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PTO before resignation


Requesting PTO prior to Resignation  

15 members have voted

  1. 1. I do not get a pay out of accrued PTO when I leave . I have about 11 days earned & I have to give 8 weeks notice..so...

    • Request time off, get it approved and then put in 8 weeks notice?
      14
    • Dont request off..just work your last 8 weeks so you don't burn a bridge
      1


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Hi fellow PAs,

 

I need some advice. I am planning to leave my job. I have to give 8 weeks notice. I have about 11 days of PTO which I will not be getting a pay out for (private practice in NY and stated in my contract, no way around it)

My question is do I request my days off and once I get them approved, hit them with my resignation?

or 

Just work my 8 weeks and lose my time off   :-(   in effort to leave on a good note and not burn a bridge?

 

Anyone with experience with this?

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Many places won't pay you PTO or let you take PTO if you resign. I suspect if you put in for PTO and then resigned they would tell you no on the previously approved PTO. It seems you have 2 choices....1) Put in for your PTO, take it, and resign when you get back. This will likely burn the metaphorical bridge as they will feel they have been "tricked". 2) write off the PTO, resign and finish your time like a champion. Be classy and above their petty nonsense.

 

Your mileage may vary.

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1 hour ago, sas5814 said:

Many places won't pay you PTO or let you take PTO if you resign. I suspect if you put in for PTO and then resigned they would tell you no on the previously approved PTO. It seems you have 2 choices....1) Put in for your PTO, take it, and resign when you get back. This will likely burn the metaphorical bridge as they will feel they have been "tricked". 2) write off the PTO, resign and finish your time like a champion. Be classy and above their petty nonsense.

 

Your mileage may vary.

This.  Your organization likely has a policy on this.  I've worked places where they don't pay out and in theory once you put in notice you are not allowed to use your PTO and anything you have requested is revoked.  However my individual manager was allowed to override this (essentially the policy is in place in case they want to enforce it) and actually worked with me to use as much of my PTO as possible after giving notice (i.e leave if it wasn't busy, etc) bc she disagreed with the no pay out policy.

There's no right answer here as each job, situation, manager is different.  Do your due diligence on the policy and make the best decision you can.

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Our hospital pays out vacation time if you resign/quit/leave.  You lose all of your accrued sick time.

 

In my opinion that is time that you have EARNED and you are ENTITLED to it.  I think that if you are planning on resigning you should request 10 days vacation time, and resign upon returning from vacation (obviously if you can afford to give them a month or so prior to resigning it looks a lot better).

 

Maybe I am "disgruntled" after only 4 years in the field, but I don't feel I owe my employer anything.  I am very profitable for the department I work for, I see a lot of patients (often far more than the physicians) and I pay for my own licenses.  Why give back vacation time that you earned?

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UV I agree. I never leave money on the table if I can avoid it. My current employer nickle and dimes us to death and I won't give them a penny if I can avoid it. Like CME.... our accrued CME money rolls over year to year but the allotted time off doesn't. use it or lose it. I am going to use every hour somehow no matter what.

Most employers lump all your time off into PTO which they don't have to pay out f they choose not to or have a policy to that effect. Some employers still split vacation and sick time. In those cases your vacation is paid out because it has a cash value. Sick time is considered an insurance policy and it isn't paid out.

That said sometimes you have to choose between getting your money and burning a bridge. Judgement call, case by case.

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While I'm not a professional PA yet, here is my two cents.

I would inform of your resignation, then sit down and have a discussion about the PTO. See if they are willing to work with you to get those days off, or at least use some of the days. I think it would be more reasonable if you actually have something planned for why you need to use the PTO days, rather than just using them just to use them.

If they aren't willing to budge, then oh well but at least you tried to work out out instead of being sneaky about it. It is pretty obvious when someone takes a bunch of time off then resigns. Why risk burning that bridge and having that kind of reputation? Especially since you knew this going into it with your contract.

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Contract says you won't get payout, doesn't mean you won't get the days.

I would sit down with boss and say you're leaving in 8 weeks, and need to burn your PTO.  Tell them how grateful you are for everything they've done for you, how much you will miss them....and when would they like you to burn your PTO.

Bottom line...use your PTO.

If they are dicks, then be a dick back.  I can work really, really, really slow.  I can also catch a bad cold tomorrow.  And my goldfish could die or something.

 

You've got 11 days PTO.  What's that worth, $5-8K?  Would to let them steal that?

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