Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
TPA16

Is there benefit for a PA learning OMM?

Recommended Posts

on my peds rotations, and I have a very nice MD from nigeria(now DO resident) who is offering to teach me OMM. its pretty cool

 

Was wondering if its worth knowing as a PA, particularly in an urgent care setting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

from a knowledge perspective, its great. id love to be able to connect to patients on a deeper level.  And I know that DOs can bill for it. Can PAs bill for it as well? would like to make my future employer happy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not an authority on this, but I can tell you I went to grad school with DO students and it seemed to be the consensus that none of them liked it or took it seriously. I can also tell you that (a long time ago before my medical career) as a patient, I did not like it when I was OMMed. 

Those are my two cents.  But, it never hurts to learn new skills. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not an authority on this, but I can tell you I went to grad school with DO students and it seemed to be the consensus that none of them liked it or took it seriously. I can also tell you that (a long time ago before my medical career) as a patient, I did not like it when I was OMMed. 
Those are my two cents.  But, it never hurts to learn new skills. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 


Oh man! My doc does OMM and I LOVE it. Can knock out a migraine in minutes!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, moorecarson121 said:

 


Oh man! My doc does OMM and I LOVE it. Can knock out a migraine in minutes!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

I mean, I was 19, so who knows. I just remember the guy barely resting two fingers on my neck or shoulders and expecting my neck pain to go away. (Whiplash) I'm definitely not an expert on what they can do, that's just my only experience with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely! You won't be able to bill the OMM CPT codes as a non-DO but so many of the treatments are incredibly useful and take less than 30 sec.
Have him teach you suboccipital release for headache, rib raising for any pulmonary or chest wall complaints, muscle energy for TMJ dysfunction. I use these three more than any other and sooooo easy. If you develop a knack for it your patients will love you.
I ran into a woman at my residency hospital two years after I fixed her 2+ yr chronic TMJ dysfunction with a 2-min treatment in the rural ED where I worked as a PA during med school (very very infrequently). She gave me the biggest hug and said that while she still is prone to dysfunction, the techniques I taught her to do herself can always correct it before it gets out of hand and she hasn't suffered at all in that time. THAT is the power of OMM.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What is the scientific principle here?  How is this different than chiros?


That is a much more detailed answer than I could fit here or have any desire to post at the moment...in general, somatic dysfunction exists in all of us and the skilled osteopathic physician can facilitate the body's natural self-healing abilities by finding and correcting SD.

Osteopathic medicine branched off from allopathic medicine at exactly the same time chiropractic was being formulated in the late 19th century. For a very short while, the two professions collaborated but the leaders of the two movements had VERY divergent views about the use of medicine (pharmacotherapy and surgery, namely) by the 1880s. Osteopathic physicians retained the medical model of physician training whereas chiropractic remained "pure" (we can fix everything by manipulating the spine and extremities).

Truthfully most DOs don't look or practice very differently from most MDs these days, but we all learn the techniques in med school. I look on it as an extra tool in my box and I enjoy the instant gratification of fixing something in one or two brief treatments. If I can't fix it, I will send you to PT. Many of the actual techniques are very similar between PTs, DOs and DCs but we all have our own terminology and approach.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  • Upvote 2
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you may also want to make sure that you can legally perform it...something tells me chiropractic and possibly DO boards may take issue with someone outside their "group" doing this type of work...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
on my peds rotations, and I have a very nice MD from nigeria(now DO resident) who is offering to teach me OMM. its pretty cool
 
Was wondering if its worth knowing as a PA, particularly in an urgent care setting
From my understanding a PA may perform a specialized skill IF: the physician allows it and can perform it themselves. A PA can't not perform a skill from one physician if the new physician is unable to because as the physician they must be able to supervise the skill and intervene. If you can learn a skill do it no harm! Just understand that when switching or under the supervision of a new physician you must make it clear your role and skills you may perform.
This does not however affect certificate skills such as US and such, I believe.
Personal I would soak it all up and find a physician who could do it and allow me to perform the skill as well.

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/5/2017 at 0:12 AM, MCHAD said:

you may also want to make sure that you can legally perform it...something tells me chiropractic and possibly DO boards may take issue with someone outside their "group" doing this type of work...

I am licensed as both an osteopathic and allopathic PA in Washington State.  The way the RCWs are written, I can practice anything within my training and within the scope of practice of my SP, so if trained, I would be able to provide OMM.

A quick Google shows no obvious training courses to educate me, so it's still out of scope even if the law permits it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There used to be intensive OMM courses a non-osteopath could take to gain basic understanding and practice skills which awarded a certificate at the end. I know two MDs who did this back in the 80s and used it from time to time. I do not know if they were reimbursed (this was in Oregon in late 90s/early 2000s). Reimbursement for OMM varies across state lines--although there are CPT codes and approved ICD10 codes, doesn't guarantee the insurer will reimburse. I'm in SC and I don't yet know how much I will be reimbursed for doing OMT but I am curious to find out as my supervising physician in rural Pennsylvania boosted his income 50% with OMM (he does a LOT of it and is damn good).


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to ask my DO SP if he would support me taking such a course, if I could find one.  I looked at PNWU's website, and they appeared to have offered some GME courses in OMM previously.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More