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Interview from a program that is on probation


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I am in a big dilemma. I did not apply to many schools this year, only 5. I recieved one rejection and got one interview invitation from a school that is under probation. This is the first time this school has been under probation, but I cannot help feeling a bit worried. But at the same time, is this my only chance this year? Should I just go with it or just try harder next year.

Can anyone offer any advise on this matter? 

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Interviewing is always good experience. 

However if you KNOW you would not attend this program if you were accepted then maybe don't waste the money to go.  If you were to be accepted to this program (and only this program) this cycle, would you attend?  Or would you forgo it and apply another year?  If you would even slightly consider attending then go to the interview.

Check the ARC-PA site and see if you can find WHY the program is on probation.  Some things are minor.  Some are huge.  

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You spent the money to apply there so go to interview unless finances work against you. If that is the case then why are you applying if you can’t afford to interview?
Next, why is program on probation? Can find this info out at ARC-PA website. If there is a laundry list, be forthright and ask about plans to get off. If they appear reasonable, then may be a risk to take. But it is a risk. PA school is stressful enough, don’t want to also worry you will find the place closed partway through your education. Good luck.


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45 minutes ago, gbrothers98 said:

You spent the money to apply there so go to interview unless finances work against you. If that is the case then why are you applying if you can’t afford to interview?
Next, why is program on probation? Can find this info out at ARC-PA website. If there is a laundry list, be forthright and ask about plans to get off. If they appear reasonable, then may be a risk to take. But it is a risk. PA school is stressful enough, don’t want to also worry you will find the place closed partway through your education. Good luck.


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I did check the ARC-PA website. So far no information on the probation as it is something that happened few weeks ago. It might be updated soon on the ARC-PA website. 

 

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I was going to mention what UGoLong said. If you start while they are on probation, you are good. Also, Arc-PA puts schools on probation for a whole host of reasons, most of which honestly do not speak to the quality of the education. One of the schools I interviewed at was on probation over a paperwork issue. I get that it is important to follow protocol, but when the school is putting out 99-100% pance pass rates each year with 100% employment, it just seems like overkill. I think that Arc-PA needs to create various types of probation to let students know what is really going on.

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21 minutes ago, UGoLong said:

If you start into a PA program on probation, you would be allowed to graduate and sit for the PANCE as schools “teach out” students who are in the program.


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Exactly.

But what happens to the applicant who has been accepted to a program on probation and then that program moves from probation to losing accreditation prior to matriculation? They are left with no options other than reapply to other schools next cycle. As you may know, programs on probation may be required to provide substantial reports and processes to ARC within 3 months of being placed on probation. Failure to do so to ARC's satisfaction could quickly result in accreditation being pulled. Not common but why be the n of 1?

George

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Exactly.
But what happens to the applicant who has been accepted to a program on probation and then that program moves from probation to losing accreditation prior to matriculation? They are left with no options other than reapply to other schools next cycle. As you may know, programs on probation may be required to provide substantial reports and processes to ARC within 3 months of being placed on probation. Failure to do so to ARC's satisfaction could quickly result in accreditation being pulled. Not common but why be the n of 1?
George

It’s certainly not optimum (to put it mildly!), but if your class has started, you can finish. You are right about being accepted but your class hadn’t started before the school lost accreditation. I have heard about applicants being out in the cold for that.


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13 minutes ago, gbrothers98 said:

Exactly.

But what happens to the applicant who has been accepted to a program on probation and then that program moves from probation to losing accreditation prior to matriculation? They are left with no options other than reapply to other schools next cycle. As you may know, programs on probation may be required to provide substantial reports and processes to ARC within 3 months of being placed on probation. Failure to do so to ARC's satisfaction could quickly result in accreditation being pulled. Not common but why be the n of 1?

George

Little devil's advocate here:  Anyone who has another option other than a probational program will likely take it (understandably so).  If the OP ONLY has this ONE option for this year, they get accepted, and your proposed situation occurs (lose accreditation prior to matriculation) and OP has to reapply next cycle, theoretically they AREN'T out any time if they had no other options this cycle anyway and would have been applying next cycle.

The caveat here to keep improving your app (working, classes, etc) if you need to so you don't lose an additional year.  That's the only downside I see.

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When you go to your interview, you should ask about the probation, it’s obviously an important aspect of the program that all applicants have a right to know about. I also wouldn’t be surprised if there is a speaker before the interviews who will mention their probation status in addition to other valuable information about the program. Definitely go and see how you feel about the school after the interview! I interviewed at a school that was on probation and they ended up giving legitimate reasons as to why it was happening, they also assured all the students at the interview that they will receive their accreditation back by backing their points up with factual evidence, so you might be pleasantly surprised too!

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