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Hi Everyone,

 

I just graduated in July and passed my boards in July.

I am really confused about the license process, I handed in the forums to the NCCPA but some of my classmates are talking about DEA and NPI number? 

What are the steps after passing boards for licensure, I sent my pass to NYS but not sure what other steps i need to be taking before starting a job.

 

thanks!

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First of all, congrats on Passing!

NPI number you can get pretty much as soon as you find out where you will be working because you will need a business address (make sure not to put your home address because that information is available with just a quick google of your name). 

You can get your DEA license only after you have received your license from the state your practicing in. If you don't wait the DEA will pretty much take your money and you won't get anything. You will also need a work address for this so it is easier to wait for those licenses until you have a job set up. 

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the answer will, to some degree, be state specific. If you graduated and passed boards you are ready to apply for a license in your state. That process will be dictated by your state board. Some require some extras like a medical jurisprudence course/test but, again, that varies.

You do not have to have an NPI or a DEA to be licensed and work but you will need an NPI to bill and probably to apply for credentialing for reimbursement with all the insurance companies. You never really have to have a DEA but if you want to prescribe scheduled drugs you will want to apply for one. That has been discussed in some recent threads here you can find by searching and noodling around on the forum.

Once you are employed get ready for the credentialing train. Employers will credential you (unless you work for some place small and private). Every different insurance company will require you to credential but, hopefully, your employer will handle that and you will just need to sign some forms they will fill out for you.

It seems daunting but you'll get the hang of it quickly.

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22 minutes ago, husky1528 said:

First of all, congrats on Passing!

NPI number you can get pretty much as soon as you find out where you will be working because you will need a business address (make sure not to put your home address because that information is available with just a quick google of your name). 

You can get your DEA license only after you have received your license from the state your practicing in. If you don't wait the DEA will pretty much take your money and you won't get anything. You will also need a work address for this so it is easier to wait for those licenses until you have a job set up. 

got it thank you!

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As stated, differs in each state.  I can't help but point out that your PA program should have gone over every detail about getting licensed in the state of your program.  My program had someone from our state chapter come in several months before we graduated and walked us through the process.  Because of this I was able to learn that I can submit application items one by one as I obtained them vs waiting for everything to be in hand before submitting.  My state required a copy of my NCCPA certificate which came a couple weeks after I passed the PANCE.  Stupid because having an NCCPA paper certificate doesn't mean one is currently certified, but this is what they wanted.  Had I waited to submit my complete application it would had delayed me a couple months.  Certainly, be sure to check with your state to see if they allow this or not.  NPI/DEA wait until after licensure to apply for them and as stated it is easiest if you have a practice address to use on the applications.

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It would handy to be licensed in the states you are applying, I always figured future employers would like not having to wait 3 months plus to get licensing.  Also, compile all of the info into one place, such as each state license numbers, your diploma, an unofficial copy of your transcript, an official copy of your transcript, copies of your bls and acls crest, your nccpa cert.  some credentialing places want those, and it's handy to send them right out rather than having to hunt for them.  Some states may need them too.  I keep hard copies in a binder, and pdfs on my computer.

 

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1 hour ago, sas5814 said:

the answer will, to some degree, be state specific. If you graduated and passed boards you are ready to apply for a license in your state. That process will be dictated by your state board. Some require some extras like a medical jurisprudence course/test but, again, that varies.

You do not have to have an NPI or a DEA to be licensed and work but you will need an NPI to bill and probably to apply for credentialing for reimbursement with all the insurance companies. You never really have to have a DEA but if you want to prescribe scheduled drugs you will want to apply for one. That has been discussed in some recent threads here you can find by searching and noodling around on the forum.

Once you are employed get ready for the credentialing train. Employers will credential you (unless you work for some place small and private). Every different insurance company will require you to credential but, hopefully, your employer will handle that and you will just need to sign some forms they will fill out for you.

It seems daunting but you'll get the hang of it quickly.

Some state pharmacy boards require DEA registration before they will give you a prescribers license, Nevada being one of them. 

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16 minutes ago, sas5814 said:

Interesting. So a prescriber's license is something separate from your state license? Learn something new every day.

Yes, in Nevada as well as Idaho I have had both a pharmacy license and medical license...and Nevada still has an MD and DO board so depending on what your supervising physician is you have to license with that board!

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2 hours ago, sas5814 said:

Interesting. So a prescriber's license is something separate from your state license? Learn something new every day.

Ohio used to have two separate, but combined them recently. 

Hawaii requires a state license, an oral code, and a narcotics (NED) registration

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