Jump to content

Recommended Posts

So I applied to a dual degree program. They rejected me for PA but accepted me into their MPH. I think public health is interesting but I wouldn't say it's a huge passion of mine. I thought a good backup plan if I don't get into PA this cycle is to just do the MPH. Not sure how it will play out as I am still waiting on a ton of schools. It's in a great area, so I know I'll like being at that school, and the opportunities are great in the MPH program. However, I'm also concerned about being in a bucketload of debt with two master's degrees by the time I finish, but at the same time moving out of home and scrambling for a bunch of jobs and volunteer work to afford rent and living expenses seems very stressful(my other backup plan). Would it be better to pursue the master's or just work for another year or two, if worst case scenario I don't get into PA school this cycle?

Link to post
Share on other sites

That a tough question as you are still waiting on decisions from schools by the sounds of things. An MPH is not a bad way to improve your application, is it a one year program?

If it is more than a year and you feel that your application is already strong academically, I would say work for another year. Perhaps take a couple classes to slightly bump your GPA.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, EMEDPA said:

MPH + other classes or MPH + volunteer or part time job.

I'm guessing if you do well in the MPH you would be a shoe in for their pa program the next cycle.

That's a good idea! I heard their MPH is actually pretty laid back, I could try to get shadowing and volunteer on the side. Their PAs take an accelerated version of the program in one year instead of two, maybe if I can double my course load it would save time and I'd have contacts in the program to reapply?

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, milesHenson1 said:

That a tough question as you are still waiting on decisions from schools by the sounds of things. An MPH is not a bad way to improve your application, is it a one year program?

If it is more than a year and you feel that your application is already strong academically, I would say work for another year. Perhaps take a couple classes to slightly bump your GPA.

It's two years long. The dual degree students do the MPH in one year though. I have a couple of poor grades but not many, I also don't have a competitive level of HCE, so I'm kind of curious if having an MPH would look better than just having a ton of hours?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, silverstarlight said:

It's two years long. The dual degree students do the MPH in one year though. I have a couple of poor grades but not many, I also don't have a competitive level of HCE, so I'm kind of curious if having an MPH would look better than just having a ton of hours?

The MPH may give you a better shot at getting into that PA program, provided you do well. However not having HCE may also hurt your chances at other schools. Would it be possible to work part time while you are doing the MPH? That way you get the best of both worlds, an MPH and roughly one year more of HCE.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Current MPH graduate here, who is also attending PA school this next May. I can honestly say it was one of the best decisions I have made. Yes, it will be a struggle obtaining HCE while in the program full-time, but that's not to say having research experience isn't a great substitute if you expect to meet or exceed minimum HCE requirements for your programs of interest; I did both research and accrued HCE as a part-timer on the weekends. During your practicum or thesis, most of the coursework is out of the way and it provides a solid semester where you can extend the amount of HCE hrs you'd like to garner. Expenses are a whole different animal, but depending on the program there should be some scholarship opportunities both on acceptance and within the program once you have started. To name a few, my program in particular offered numerous GRA's, department-specific student excellence scholarships, and a handful of global health research grants.

Many topics in public health (population health dynamics, epidemiology, critical appraisal of literature, environmental health, health policy, etc) are increasingly relevant to medical practice, in particular the more community-oriented PA provider model. As we see it, public health encompasses all crucial social and human challenges. My time as an MPH student really solidified for me why I cherished the PA route over any other occupation, and also provided me with a wonderful set of tangible and critical thinking skills to be more successful in practice. DM me if you'd like to hear more about my experiences and opportunities when I was a student in the program. Lastly, I was able to reflect and fall back on my experiences as a public health student many times during personal statements, secondary app essays and interview questions, and it has gifted me with lots of success this application cycle.

Here is a link to an article that I believe does a great job of weighing the benefits/costs to pursuing a dual MPH/PA degree: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22070060

Best of luck!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Similar Content

    • By masval2
      Hello!
      I have browsing this forum for awhile and appreciate everyones time and advice.
      To explain a little about my situation, I have a BA in Kinesiology that i completed in 2016. I became a personal trainer after school and really fell in love with client interactions, but felt as though I could do more for myself and my career. I went back to complete some science pre requisites for Physical Therapy school but realized DPT wasn't for me. I decided to leave my job at the commercial training job to work with partners/friends at a private training gym that we started together. This was tough at the time, and unfortunately COVID ruined our business, and lost my job.
      I was lost, bitter and decided I no longer wanted to be a trainer anymore. I hate the business side of it after grinding in that sector for years, but love working with patients and healthcare. I wanted more for my life. My family is full of medical professionals and always loved the healthcare environment. I decided to go back to school online while locked down to keep me busy and learning more about health. I was accepted into an MS of kinesiology and have been realizing that its not as fun for me as it used to be since I want something different. I am fully intending to apply to PA school next year after I finish my masters and remaining pre-reqs this summer.
      With that being said, I currently have the option to switch my graduate focus from MS Kinesiology to MS Health Sciences, which has courses in Epidemiology, Global Health, Theories and models of health behaviors, Program design and evaluation, etc.
      I emailed my advisor to make the switch as I feel as though it will make my application stronger for PA school, but am now unsure if it will make a difference between MS Kine or Health Sciences. 
      Any thoughts or comments?
      Thank you so much for your time
    • By lilyclare
      Hello. To begin, I apologize if this question has been asked before, but I could not find the information I needed for my situation. Google results articles are incredibly vague so hopefully speaking to people will be better for me!
      I am an undergraduate pre-PA student. I am interested in going through the military for PA school. I do not have any military involvement at this point in time. Do they train people with a bachelor's degree, is it paid for, how many years of service will I be committed to? The little information I could find online leads me to believe they only train people who are already in service, but I've been told otherwise by people who kind of know what they are talking about, kind of not. Any answers to the questions above or any related questions I might have forgotten would be greatly appreciated! 
    • By Lidia86
      Hello everyone. I would like to hear your opinions on online lab classes due to the Covid-19 situation right now. So I’m enrolled in general chemistry with an online lab, and I am contemplating on dropping the class because I’m afraid schools won’t accept it. (Also waist of time and money) Thanks for your opinions. 
    • By Andrea1020
      So I recently found a job that would work well with my schedule as a CNA covid tester. It entails testing patients and going through screening questions with patients then reporting results to the supervisor.  I am a little worried because I don’t really want to go for the job if it isn’t considered PCE. Has anyone have any info on whether or not this is PCE or HCE?
    • By itskimchi
      I'm looking into PA school requirements and have seen that most require Human Anatomy & lab, and Human Physiology & lab. My current university (UCSD) only offers a Human Physiology lecture course. Most of the city colleges I'm looking into in order to fulfill this pre-req only offer Human Anatomy or Human Physiology as a single course of lecture and lab, rather than having separate lecture and lab courses. Do PA schools accept lecture & lab combination courses or do they want each lecture and lab to be a separate course?
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More