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Post-Bacc Courses  

22 members have voted

  1. 1. Is it detrimental to complete Post-Bacc courses individually as a non-degree student without being part of a formalized certificate program?

    • Yes. Better to be part of a formalized program.
      0
    • No. Retaking courses and obtaining much improved scores individually without being part of a program is still helpful.
      13
    • No Difference.
      8
    • Either way it is good, but formalized is better.
      1


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Hello everyone, I'm new to the forum but was hoping to get your advice on my PA application plan.
 
I graduated from undergraduate in May 2015. I applied for several PA programs to begin Fall 2017, however, was not accepted. I have gathered over 1200 direct care hours, over 500 research hours, over 200 shadowing hours. I believe that the flaws were:

1) my Science GPA being below 3.0
2) applying early
3) GRE

I am currently enrolled at Hunter College as a non-degree student and I am taking post-bacc courses individual. I am ineligible for their Post-bacc certification program since their program only applies for pre-medical students. my plan is to individually re-take all the core sciences to boost my science GPA, then take the GRE's, and re-apply to PA programs early for programs beginning 2020. The only new course I would be taking is Biochemistry.

Would you think it is detrimental that this is not a degree program or that I will not receive a certificate for re-taking these courses?

Thank you again,
David

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I think the second and third options in your poll are the same, and the "correct" answer.

I completed my post-bacc courses partly on a campus with a formal post-bacc program (but not as part of that program) and partly at a community college. 

Just do well and no one will care.

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it really does not matter if you get a certificate or not. as long as you have a degree you are ok! after college i took a bunch of upper level science classes (pharmacology, pathophysiology, nutrition, genetics) at community college just to boost my GPA. i also retook A&P 1 and 2 and microbio. on my interviews last year and this year no one asked me why i did this or why i did not complete a formal program. they just want to know you can make the grades and be successful.

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