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Physician Assistants Prescribing Buprenorphine

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you really only need this cert if you will be working extensively with recovering addicts. I only know 1 PA who got this and she works part time in a drug rehab ctr for the VA. you probably don't want this liability if you are a pcp in family medicine. That's what referrals are for. Many of these folks are difficult to work with. Sure, manage their bp, dm, etc but let someone else manage their recovery, preferably someone who does a lot of this kind of work and has the resources to check spot UDS tests, etc

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wow...seems pretty risky...glad it is working with your patient population. 

it is almost impossible on the west coast to get folks into treatment in 3 days, one of the requirements of this study. most of the places in my neck of the woods have 30+ day waiting lists. 

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2 hours ago, EMEDPA said:

wow...seems pretty risky...glad it is working with your patient population. 

it is almost impossible on the west coast to get folks into treatment in 3 days, one of the requirements of this study. most of the places in my neck of the woods have 30+ day waiting lists. 

We are pretty fortunate to have some good community resources.  For almost 20 years we have had a program in our ED called Project Assert; they are a group of Health Promotion Advocates (HPA) who's only job is to screen ED patients for alcohol and drug abuse, interview them, and got those interested in detox into some form of program.  

Our ED just had another paper published this week showing the cost-effectiveness of ED suboxone.  it may not work for every department yet, but might be a tool in our toolbox someday soon.

http://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-yale-opiod-study-20170816-story.html 

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This is an interesting topic...

  The last CME event I went to someone very insightful said 'There is no Suboxone for Suboxone'.

I am glad that I am not able to prescribe it.. We have enough headaches with Benzos and Stimulants.

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