Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
silverstarlight

MPH program vs working for two years?

Recommended Posts

So I applied to a dual degree program. They rejected me for PA but accepted me into their MPH. I think public health is interesting but I wouldn't say it's a huge passion of mine. I thought a good backup plan if I don't get into PA this cycle is to just do the MPH. Not sure how it will play out as I am still waiting on a ton of schools. It's in a great area, so I know I'll like being at that school, and the opportunities are great in the MPH program. However, I'm also concerned about being in a bucketload of debt with two master's degrees by the time I finish, but at the same time moving out of home and scrambling for a bunch of jobs and volunteer work to afford rent and living expenses seems very stressful(my other backup plan). Would it be better to pursue the master's or just work for another year or two, if worst case scenario I don't get into PA school this cycle?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That a tough question as you are still waiting on decisions from schools by the sounds of things. An MPH is not a bad way to improve your application, is it a one year program?

If it is more than a year and you feel that your application is already strong academically, I would say work for another year. Perhaps take a couple classes to slightly bump your GPA.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MPH + other classes or MPH + volunteer or part time job.

I'm guessing if you do well in the MPH you would be a shoe in for their pa program the next cycle.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, EMEDPA said:

MPH + other classes or MPH + volunteer or part time job.

I'm guessing if you do well in the MPH you would be a shoe in for their pa program the next cycle.

That's a good idea! I heard their MPH is actually pretty laid back, I could try to get shadowing and volunteer on the side. Their PAs take an accelerated version of the program in one year instead of two, maybe if I can double my course load it would save time and I'd have contacts in the program to reapply?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, milesHenson1 said:

That a tough question as you are still waiting on decisions from schools by the sounds of things. An MPH is not a bad way to improve your application, is it a one year program?

If it is more than a year and you feel that your application is already strong academically, I would say work for another year. Perhaps take a couple classes to slightly bump your GPA.

It's two years long. The dual degree students do the MPH in one year though. I have a couple of poor grades but not many, I also don't have a competitive level of HCE, so I'm kind of curious if having an MPH would look better than just having a ton of hours?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, silverstarlight said:

It's two years long. The dual degree students do the MPH in one year though. I have a couple of poor grades but not many, I also don't have a competitive level of HCE, so I'm kind of curious if having an MPH would look better than just having a ton of hours?

The MPH may give you a better shot at getting into that PA program, provided you do well. However not having HCE may also hurt your chances at other schools. Would it be possible to work part time while you are doing the MPH? That way you get the best of both worlds, an MPH and roughly one year more of HCE.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Current MPH graduate here, who is also attending PA school this next May. I can honestly say it was one of the best decisions I have made. Yes, it will be a struggle obtaining HCE while in the program full-time, but that's not to say having research experience isn't a great substitute if you expect to meet or exceed minimum HCE requirements for your programs of interest; I did both research and accrued HCE as a part-timer on the weekends. During your practicum or thesis, most of the coursework is out of the way and it provides a solid semester where you can extend the amount of HCE hrs you'd like to garner. Expenses are a whole different animal, but depending on the program there should be some scholarship opportunities both on acceptance and within the program once you have started. To name a few, my program in particular offered numerous GRA's, department-specific student excellence scholarships, and a handful of global health research grants.

Many topics in public health (population health dynamics, epidemiology, critical appraisal of literature, environmental health, health policy, etc) are increasingly relevant to medical practice, in particular the more community-oriented PA provider model. As we see it, public health encompasses all crucial social and human challenges. My time as an MPH student really solidified for me why I cherished the PA route over any other occupation, and also provided me with a wonderful set of tangible and critical thinking skills to be more successful in practice. DM me if you'd like to hear more about my experiences and opportunities when I was a student in the program. Lastly, I was able to reflect and fall back on my experiences as a public health student many times during personal statements, secondary app essays and interview questions, and it has gifted me with lots of success this application cycle.

Here is a link to an article that I believe does a great job of weighing the benefits/costs to pursuing a dual MPH/PA degree: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22070060

Best of luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By am12345
      Hi All!
      I am a graduate student in public health and have worked with providers to inform patient care plans as well as screen patients for adverse childhood experiences, resiliency, quality of life, etc... I have not been an EMT, CNA, Aid, or other roles that are usually seen with direct patient care experience for PA schools. I have already submitted my application, but after attending an information session I am nervous that schools will not count my public health hours as patient care (I made the mistake of listing them as health care experience and not patient care experience). Does anyone have any thoughts on this process? I have already reached out to one school directly and added the experiences as patient care experience in CASPA (it lets you do this even after submission, but I do not know what happens next). I do have a lot of healthcare experience and research experience. Have anyone else added experiences after they submitted? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Feel free to private message if that is better for you. Thanks so much! I really appreciate any support with this!
    • By sacharle
      There is an awesome organization called ThePAC (Physician Assistants of Color) that holds diversity events in multiple cities across the U.S. The next one will be in Detroit, Michigan on September 28, 2019. The event is a great opportunity for all three levels of the profession! https://www.eventbrite.com/e/thepac-takes-detroit-tickets-70091765357
      Pre-PAs get to talk directly to program directors from the local/surrounding region (this event will have 7), and get specific advice about their application profile from programs directly as well as experienced PA students and PA-Cs. 
      PA-S  and PA-C get to fraternize and network with each other as well as tap into resources such as job recruiters, financial advisors, and transition to practice information. 
      There are always lots of giveaways such as medical equipment, PANCE/PANRE prep, discounts on scrub companies, and more. 
      This event is open to any and everyone no matter the race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, etc. 
      If you cannot attend this event, give them a follow on IG @thepa.c or FB 'Physician Assistants of Color' so you can get notified of when the next event/location will be. 


    • By sunnypits
      I'm starting at a community college. The community college  has a  general biology as a transfer Is this the same as just biology? They have chemistry too. 
    • By aa1041557
      I’ve recently been offered a position as a dialysis tech in an outpatient center. I shadowed the other day and the staff seamed friendly. My main duties would be weighing patients, cannulating them and setting up the machines, drawing labs, and monitoring their vitals throughout treatment. This all would be under the supervisions of an RN. I would work 8 and 10 hour shifts. I was hoping someone who has worked as a dialysis tech or knows someone who has could give me feedback about their experiences. I do already have 2 years experience volunteering as an EMT-A on a fairly busy service and plan on continuing to do so.  
       
      I have also been invited to interview for a medical assistant position at an urgent care, but the interview is after the deadline to decide if I’m going to accept the dialysis position. 
       
      The pros I see in working as a dialysis tech: Getting to know my patients and their cases. Experience in the chronic disease side of medicine. 
       
      Cons: It’s could be repetitive work and I would really only learn about kidney disease.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More