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Researching medical providers and potential employers


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Other than checking with a state medical board, I'm curious what others here recommend doing to check the records of physicians and other providers they will be working with. Things like disciplinary actions, malpractice claims, etc...

Also is there a way to find out all of the states a provider has practiced in other than just asking them directly? 

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2 hours ago, HanSolo said:

How do you go about finding those?

I have recently started reading reviews of companies from job sites such as Indeed, Glassdoor, etc..  Not just from the PA/NP reviewers but, employees in general.  If a front desk person, rad tech, LVN, phlebotomist has not much good to say about a company, it speaks volumes about the place in general.  It has actually steered me away from applying to numerous positions.  Taken with a grain of salt of course, because there will always be a mix of loved it/hated it reviews.  If >60% had a negative review, you can bet it's not a place I will apply to.  

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34 minutes ago, ral said:

I have recently started reading reviews of companies from job sites such as Indeed, Glassdoor, etc..  Not just from the PA/NP reviewers but, employees in general.  If a front desk person, rad tech, LVN, phlebotomist has not much good to say about a company, it speaks volumes about the place in general.  It has actually steered me away from applying to numerous positions.  Taken with a grain of salt of course, because there will always be a mix of loved it/hated it reviews.  If >60% had a negative review, you can bet it's not a place I will apply to.  

I would take the opposite approach.  Medicine is not supposed to be a customer service industry.  If an endocrinologist wanted great YELP reviews they would serve cake in the waiting room....not good medicine.

The walk through, shaking people's hands, making small talk during/after the interview IS PART of the interview where you look at the culture of the place.  Look at the cleanliness, the maintenance, the paint job (etc) for pride in the establishment.

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Going off my own question here, but you could search the employer through LinkedIn. Might be able to find current or previous PAs of that facility/clinic/etc willing to talk to you about their experience.

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27 minutes ago, Boatswain2PA said:

I would take the opposite approach.  Medicine is not supposed to be a customer service industry.  If an endocrinologist wanted great YELP reviews they would serve cake in the waiting room....not good medicine.

The walk through, shaking people's hands, making small talk during/after the interview IS PART of the interview where you look at the culture of the place.  Look at the cleanliness, the maintenance, the paint job (etc) for pride in the establishment.

Not to be confused with Yelp reviews of physicians, clinics, or hospitals by the public/consumer.  I am fully aware of those, and have signed my name to the petition to have reviews of medical practitioners removed from Yelp.

I am referring to reviews by current and former employees.  If there are ten reviews from PA or NP employees, and eight of those reviews state that the hours were longer than agreed upon during the hiring process, there is never any time for lunch or bathroom breaks, and the clinic is micromanaged by the owner's wife, that sends a clear message to me to avoid the place.  Likewise, glowing reviews with 5 stars from too many, is suspect.  There should be a mix but, if the negatives outshine the positives, I am hesitant.

Having said all of the above, I do agree with you that sometimes it takes seeing for yourself.  I have had great rapport with doctors or hospitals that many have told me to avoid.  Sometimes it boils down to compatibility.

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17 hours ago, dsta said:

Thanks, but the National Provider Database doesn't give info to the general public correct? I thought only healthcare facilities had access to that information. I could be wrong. 

That I am not sure about....I've had to "query" myself in the past for an employer. 

2 hours ago, Boatswain2PA said:

I would take the opposite approach.  Medicine is not supposed to be a customer service industry.  If an endocrinologist wanted great YELP reviews they would serve cake in the waiting room....not good medicine.

totally agree!  However, I wish I had searched yelp before going to one of my prior positions because I would have turned and walked away.  I don't agree with using Press Ganey and the whole concept behind that, but simple yelp/google reviews certainly can show how the practice is on a personal level vs their medical treatment.  A patient can get the best evidence based treatment, but still walk out feeling they didn't get treated at all because they didn't get what they wanted. 

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I also work in Washington and read this part of the newsletter. It seems that most of the disciplinary actions taken on doctors are related to narcotics and most of the actions taken against PAs are due to personal health issues (probably mental health issues) that make it unsafe for them to practice. I did see a recent disciplinary action taken against a PA for missing testicular torsion in a child. I would think there would be more to the story than just a misdiagnosis, but I guess if the outcome is bad enough from a misdiagnosis then it very well could affect your license. 

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2 hours ago, ral said:

Not to be confused with Yelp reviews of physicians, clinics, or hospitals by the public/consumer.  I am fully aware of those, and have signed my name to the petition to have reviews of medical practitioners removed from Yelp.

I am referring to reviews by current and former employees.  If there are ten reviews from PA or NP employees, and eight of those reviews state that the hours were longer than agreed upon during the hiring process, there is never any time for lunch or bathroom breaks, and the clinic is micromanaged by the owner's wife, that sends a clear message to me to avoid the place.  Likewise, glowing reviews with 5 stars from too many, is suspect.  There should be a mix but, if the negatives outshine the positives, I am hesitant.

Having said all of the above, I do agree with you that sometimes it takes seeing for yourself.  I have had great rapport with doctors or hospitals that many have told me to avoid.  Sometimes it boils down to compatibility.

Gotchya...I guess I didn't realize there were reviews like that at Indeed, etc.

 

Regarding the missed torsion resulting in a hit in your license....yikes!  Hope it was a clear-cut case.

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