Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ollivander

Is ophthalmic tech satisfactory for PCE?

Recommended Posts

I'm still trying to get my PCE at the moment, and all I can find within my state or the bordering states are ophthalmic tech positions. All of the medical assistant positions I've reached out to want experience and/or a certification. I'm still waiting to take my NREMT to be licensed as an EMT, but there aren't any hospital positions in my area hiring at the moment (being ER tech or patient care tech positions). However, there are tons of ophthalmic tech positions that require no experience or any sort of certifications that ARE hiring. I know this isn't ideal, as it seems EMT, ER tech/patient care tech, CNA, and medical assistant experience seem to be what's pushed on here the most as valuable PCE. But I'm starting to really worry about not having enough time to fit all the PCE I need in. So do you think an ophthalmic tech position would fill the requirement I need to apply to PA schools? There are tons of scribe positions too, but I know for a fact that will not be satisfactory PCE experience to my target schools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say from my research that it's usually not accepted as PCE, unfortunately. I would be mindful of the programs you are applying to and see what they consider as PCE and what is not. I'm an EMT but because of only having a full time job availability I'm taking a CNA class so I can work in the ER on a specialized trauma/ICU unit. I know it's not what you want to hear but would rather your find out now than a year from now when you find out all of that experience didn't count.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, EMEDPA said:

ask the programs you are interested in. remember you can complete emt basic or cna in less than a month at many places...

I've already completed EMT basic over this past summer term. I just need to take the NREMT and pass it to be certified. But it doesn't look as though anyone in my area is currently hiring EMTs or ER techs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If this is the job description:

http://study.com/articles/Ophthalmology_Technologist_Job_Description_Duties_and_Salary.html

...then it sounds pretty solid to me. But definitely shoot an email to your prospective schools (or check their websites) to make sure.

Also, after typing in "ophthalmic tech pa school" on Google, several schools on the first 3 pages (Tufts, Pacific, UNC, UC Davis, UNE) showed up as accepting it as PCE. I'd take it as a good sign.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second the above. As an Ophthalmics tech, I was hands on with patients daily which is really what most places are looking for. I had no problem with any of the schools I applied to (all within NC and SC) accepting my experiences as it was definitely hands on with patients. If you’re paired with a physician who likes to teach (as I was), you have the potential to learn more than working as a CNA.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ollivander said:

I've already completed EMT basic over this past summer term. I just need to take the NREMT and pass it to be certified. But it doesn't look as though anyone in my area is currently hiring EMTs or ER techs.

Might be worth reaching out to places that might not traditionally advertise for EMTs but would take you as, say, an MA with the EMT certificate.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't need to be an EMT to get HCE.  You could apply for a job as a hemodialysis technician in your area, Divita Dialysis and Fresenius Medical Care are options.  You cannulate patients, do blood pressures, temps, weigh patients, administer Heparin and you as a technician get to decide how much fluid to pull off the patient and what is appropriate given their fluid gains.  It should be nurses that do this but that has not been my experience as a dialysis technician.  You don't need a certificate do be a tech and I felt it did more for me than my EMT.

Plus at some point or another you will have patients that crash, you will see codes, you will see strokes and will learn how you stand by being able to react appropriately to these different events.  

I say this as someone who was just accepted into PA school and the program liked my experiences.  Just a thought.

-Ket

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't see why not...I know I'll be adding this to my CASPA. I was an ophthalmic technician for a comprehensive ophthalmologist for 2 years and worked exclusively with patients all day. I was responsible for obtaining the patient's CC, HPI, ROS, medication reconciliation, checking visual acuity, checking their eye pressure, administering drops, performing at least 10 different tests/types of imaging, teaching them how to insert and remove contact lenses, taking measurements for glasses, first assisting physician during in office procedures etc.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just shadowed a PA who said he spent 9 years as an ophthalmic tech/first assist in surgery and had trouble having schools accept his PCE. He did end up getting into PA school (Nova in Florida) but apparently some schools weren't jazzed about it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took a CNA course and after passing the test I took a position as an ophthalmic tech. I have roughly 2400 hours as an ophthalmic tech and 200 as a volunteer in an ED. 5 schools have offered me interviews(maybe more on the way!). I know there are schools out there that prefer other types of care and some that will not accept ophthalmic tech for PCE, so definitely do your research. But I think it'll work out :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been working as an ophthalmic technician since I graduated. I was hesitant as well because some people advised me that schools did not accept it. However, I decided to risk it anyway since they offered me more pay than if I was a medical assistant. Last year was the first time I applied and I got 3 interviews. I reapplied this year and received 6 interview invites (and one acceptance!), so it's definitely possible working as an ophthalmic technician! Feel free to message me if you have any questions!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



  • Similar Content

    • By Jones4466
      I have recently graduated from college with my bachelors. I am not worried about my grades or GPA when applying to PA school however, I am worried about if I am doing the right Patient Care Experience or Health Care Experience. I am currently working 40 hours a week as a Physical Therapy Technician and that counts as PCE at most PA schools however, I am not interacting with the patients and learning as much. I mostly do laundry, clean up tables, and sometimes show patients exercises. I am thinking of becoming a medical scribe with Proscibe but, only working 24 to 30 hours a week. I am going to become a CNA during the fall and work part time with one job and a CNA job however, I am not sure I sure stay as a Physical Therapy Tech or become a Medical Scribe. I plan to apply to a PA program in April of 2020. 
    • By aa1041557
      I’ve recently been offered a position as a dialysis tech in an outpatient center. I shadowed the other day and the staff seamed friendly. My main duties would be weighing patients, cannulating them and setting up the machines, drawing labs, and monitoring their vitals throughout treatment. This all would be under the supervisions of an RN. I would work 8 and 10 hour shifts. I was hoping someone who has worked as a dialysis tech or knows someone who has could give me feedback about their experiences. I do already have 2 years experience volunteering as an EMT-A on a fairly busy service and plan on continuing to do so.  
       
      I have also been invited to interview for a medical assistant position at an urgent care, but the interview is after the deadline to decide if I’m going to accept the dialysis position. 
       
      The pros I see in working as a dialysis tech: Getting to know my patients and their cases. Experience in the chronic disease side of medicine. 
       
      Cons: It’s could be repetitive work and I would really only learn about kidney disease.
    • By PANCEon
      I wish at 18, I would've chosen the pre-pa route and gotten an associate's degree in DMS or an echo cardiogram tech then continued to get certified in different specialties. I may have taken pre med courses as well. Became a CNA and worked in many different specialties, hospitals, hospice, nursing and rehab facilities for experience, money, connections, letters of recommendation, on the job training to get certified in imaging, phlebotomy, resp tech, occupational or physical therapy technicians, basic EMT 1-IV, ER tech, pharmacy tech, and become a American Red Cross CNA trainer or at least CPR, AED, BLS, first aid and phlebotomy instructor's. Setting up blood drives, charity events etc. Too many ideas to count. I know now that being a healthcare professional  is my calling. Some ppl can just play the piano, which I can't, but medicine/biology/anatomy, makes perfect sense. But, I'm 40 now, and my Psychology degree I got in 2001 afforded me sales positions from food broker territory manager, pharmaceutical sales, animal diagnostic laboratory sales manager. I worked from home and travelled all over. I liked being my own boss, and other's as well. I then became a seller and writer of mortgages. Now, I have been on disability for 10yrs and am ready to do what I was meant to. I just wish I was younger. That's why it's important for me to manage my time and not waste a minute doing something that isn't going to help me get in a program. 
       
       
       
    • By PerspiringPA
      Hello all,
      I'm brand new to this forum. I graduated with a degree in biology and a gpa of 3.52, and was planning to go to medical school the whole way through, while also thinking a lot about PA school. I was ready to apply to med school while I was finishing college, but decided to take some time away from the academic environment to make sure I really wanted to do med school. After almost a year of soul-searching, researching and deliberation (in addition to the last 4 years), I have finally decided that PA is a more appropriate career path for me. I had a great mcat score (93%) and I had all of the volunteer and leadership experience to make me a competitive applicant for med school. Now that I'm looking at PA schools, I need to get my direct patient care hours, take anatomy and physiology (I didn't do the whole series since medical schools don't require it), possibly take statistics, and possibly take the GRE.
      I have 400 hours of MA experience (not certified). I know the doctor personally and worked there for 4 months, I learned a lot but it was a very disorganized clinic. I have about 200 hours working as an EMT-B. I'm wondering if I should keep working as an EMT for a year and apply for the 2021 cycle once I take anatomy and physiology at my community college. I've looked at a lot of threads on the internet and from what I've found, paramedic is the best prep for being a PA; things like, "they were a head and shoulders above the rest of their class," and "they were very  experienced with patient assessments and had great clinical presence." I've also heard that it's unnecessary and a distraction if your end goal is PA. I want to be a paramedic and get real experience doing more advanced patient assessments, but it would push PA school at least 2 years back since I'd want to work for at least a year to make it worth it. Being an EMT entails a lot of driving and sitting around the station, and when I do get patient contacts, I'm not in charge unless it's a stable (BLS) patient.
      Should I take the time to become a paramedic and get really good experience or should I get as many EMT hours as possible in a year and then apply?
      Also, do schools look at how many hours I've worked or do they need to know how much time I spent doing patient care, versus driving and sitting around the station, and how do I record that?
       
      My other main question is whether I should take the GRE or just rely on my MCAT score and not apply to "GRE required" schools. I live in CA and would like to stay in California, or at least in the west (CA, OR, WA, CO, AZ, NV, NM). This might be a question for a separate thread. 
      I know this is a lot, but it's pretty much everything on my mind right now, please feel free to only answer a portion of it if you want. 
      Thanks so much for the help!
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More