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corpsman89

The Benefits of Changing our Title -- The Time is NOW!

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8 hours ago, jwells78 said:

Before we do the name change thingy, maybe we could get some of the hospitals   and clinics in the US to add PA's to their list of medical personnel first?

 

Cant remember the last time I read a hospital website  ER description and saw "PA" listed anywhere in there.  Maybe never.  Get the hospitals and clinics to identify us, them I'm taking a party bus to DC and we will stop at every med school on the way and arm-wrestle the MS3's for political exposure.

 

After that, you guys can change the name.  But keep the initials similar:

(And Yes, physician associate SUCKS.  Makes me think of a gold-chain endowed chicago bookie in track pants or something)

maybe:

AP - Advanced Practitioner/Provider

AP- Allopathic provider

AMP- Advanced Medical Practitioner

 

Or my favorite:

PIMP- Physician-Intermediate Medical Provider

 

 

 

ROFL!!! PIMP just shot to the top of my list! hahahaha

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I went to PA school I n the early 90s and the common wisdom was that within 10 years we would have both a name change to physician associate and a bridge program with no mcat to become physicians. well, 1/2 right I guess, but in reverse order expected...we do need to the rid of the assistant in our title. Historically and to be in line with our colleagues in the UK, Physician Associate makes the most sense, but I can understand concerns about keeping physician in the name. I can't say I know the answer at this point, only can say a name change is needed as we are no one's assistants and the name is dragging us down on every front.

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7 hours ago, EMEDPA said:

I went to PA school I n the early 90s and the common wisdom was that within 10 years we would have both a name change to physician associate and a bridge program with no mcat to become physicians. well, 1/2 right I guess, but in reverse order expected...we do need to the rid of the assistant in our title. Historically and to be in line with our colleagues in the UK, Physician Associate makes the most sense, but I can understand concerns about keeping physician in the name. I can't say I know the answer at this point, only can say a name change is needed as we are no one's assistants and the name is dragging us down on every front.

I came within a hair's breath of going to a Caribbean medical school in the late 90's after PA school.  It would of been slightly abbreviated and no MCAT. After getting creamed in PA school (time wise), my wife was not onboard.  That was enough for me to say no.  Looking back, I should of done it.  I honestly believed we would of had a name change by the early 2000's.  If you would of told me in the early 90's during PA school that in 25 years we would still be listed as "Assistants", 1.  I would not of believed it, and 2.  I would not of became a PA.

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ROFL!!! PIMP just shot to the top of my list! hahahaha
I agree I got my undergrad degree with a major in Pimpology and a minor in Mackenomics...

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7 hours ago, Joelseff said:

I agree I got my undergrad degree with a major in Pimpology and a minor in Mackenomics... emoji16.pngemoji41.png

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My name is Velvet Jones and I'm your PIMP today...

SK

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My name is Velvet Jones and I'm your PIMP today...
SK
"who wrote the book of love? Velvet... It's as simple as that..."

Let's see who gets this reference lol. I watched this as a kid and I have the DVD!

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7 hours ago, sk732 said:

My name is Velvet Jones and I'm your PIMP today...

SK

I just shot soda out my nose (not my best look). :) 

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"who wrote the book of love? Velvet... It's as simple as that..."

Let's see who gets this reference lol. I watched this as a kid and I have the DVD!

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Is that like VJ’s home course “How To Be a Ho”?


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On 12/25/2017 at 0:10 AM, EMEDPA said:

my only issue with MP is that it sounds too much like NP....

EXACTLY!!

As much as I hate to be associated with NPs its honestly what we need right now. Can we really manage to let our selves be degraded because the public thinks we have LESS training than NPs? We need a name that will equate us with NPs. Yes, I understand that our training is generally superior to NPs but the public and legislature does not think this with a name like Physician Assistant or even Physician Associate. Its all about perception! 

Changing our name to Medical Practitioner would more or less rock the boats, but it would generate a conversation about our name and about what we do and about our extensive and standardized training unlike our NP colleagues. 

We are already associated with NPs but I think the vast majority of the public believes that NP>PA. With a name change to MP I think the tide would change to MP>NP, or at the very least MP=NP. Both would be beneficial. 

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13 hours ago, corpsman89 said:

EXACTLY!!

As much as I hate to be associated with NPs its honestly what we need right now. Can we really manage to let our selves be degraded because the public thinks we have LESS training than NPs? We need a name that will equate us with NPs. Yes, I understand that our training is generally superior to NPs but the public and legislature does not think this with a name like Physician Assistant or even Physician Associate. Its all about perception! 

Changing our name to Medical Practitioner would more or less rock the boats, but it would generate a conversation about our name and about what we do and about our extensive and standardized training unlike our NP colleagues. 

We are already associated with NPs but I think the vast majority of the public believes that NP>PA. With a name change to MP I think the tide would change to MP>NP, or at the very least MP=NP. Both would be beneficial. 

I honestly don't like that name at all; it sounds too much like a medical assistant. Physician associate is truly the best name to describe your profession, but the MD/DOs will likely never let that happen. Same thing for the degrees that are given; every program should be giving an MMS degree, but there are still many programs that give the MPAS. An MPAS doesn't even make sense. 

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3 hours ago, 2234leej said:

I honestly don't like that name at all; it sounds too much like a medical assistant. Physician associate is truly the best name to describe your profession, but the MD/DOs will likely never let that happen. Same thing for the degrees that are given; every program should be giving an MMS degree, but there are still many programs that give the MPAS. An MPAS doesn't even make sense. 

Physician Associate doesn't make sense either. 

Medical Practitioner does make sense, and if programs decided to actually make the switch and award MMS then Medical Practitioner would make even MORE sense. 

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4 hours ago, 2234leej said:

I honestly don't like that name at all; it sounds too much like a medical assistant. Physician associate is truly the best name to describe your profession, but the MD/DOs will likely never let that happen. Same thing for the degrees that are given; every program should be giving an MMS degree, but there are still many programs that give the MPAS. An MPAS doesn't even make sense. 

I guess medical doctor sounds too much like medical assistant too then...

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As much as being on the colder side of the border, so odds of us changing names anytime soon are low, this pooped up on my Twitter feed from West Virginia...despite the dude being interviewed clearly dropping the possessive, the reporters and their editors continue to use it.    http://www.wdtv.com/content/news/Health-Alert-Physicians-Assistants-465967233.html

Being a bit of a pedant, it annoys the phuque out of me...

 

SK

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From my humble student perspective, Medical Practitioner is the name of choice.

But regardless of what the name might become, does anyone have a good idea on what it would actually take to make a name change happen?  What's the first step? Does AAPA need to take the lead?  If not, then who?  It seems many agree the name needs to be changed I just wonder how does the movement get started? 

 

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From my limited understanding, I think AAPA would take the lead by sending out surveys to practicing PAs, and PA students to get their feed back on the issue. First, they would need to see if the profession WANTS to change the name, then they would need to assess what the profession wants to change the name to. Once the profession is set on a name they would vote for it at the annual gathering. Basically, what they did with OTP. 

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Great discussion. I'm glad we are all engage in this cause. After all, it is our duty to be proactive and fight for our rights and the future of our profession. 

Here is my take on this.

  1. All PA programs shall now be the standard "more or less 27 months" + 1 year residency like the Lynchburg model, leading to a Doctorate degree which I proposed be called DMP to sort of mirror the DNP model.
  2. Our new title shall be Medical Practitioners and the medical workforce shall now be comprised of 4 different type of Doctors or Providers:
  • Dr. John Doe, MD. 
  • Dr John Doe, DO
  • Dr. John Doe, DMP
  • Dr. John Doe, DNP

I believe the added residency requirement will bring about 2 major changes to our profession and degree. First, It will definitely highlight the superiority of the PA education to the NP. Second, it will sealed the concept that PA education closely mirror Medical school training. This will gradually efface any association of PAs with NPs among the general population. 

There also has to be a national movement by PAs to make these changes known to the public and lawmakers through education, advertising, etc... so they know who we are, what we do, and what education and experiences are required to be a MP.

 

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8 hours ago, Dichotomy said:

Great discussion. I'm glad we are all engage in this cause. After all, it is our duty to be proactive and fight for our rights and the future of our profession. 

Here is my take on this.

  1. All PA programs shall now be the standard "more or less 27 months" + 1 year residency like the Lynchburg model, leading to a Doctorate degree which I proposed be called DMP to sort of mirror the DNP model.
  2. Our new title shall be Medical Practitioners and the medical workforce shall now be comprised of 4 different type of Doctors or Providers:
  • Dr. John Doe, MD. 
  • Dr John Doe, DO
  • Dr. John Doe, DMP
  • Dr. John Doe, DNP

I believe the added residency requirement will bring about 2 major changes to our profession and degree. First, It will definitely highlight the superiority of the PA education to the NP. Second, it will sealed the concept that PA education closely mirror Medical school training. This will gradually efface any association of PAs with NPs among the general population. 

There also has to be a national movement by PAs to make these changes known to the public and lawmakers through education, advertising, etc... so they know who we are, what we do, and what education and experiences are required to be a MP.

 

Its to bad we have to start thinking about doctorates degrees, but we really have no choice considering practically every other degree (NPs, PTs, etc) have moved on from masters to Doctorates. We basically have to make the move out of necessity so that we aren't marginalized by the public and the legislative system. 

I do think residencies would be nice, especially considering many PA students now enter into PA school with really not much experience. Residencies would completely solve this dilemma. My worry is that it will be hard to find enough residency positions for all PA students. That is indeed the problem that physicians have now. 

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I think that if there was a move made to a model of 2.5-3 + 1 yr residency then the residency seats would grow in number. Unfortunately it seems the days of being able to switch specialties is over. There is simply to much to know and to learn in each area. Therefore why not have residencies or fellowships (whatever you want to call them). The thing I don't want to see is a move to a Doctoral degree with any more didactic requirements. If we are making that move then award a Masters at the end of school and the Doctoral degree comes at the end of your clinical residency and broaden the number of CAQ specialties. This would give PAs a far superior training background and would put our training closer to that of an MD/DO.

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On 1/1/2018 at 3:06 PM, corpsman89 said:

From my limited understanding, I think AAPA would take the lead by sending out surveys to practicing PAs, and PA students to get their feed back on the issue. First, they would need to see if the profession WANTS to change the name, then they would need to assess what the profession wants to change the name to. Once the profession is set on a name they would vote for it at the annual gathering. Basically, what they did with OTP. 

emedpa or jmj, didn’t we survey this way back? I seem to recall a survey with obviously biased (against the change) wording that showed a plurality wanted a change? Something like 45% was for, and like 30% against with 6,000 respondents? Trying to find it, but can’t pull it up.

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Great discussion. I'm glad we are all engage in this cause. After all, it is our duty to be proactive and fight for our rights and the future of our profession. 
Here is my take on this.
  1. All PA programs shall now be the standard "more or less 27 months" + 1 year residency like the Lynchburg model, leading to a Doctorate degree which I proposed be called DMP to sort of mirror the DNP model.
  2. Our new title shall be Medical Practitioners and the medical workforce shall now be comprised of 4 different type of Doctors or Providers:
  • Dr. John Doe, MD. 
  • Dr John Doe, DO
  • Dr. John Doe, DMP
  • Dr. John Doe, DNP
I believe the added residency requirement will bring about 2 major changes to our profession and degree. First, It will definitely highlight the superiority of the PA education to the NP. Second, it will sealed the concept that PA education closely mirror Medical school training. This will gradually efface any association of PAs with NPs among the general population. 
There also has to be a national movement by PAs to make these changes known to the public and lawmakers through education, advertising, etc... so they know who we are, what we do, and what education and experiences are required to be a MP.
 
Ok... Make it so...

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6 hours ago, LT_Oneal_PAC said:

emedpa or jmj, didn’t we survey this way back? I seem to recall a survey with obviously biased wording that showed a plurality wanted a change? Something like 45% was for, and like 30% against with 6,000 respondents? Trying to find it, but can’t pull it up.

6500 FOLKS signed the petition(not survey) in 3 months. the year before PAFT was founded. the folks circulating the petition became the founding board members of PAFT. AAPA did a survey with something like 48% for, 35% against, and the rest undecided, which they spun as " a majority did not favor name change" because a "majority" said no or didn't know. bad use of stats...

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6 hours ago, EMEDPA said:

6500 FOLKS signed the petition(not survey) in 3 months. the year before PAFT was founded. the folks circulating the petition became the founding board members of PAFT. AAPA did a survey with something like 48% for, 35% against, and the rest undecided, which they spun as " a majority did not favor name change" because a "majority" said no or didn't know. bad use of stats...

Thanks! I remembered the petition that we signed to form PAFT and found that, but for the life of me couldn’t find the survey showing the plurality.

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