRE or just rely on my MCAT score and not apply to "GRE required" schools. I live in CA and would like to stay in California, or at least in the west (CA, OR, WA, CO, AZ, NV, NM). This might be a question for a separate thread. 
      I know this is a lot, but it's pretty much everything on my mind right now, please feel free to only answer a portion of it if you want. 
      Thanks so much for the help!
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More