NJPL1213

MBA after becoming a PA-C

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Hey guys, 

I know that this was probably discussed in the past, but I just wanted to get some new insight. Has anyone here gotten their MBA after becoming a PA-C? and if so, what are you working in now? Both administration and clinically as a PA? Hospital administration? or did you change it up and work in administration in a totally different field? Additionally was it difficult to balance working as a PA-C and getting the MBA?

I know many of my colleagues and classmates that I graduated with in PA school who have or are currently working towards their MBA. Some of them are doing it online, while others are doing it part time while working. A lot of them work full-time as a PA and take on a few administrative hours for extra income, working as a senior PA, recruiting/hiring manager, APP supervisor, and even positions on the hospital board of trustees. A couple of them ventured out and have pretty prestigious positions in big pharma administration. 

The more PAs I meet, the more I notice that many PAs have their MBA as well. Honestly I'm pretty interested in clinical work and combining it with administrative work, so I am considering entering an online or part-time program in the near future. Any thoughts?

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Honestly, MBA is probably among the least useful masters' for a pa:

* If you want to be in healthcare administration, get an MHA.

* If you want to start your own practice, take small business classes, not a business administration program.

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An MBA is kind of a general business degree. In the case of my son, he went from being a communications guy to being the business manager of a law firm. Can open doors, be a help in health care administration, or let you get out of health care completely one day.

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4 hours ago, UGoLong said:

An MBA is kind of a general business degree. In the case of my son, he went from being a communications guy to being the business manager of a law firm. Can open doors, be a help in health care administration, or let you get out of health care completely one day.

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Thats why i feel like getting an MBA is favorable over getting an MHA, at least for me. Can help me get a health care administration position, but also keep my options open for other positions not in health care. Not saying I want to leave the health care field, but id like to keep options open just in case. 

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As someone with multiple degrees in different subjects, I agree with your approach. There is no telling exactly where your career(s) and interests might take you. Good luck!


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I have an MHA, not 100% sure if I'll ever use it again. I got it prior to PA school. If I had to go back I'd prob get an MBA. There's nowhere an MHA can take you that an MBA can't - in my opinion. But plenty of places an MBA can take you that an MHA can't. But again, just one guy's opinion.


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From what I have encountered, just having an advanced degree in administration is more important than the MBA or MHA designation.

That said, for many positions, experience and who you know is more important than the degree.

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I had an MBA before going to PA school.

Maybe one day I'll put the business hat back on, figure it might be a doorway to administration/leadership in a few years, if I have the stomach for it then. But for now, I have my head down getting better at medicine.

MBA is handy to get a grasp on where money comes from, what to do with it, where it goes, and to get a handle on the risk/reward involved in those big transactions. My MBA had an operations focus, so we learned a lot about process improvement along the way (lean, Six Sigma, that sort of thing), so that comes in handy when people want to change processes, you can see through a lot of the BS and go right toward the substance of things.

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