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Blowing off recruiting agencies...feel bad?


Guest ral

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In the process of applying to multiple positions, and have made contact with various recruiting agencies who supposedly service my area.  Some have been less than forthcoming with regard to the available work.  Some have crazy small print in their contracts (yes, I actually read contracts before deciding if I will sign them).  Others are quite insulting with the compensation.  Most would fall into the category of the pushy car salesman.  They ask what I am looking for, I tell them, then they barrage me with products (opportunities) that in no way reflect what I laid out for them.  Some have gotten rather offended when I turn them down.

So why do I feel a little bad when things aren't meshing?  It's not like I am leading them on.  I have a genuine interest in working, it's just that they have nothing that seems to fit.  I end up blowing them off.  I don't respond to all emails, I let my phone go to voicemail, etc.  

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Most recruiters will put you anywhere for any compensation because they want their commission. There are a few good ones and lots of bad ones and ignoring them is just fine. Tell them to stop calling and if they don't...ignore. I had one I gave my base acceptable rate to who kept sending me jobs and calling with positions for $20/hr less. I finally just told her to stop calling period.

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Don't feel bad at all. They're head hunters. I worked through a recruiter when I was considering being a chemist for Medline. I still get phone calls and e-mails to this very day from him. He's tried messaging me on Facebook, and even contacted old classmates (had to provide a list of former lab partners) wondering where I went. Other recruiters from the same company will e-mail me asking if I know of any classmates who would be interested in analytical chemist jobs that work second shift and pay $11 an hour ... eye roll. 

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Headhunters pretty much sugar coat jobs to get someone placed and make their fee. 

Come are good and some are real used car salesmen sheisters.

I hit the wrong button on a website and got 14 voice mails in ONE DAY from folks trying to put me in Bangor, Maine, Florida and all points in-between even though I checked the box marked NOT ABLE TO RELOCATE. 

Some are all sugary sweet and smoozhy - found out who the doc was on one and started laughing - she was sooooo offended. Told her that doc had a massive ding on his license, a seriously awful reputation and no one with any integrity would go to work for that practice. Pretty sure she had NO IDEA about his whole license thing. 

They are there to sell a product - not make a match. 

Ignore, delete, block - whatever - move on - no need to worry about them if you have the job you want and don't live next door to them.

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I would not feel bad in the slightest. I have had several that either never bother to respond to my calls or emails when I was looking for a new position, or will ask me to fax/email my CV, and then never bother to F/U. And these are the recruiters that reached out to me, not the other way around.

 

 I consider cold-call/email recruiters to be nothing more than telemarketers, and most deserve about the same amount of respect.

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I dont feel the least bit bad about not returning an unsolicited phone call, text, or email from a recruiter. Or anyone selling anything. They are glorified telemarketers who mine for resumes and phone numbers. Some websites will even hawk your contact info to recruiters after you've uploaded your CV!!

Block them, delete them, and if necessary tell them never to contact you ever again.

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I have never felt bad, you should not feel bad as well. They could care less about where you work or if you are happy, they just want to low ball you and collect the money. I learned my lesson with signing up for some PRN work and they never get back with you when you need them to, but will sure call you if they can make more money. I have never worked for any of them, I declined their job offers after they said $55/hr is max they will pay for a 1099! I know better than that and offered them $95/hr, which they were not happy. They quit calling for some reason...You can find jobs anywhere without a recruiter if you are willing to move. 

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agree with Rev. my last several jobs I have either been sought out specifically because of my reputation in the community or I have had to wait for someone to die or retire to get a slot. my favorite current job is a place I sent a cv to every year for a decade before even getting an interview...

I went to a few places as a new grad sent by a recruiter before finding my own job. 3 scary places. offered 3 jobs. said no to all:

1 job said my job was only to take care of a certain ethnic minority the physician didn't like in his practice...

1 was in the middle of nowhere for no pay with no backup...

1 was at a place where the doc didn't know what a pa was and really wanted a physician partner for 1/4 his pay...

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On 8/13/2017 at 11:14 AM, ral said:

In the process of applying to multiple positions, and have made contact with various recruiting agencies who supposedly service my area.  Some have been less than forthcoming with regard to the available work.  Some have crazy small print in their contracts (yes, I actually read contracts before deciding if I will sign them).  Others are quite insulting with the compensation.  Most would fall into the category of the pushy car salesman.  They ask what I am looking for, I tell them, then they barrage me with products (opportunities) that in no way reflect what I laid out for them.  Some have gotten rather offended when I turn them down.

So why do I feel a little bad when things aren't meshing?  It's not like I am leading them on.  I have a genuine interest in working, it's just that they have nothing that seems to fit.  I end up blowing them off.  I don't respond to all emails, I let my phone go to voicemail, etc.  

Use them to throw around ridiculous numbers until one of them might actually agree, such as " oh yeah i'm interested in that job, but I want all weekends off, no call, 6 weeks vacation and 180K......part time." Some may just stop calling if they know you'll ef with them, as opposed to constantly politely decline.

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8 hours ago, rev ronin said:

* Good jobs don't need recruiters; people are beating down the door to work there.

* Recruiters make their money on the difference between what the employer is willing to pay and you are willing to accept.

Enough said.

 

6 hours ago, EMEDPA said:

agree with Rev. my last several jobs I have either been sought out specifically because of my reputation in the community or I have had to wait for someone to die or retire to get a slot. my favorite current job is a place I sent a cv to every year for a decade before even getting an interview...

 

Agree with both however, I recently relocated over 300 miles from our previous home.  Was well known in that area (even with a rather large population) and was frequently sought out, whether I was looking or not.  Unfortunately, a great local reputation means very little outside of that geographic area.  Now living close to a metroplex, with zero connections to the healthcare community.  My only source for jobs at this point, is to pour over Indeed, DocCafe, LocumTenens, etc. on a daily basis, or cold call places myself.  Kind of hard to get anyone to pull your CV out of a stack, and convince them to call Dr. SoAndSo back home to vouch for you. 

Told my wife this morning, that I was strongly considering applying for non-PA jobs outside of the healthcare field.  I know I can't make even close to the same money working at Home Depot or the local industrial manufacturing place but, I was also brought up knowing the value of working for a living.  Mom was a factory worker and part time waitress, and stepfather was an OTR trucker.  I am the last person that would look down my nose at anyone for making an honest buck.

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12 hours ago, ral said:

 

Agree with both however, I recently relocated over 300 miles from our previous home.  Was well known in that area (even with a rather large population) and was frequently sought out, whether I was looking or not.  Unfortunately, a great local reputation means very little outside of that geographic area.  Now living close to a metroplex, with zero connections to the healthcare community.  My only source for jobs at this point, is to pour over Indeed, DocCafe, LocumTenens, etc. on a daily basis, or cold call places myself.  Kind of hard to get anyone to pull your CV out of a stack, and convince them to call Dr. SoAndSo back home to vouch for you. 

Told my wife this morning, that I was strongly considering applying for non-PA jobs outside of the healthcare field.  I know I can't make even close to the same money working at Home Depot or the local industrial manufacturing place but, I was also brought up knowing the value of working for a living.  Mom was a factory worker and part time waitress, and stepfather was an OTR trucker.  I am the last person that would look down my nose at anyone for making an honest buck.

Gotta be more to this story here.  Are you in a city saturated with PA and NP programs?  Why did you move to this metroplex?

There are MANY MANY MANY places that are desperate for PAs.  You may have to move again.

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option 2, take a distant position(say Alaska or indian reservation) 2 weeks on/2 weeks off. don't work at home depot. you spent a lot of time and money to become a PA....see beacon occupational health services for 2 week on/2 wqeek off and month on/month off full time jobs in AK.

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11 hours ago, Boatswain2PA said:

Gotta be more to this story here.  Are you in a city saturated with PA and NP programs?  Why did you move to this metroplex?

There are MANY MANY MANY places that are desperate for PAs.  You may have to move again.

Location: Dallas-Fort Worth

Reason:  We needed the change.  Had planned it in the back of our minds for many years, and finally worked up the sense/courage to do it.  Dallas topped our list due to location, economy, wife having family here.  She found a good job, and I figured it wouldn't be this difficult to slip into a position.  She moved a few months ahead of me, while I continued to work at my old position (they squeezed me out unscrupulously when they found out I would eventually be leaving), and I also was in the process of prepping our home for sale. We're stable, and I know something will come along.  Just taking a little longer than expected.  

Another complaint is the credentialing process.  I see absolutely no reason why the process needs to take so long.  Sixty to ninety days for someone to check that I have no malpractice claims, no long list of maimed patients, no disciplinary actions, and no other dark clouds following me around, is completely ridiculous.  That shouldn't be happening in this day of technology, and needs to change.

I would have no problem going off for work elsewhere, as EMEDPA suggests.

 

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On 8/16/2017 at 8:11 AM, ral said:

 

Agree with both however, I recently relocated over 300 miles from our previous home.  Was well known in that area (even with a rather large population) and was frequently sought out, whether I was looking or not.  Unfortunately, a great local reputation means very little outside of that geographic area.  Now living close to a metroplex, with zero connections to the healthcare community.  My only source for jobs at this point, is to pour over Indeed, DocCafe, LocumTenens, etc. on a daily basis, or cold call places myself.  Kind of hard to get anyone to pull your CV out of a stack, and convince them to call Dr. SoAndSo back home to vouch for you. 

Told my wife this morning, that I was strongly considering applying for non-PA jobs outside of the healthcare field.  I know I can't make even close to the same money working at Home Depot or the local industrial manufacturing place but, I was also brought up knowing the value of working for a living.  Mom was a factory worker and part time waitress, and stepfather was an OTR trucker.  I am the last person that would look down my nose at anyone for making an honest buck.

 When I moved back to Colorado not long after PA school it took me over 3 months to find work. I was near penniless and eventually took a job at Domino's pizza as a delivery driver. No joke. I did that for about 6 weeks just to have some cash in my pocket before I found (settled) on a PA job for $72k. 

Not sure what value that adds to your problem, but I understand not being too proud to work . It was humbling believe me. But not as humbling as asking to borrow money.

 

 

 

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Agree.  I am thankful that I am a penny pincher and saver.  Have a comfortable amount accumulated.  Would rather not burn through any savings though, when I could be working.  Told my wife that if I lose a few months pay in the interim, I will just tack that same amount of time onto the end of my career at retirement.  Instead of retiring in the month of January, I will make it April.  No big deal.

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On 8/17/2017 at 10:28 AM, Boatswain2PA said:

My understanding is Dallas is pretty over-saturated, but areas outside are desperate.  

Agree with the credentialing...but nuthin we can do about it.

Very........VERY.......over-saturated.  If anyone is planning to move to DFW I would STRONGLY advise having a job lined up, contract signed and make it through your probation period BEFORE actually moving.   With literally hundreds of new grads being dumped into DFW every year (300+), it has become a race to the bottom in regards to salary and benefits offered.  Several places I locum at now offer NO PTO,  Zero, nadda, to their full-time providers.  When I graduated PA school there was 10 jobs for every PA.  In this area now there are 10 candidates for every job.  I was told by a hiring manager for a hospital that PA's & NP's are as disposable as Medical Assistants.  Replacing them is easy because of the volume looking for jobs here.  That was depressing.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Staffing agencies saved my butt a few times!  yeah, sometimes the leave messages and emails for jobs I don't care about, but hey.  The only downside I've ever had is that a lot work it out for you to file 1099s which are a pain in the butt, and in one case, the job I worked at couldn't pay the agency fees anymore, but never had too bad of an experience...

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