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how would you handle these job application issues?


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Looking for opinions on how you handle certain job application issues...


For a little background, I am an experienced PA - worked in my first job for 2.5 years and am currently in my second job for 1.5 years so far. Both are highly specialized - first was pediatric interventional cardiology (i.e. cath lab/EP) and second is pediatric cardiac ICU. I am on the job hunt as my husband and I would like to move back to Philadelphia (location of job#1), and I miss being in a procedural environment. Ok, now onto my questions:


1.  When applying to a position, do you typically use a resume or CV? I realize in the physician world it is exclusively CVs but I'm not sure if that translates to the APP world as sometimes I've dealt with nurse recruiters. I don't have much in the way of research, but I did present a poster at a conference, and I worked as a lab assistant before PA school so while my name isn't published on any of that research, I can include the papers in which I helped in the lab/gathering data.
2.  In the past, I have always kept positions in chronological order since each subsequent position has been more relevant than the last; however now I am in the situation where I am applying to a position where job #1 is more relevant. Would you still keep it chronological or put the more relevant info first? (I suppose your answer to question 1 might influence this one.)
3.  I am applying to a job in a state where I previously held a license but it is no longer active. Do I put my inactive license info on my resume/CV? Do I renew it now, not knowing if I'll get the job just to show I am serious about it? Or do I leave it off completely and just list my current, out-of-state license?
4.  This one is a little more specific... When I worked in interventional cardiology (job #1), our hospital was building and interventional radiology program. Adult IR physicians from a neighboring hospital were contracted to come and do cases, utilizing our lab and our staff. While I was not credentialed to work with these physicians, I got a lot of exposure to the field through helping with coordination of cases, helping the physicians with the fluoro equipment, suggested supplies they could utilize during cases, helping with the ultrasound machine, etc. After helping with these sorts of activities for several months, I was told by a new director of APPs that this was not something I should legally be doing, even though I was not involved directly with patient care, so I stopped. About 6 months later, I left for job #2. Now, I am applying for a peds IR job and would like to put this exposure on my resume/CV - should I? Was this director being overly cautious or will it look bad that I am referencing experience in a field in which I was not credentialed?


Any and all advice or experience would be greatly appreciated! :]

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4 hours ago, lauraadora said:

Looking for opinions on how you handle certain job application issues...


For a little background, I am an experienced PA - worked in my first job for 2.5 years and am currently in my second job for 1.5 years so far. Both are highly specialized - first was pediatric interventional cardiology (i.e. cath lab/EP) and second is pediatric cardiac ICU. I am on the job hunt as my husband and I would like to move back to Philadelphia (location of job#1), and I miss being in a procedural environment. Ok, now onto my questions:


1.  When applying to a position, do you typically use a resume or CV? I realize in the physician world it is exclusively CVs but I'm not sure if that translates to the APP world as sometimes I've dealt with nurse recruiters. I don't have much in the way of research, but I did present a poster at a conference, and I worked as a lab assistant before PA school so while my name isn't published on any of that research, I can include the papers in which I helped in the lab/gathering data.

The layout and focus is the different between them.  A CV is generally considered to have more of an academic and accomplishment focus.  A resume is more past/current job experience.  I don't have any research or publications.  So, I just list education, employment, academics (i.e. teaching affiliations), licensure/certifications.  A job CV that isn't academic or research focused should be less lengthy in my opinion when applying for a clinical job.  It depends on who is reading it.  When I have been in charge of hiring I don't care what you've published unless it directly related to the clinical job.  So, if the gathering of data doesn't apply to this position, I wouldn't find it important to list.  Just my opinion.


2.  In the past, I have always kept positions in chronological order since each subsequent position has been more relevant than the last; however now I am in the situation where I am applying to a position where job #1 is more relevant. Would you still keep it chronological or put the more relevant info first? (I suppose your answer to question 1 might influence this one.)

I think you should stick with chronological order.  If you include a cover letter, then you can highlight your past relevant experience in that. 


3.  I am applying to a job in a state where I previously held a license but it is no longer active. Do I put my inactive license info on my resume/CV? Do I renew it now, not knowing if I'll get the job just to show I am serious about it? Or do I leave it off completely and just list my current, out-of-state license?

In general I think employers want people with an active license or at least to know it is being processed.  If you are serious about wanting a job in this state, then you should get working on having an active license.  You could then list the license just either as pending (as if applying for a new license) or list that you are inactive pending reactivation.  So, in my opinion, having an inactive license is not beneficial information to the employer.  They likely want to see you have an active license or that it is pending. 


4.  This one is a little more specific... When I worked in interventional cardiology (job #1), our hospital was building and interventional radiology program. Adult IR physicians from a neighboring hospital were contracted to come and do cases, utilizing our lab and our staff. While I was not credentialed to work with these physicians, I got a lot of exposure to the field through helping with coordination of cases, helping the physicians with the fluoro equipment, suggested supplies they could utilize during cases, helping with the ultrasound machine, etc. After helping with these sorts of activities for several months, I was told by a new director of APPs that this was not something I should legally be doing, even though I was not involved directly with patient care, so I stopped. About 6 months later, I left for job #2. Now, I am applying for a peds IR job and would like to put this exposure on my resume/CV - should I? Was this director being overly cautious or will it look bad that I am referencing experience in a field in which I was not credentialed?

I agree with your viewpoint that there is nothing wrong with what you were doing.  You were not directly involved with the patient.  It is like showing a new provider where the bathroom is and how the coffee machine works.  In your case you were just showing them where the fluoro was.  What you did is relevant to this new position you want.  So, I would list this experience.  Maybe a brief discussion in your cover letter could cover this experience. 

4 hours ago, lauraadora said:

 

 

 

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