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The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine is proud to announce the newest addition to its medical education programs. The UCSF Fresno Emergency Medicine PA Residency is accepting applications for the 2018 application cycle. This 18 month post-graduate program is designed to prepare PAs to practice in a variety of emergency medicine environments. We will be accepting 2 residents in 2018.

Deadline to apply is January 15, 2018. 

Rotations include:

  • Trauma
  • Critical Care
  • Burn
  • Orthopedics
  • Dermatology
  • Ophthalmology
  • Oral Maxillofacial Surgery
  • Toxicology
  • Radiology
  • Emergency Ultrasound
  • Anesthesia
  • EMS

Resuscitation courses include: ACLS, ATLS, BLS, PALS

18-month stipend: $90,000

Full Benefits

Paid attendance at SEMPA 360, SEMPA's annual conference

Our state-of-the-art ED at Community Regional Medical Center serves as the only Level 1 Trauma Center and Burn Center for Central California, and handles an annual ED volume of over 110,000.

For more information, please see the attached flyer.

Website: http://www.fresno.ucsf.edu/emergency-medicine-physician-assistant/

Email: em.pa.residency@fresno.ucsf.edu

Residency Flyer.pdf

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