Jump to content

Recommended Posts

13 hours ago, ST@PSU said:

For clarification, application deadlines are in January and most interviews are completed by the end of February.  Please refer to our program website for details.  And while most, but not all, decisions for admission are made by March, appplicants’ plans change up until the first day of classes and people have been selected off the waitlist as late as the second day of orientation.  (I was accepted off the waitlist just 2 days before the start day).  Once interviews have concluded, however, and the class is filled, the waitlist is utilized for any openings which occur thereafter.  Hope this helps.

Best,

Sue, PA-C, Class of 2017

I apologize, I meant January! Sorry for the error. Thank you for the clarification and information! 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, for anyone whose interviewed so far:

In your experience was the interview really 7-8 hours, and was there any part that I could potentially get around to make the time shorter if I would need to leave earlier. 

Are the actual interviews before everything else?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, chelsealew said:

Hi, for anyone whose interviewed so far:

In your experience was the interview really 7-8 hours, and was there any part that I could potentially get around to make the time shorter if I would need to leave earlier. 

Are the actual interviews before everything else?

I do believe the day did take about 7-8 hours. However, the interviews were the first part of the day's events. The last event was the tour, so if you needed to leave earlier you could probably cut the tour short. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Serenityslain said:

I do believe the day did take about 7-8 hours. However, the interviews were the first part of the day's events. The last event was the tour, so if you needed to leave earlier you could probably cut the tour short. 

Thank you so much for your reply!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, chelsealew said:

Hi, for anyone whose interviewed so far:

In your experience was the interview really 7-8 hours, and was there any part that I could potentially get around to make the time shorter if I would need to leave earlier. 

Are the actual interviews before everything else?

Chelsealew - Every interview day runs a little differently depending on our class schedule. One piece that is a constant for every interview day is that all interviews are completed prior to lunchtime with our current studetns. But the afternoon varies depending on when our students have TBL - all candidates participate in TBL so the afternoon schedule will vary. If you have any specific requests for your pending interview day, please let me know and I will do everything I can to help accommodate with your travel arrangements. 

Caryn Stopper
Director of Admissions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/2/2017 at 2:07 PM, HLynne said:

Has anyone that applied earlier in the application cycling still not heard anything? I applied early July and received conformation that everything was received but have not heard back.

Hi HLynne,

I applied earlier in July as well. I am sitting waiting as well. =\

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone,

I received some questions to which I will reply here:

* First, was it hard transitioning from your career as an Clinical Exercise Physiologist to PA school?

For those who are new to the forum, I was a non-traditional graduate student having worked for 15 years (most of those as a Clinical Exercise Physiologist in several cardiac rehab centers) prior to going to PA school.  Since I got accepted only 2 days before the start of classes, I guess you could say my transition was non-existant!!  I literally gave my nurse manager less than 24 hours notices that I was leaving.  Fortunately, she was (and still is!) very supportive of me and was also one of my PA school references.  Anyway, as a non-traditional student, I did find it challenging at first adapting to how learning had changed in the 15 years since I had completed undergrad (when there was no such thing as powerpoints let alone Quizlets, YouTube, etc).  But, in PA school, you learn quickly how to either rely on the things that have always worked for you in the past or, if those no longer seem to work for the pace and rigor of PA school, you quickly learn to adapt.  If you are being accepted to PSU, you have already been identified as a bright and accomplished person who is cable of great things- so you have it in you!  With that said, as a non-traditional student with over 30,000 of health care experience prior to PA school, what did come easier for me was history taking, patient interaction, pacing and organizing the appointment, etc.  So you will have your strengths as well as areas that are more difficult for you.  PSU tries, and does an excellent job, filling its classes with students who's strengths compliment each other.  No two people in the class will be alike!  

And specifically, to the person who asked this question, don't worry about the number of healthcare experience hours you have (or don't have).  As you will see by looking at the class profiles on our program website, PSU accepts students with a full range of hours from the minimum required of 500 to 30,000 and beyond.  It's part of what makes each class diverse and unique.  There are also a wide variety of previous patient care experiences that students bring to the table so no one type (i.e. EMT, scribe, etc) is preferred over another.   

*Second, what did you find attractive about PSU's program?  Why was it your first choice?

Disclaimer: I am local to the Hershey area and, therefore, its proximity to my home where I am already well established with my family, including 2 kids, was a big reason why PSU was my first (and, for my first cycle through CASPA, only) choice.

However, I was MOST drawn to PSU because of its academic excellence, particularly the College of Medicine, and the collaboration between the COM and the Hershey Medical Center to provide the highest quality learning and clinical experiences for its medical students and residents while serving a local community that relies on, and fully supports, both institutions.  It is a really special place that I hope you get to experience for yourself!  I would, of course, agree with all of the current applicants who have interviewed and posted about all the things about the program that they like as well.  However, as I interviewed while the inaugural class was only in its didactic year, there was much less that we could know going in than all of you applying and interviewing now.  But all the great things about how personable the faculty and staff are, the innovative approaches of our director, the efficacy of Team Based Learning, the simulated patient experiences, integration with the medical school curriculum, and clinical sites with preceptors dedicated to learning- are all true and would make me choose Penn State all over again (but one time through PA school was enough for me-Haha!!).

* Third, is a GPA of 3.5 and a science GPA of 3.2 "weak"?  Did you have to work around this such as retaking classes or taking additional classes?

 So long as your GPAs meet or exceed our minimum requirements, they are competitive.  Please refer to our program's website for the maximum, minimum, and average GPAs that have been accepted for previous classes.  I, personally, cannot speak to taking classes solely for the purposes of improving my GPAs because they were already very high.  I did take additional classes the two years prior to being accepted but the classes I took were pre-reqs that I didn't have from undergrad (i.e. organic chem).  However, my GRE scores were mediocre (at best) and I did re-take those.  It turned out not to be necessary as I re-took the GRE while on the waitlist and I ended up being accepted based off of my original scores.  But had I not been accepted, I knew this the weakest area of my application and that is why I focused on improving it.  My best piece of advise would be to continually work to improve yourself as a candidate up through that moment that you are accepted.  Even if you are on a waitlist, keep working on bettering your scores, diversifying your experiences, etc.  If you take  a break, then you will just be behind the 8 ball if you have to re-apply when CASPA re-opens in April.

 

Hope this was helpful.  Continued luck to all and Happy Holidays!

-Sue, PA-C, Class of 2017

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The website deadline is given as end of January, but I am wondering if it is still worthwhile to apply. Are there still spots available in the class? Will an application still be read if it is submitted this month? Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, WonderWall said:

The website deadline is given as end of January, but I am wondering if it is still worthwhile to apply. Are there still spots available in the class? Will an application still be read if it is submitted this month? Thank you.

WonderWall-Absolutely it is still worth applying! With a Jan 15 CASPA-verified deadline and a Jan. 30 secondary application deadline, we read files through February (yes, candidates who submit their secondary application on the very last day of our cycle still have the same opportunity for an interview as someone who applied earlier in the cycle), we interview through February, and we offer acceptances through February. We honor these deadlines and seats will remain available at the close of our cycle - this ensures all applicants a fair opportunity to be invited for an interview with Penn State. I do hope this helps answer your question and we look forward to receiving your application in the near future!

Caryn Stopper
Director of Admissions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I caved and emailed them for an update?. I know I shouldn't have lol. Wish they would just send out immediate rejections(!!!) ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, LeQuack said:

I caved and emailed them for an update?. I know I shouldn't have lol. Wish they would just send out immediate rejections(!!!) ?

I know the waiting game is tough. But you will not find a more fair or thorough vetting process at any other program.  Hang in there.

- Sue

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I was offered a set on the waitlist, and was asked to e-mail the program with a decision on whether or not I wanted to be placed on the waitlist. I e-mailed the program, but have no heard back since. Is this normal, or was I supposed to receive a verification e-mail?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, GoFlacco said:

So I was offered a set on the waitlist, and was asked to e-mail the program with a decision on whether or not I wanted to be placed on the waitlist. I e-mailed the program, but have no heard back since. Is this normal, or was I supposed to receive a verification e-mail?

GoFlacco-my apologies that your email did not receive a confirmation from me in a timely manner. I do try to reply personally to all waitlisted candidates but it has been quite a busy cycle, and if you've interviewed with us then you know how small our operation is for the number of applicants we have.
Please email me again at your convenience and I will confirm your active status on the waitlist. 

Caryn Stopper
Director of Admissions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

 

I am considering submitting for this cycle, but I am wondering how many interview dates are left since the deadline is January 15th.  I am a non-traditional applicant working in medical research and I couldn't be more excited to be applying to Penn State. 

 

Thank you for your time,

Sarah 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SGPDX84 said:

Hello,

 

I am considering submitting for this cycle, but I am wondering how many interview dates are left since the deadline is January 15th.  I am a non-traditional applicant working in medical research and I couldn't be more excited to be applying to Penn State. 

 

Thank you for your time,

Sarah 

Hi Sarah,

I can not answer your question specifically but typical interview cycles for PSU have approximately 2 interview sessions per month and interviews typically run through February so that those that completed the application process, even on the deadline date, have an opportunity to interview.  So by all means, apply!!  And, from one non-traditional student to another, GOOD LUCK!

Happy Holidays!

- Sue, PA-C, Class of 2017

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, mpeach said:

Have all interview invitations for February been sent already?

Only Caryn Stopper can answer that; however, since we are not passed the deadline, I would guess probably not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, mpeach said:

Have all interview invitations for February been sent already?

mpeach - We do not fill our class prior to our January 30th secondary application deadline, therefore yes, we are still interviewing and yes, there are still ample interview seats available for our February interview dates. Best wishes-

Caryn Stopper
Director of Admissions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

So as this application cycle is coming to a close, I was wondering what are ways to improve your application for next years cycle? I am currently working in the medical field as a phlebotomy tech and have official finished all of the prerequisites as of December. I looked into Medical Assistant but that would ultimately be costing more money for something I do not see myself spending the rest of my life doing. I am open to any suggestions anyone may have. Thanks!

-Miranda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mlgeyer24 said:

Hi,

So as this application cycle is coming to a close, I was wondering what are ways to improve your application for next years cycle? I am currently working in the medical field as a phlebotomy tech and have official finished all of the prerequisites as of December. I looked into Medical Assistant but that would ultimately be costing more money for something I do not see myself spending the rest of my life doing. I am open to any suggestions anyone may have. Thanks!

-Miranda

Hi Miranda,

Look beyond your health care experience hours.  Quite possibly, that may be one of your strengths.  I would recommend starting by comparing what you bring to the table to the class profiles listed on our program’s website.  If there are areas where you fall below the “average”, I would focus on those first.  For me, it was my GRE scores.  Then, if you have not spent a lot of time shadowing PAs, I would suggest doing that.  Not only is it something you can include in your application, but it likely will give you many more insights about the profession that you can use to enhance your essay, create more professional contacts, or earn a stronger personal reference.  Also, if you do not already have a graduate degree, you might consider taking some related graduate level courses which, if you do well, will both show you are up to and committed to the challenge of PA school and also boost your GPA (if this is an area for improvement for you). Additionally, don’t overlook community service opportunities.  While I was working full-time and completing pre-reqs, I volunteered on my days off at a free clinic.  I was able to combine shadowing providers, seeing real patients, and helping the people in my own community all at the same time.  As you get out there, you can ask other practicing PAs what they did and figure out what is best for you.  Good Luck!!

- Sue, PA-C, PSU Class of 2017

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ST@PSU

Thank you for your quick reply. I will compare my current application to the previous class profiles as well as the one for this coming year when posted and use that to determine what I need to improve for next year. Again thank you for your advise, I will definitely look into shadowing more PA's and volunteering for community service opportunities in my area.

Miranda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, mlgeyer24 said:

@ST@PSU

Thank you for your quick reply. I will compare my current application to the previous class profiles as well as the one for this coming year when posted and use that to determine what I need to improve for next year. Again thank you for your advise, I will definitely look into shadowing more PA's and volunteering for community service opportunities in my area.

Miranda

You are welcome!  Also, I meant to mention in my original post, don’t neglect any of your talents- even if they do not seem related!  They are what make you, YOU, and can not be separated from the PA you will become!  For example, among my classmates, there is a triathlete, photographer, writer, musician, philosopher, and bear hunter (just to name a few).  Myself, I was a figure skater and coach before having kids and pursuing graduate school.  I also completed half of a masters in health administration before realizing it wasn’t for me. Anyway, the takeaway message is this: in addition to all the usual “stuff” you want to have shine in your application, make sure to also highlight what makes you unique.  It will make you memorable and may demonstrate characteristics that are invaluable as a PA (people skills, quick thinking, attention to detail, creativity, etc, etc) that you have not yet been able to show in any other way.  Again, hope this helps and, of course, best of luck!!

- Sue

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, mlgeyer24 said:

@ST@PSU

Thank you for your quick reply. I will compare my current application to the previous class profiles as well as the one for this coming year when posted and use that to determine what I need to improve for next year. Again thank you for your advise, I will definitely look into shadowing more PA's and volunteering for community service opportunities in my area.

Miranda

Oh, and one more thing, NEVER stop working on improving yourself until that moment you have an acceptance.  Actually, never stop working to improve yourself EVER!  This process moves so quickly, and none of us really know what PA school admissions committees are looking for, that even if you are applying and interviewing keep working on YOU.  It’s almost February already which means only 2 short months until CASPA re-opens.  Ideally, you will have been working to improve your application all along.  And as a practicing PA, you MUST be continually learning and improving- your patients are relying on you!!

Good Luck to all!

- Sue

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/27/2018 at 1:29 PM, ST@PSU said:

Oh, and one more thing, NEVER stop working on improving yourself until that moment you have an acceptance.  Actually, never stop working to improve yourself EVER!  This process moves so quickly, and none of us really know what PA school admissions committees are looking for, that even if you are applying and interviewing keep working on YOU.  It’s almost February already which means only 2 short months until CASPA re-opens.  Ideally, you will have been working to improve your application all along.  And as a practicing PA, you MUST be continually learning and improving- your patients are relying on you!!

Good Luck to all!

- Sue

Thank you for all of the advice! It definitely gives me things to think about as it gets closer to CASPA opening again. I will keep everything you said in mind. Thank you again for everything!

Miranda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone e-mailed to inquire on their position of the waitlist? Or anyone know if the waitlist is more fluid and not really consisting of ranked applicants? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Similar Content

    • By taecson
      I don't really comfortable speaking this frankly to my colleagues. None of my close friends or family are in the medical field so they don't truly understand.  I am still a somewhat new PA and I am already considering a new career path. I went to PA school 2 years after graduating college, so I don't have any experience in any other fields besides healthcare. But I've been having serious thoughts about quitting my job and quitting the medical field altogether. A little background about me, I am in my late 20s and I have been a practicing PA for about 4 years. During this time I have been at the same practice, a specialty and internal medicine office. There are several physicians, but I am employed by one. I see patients in the clinic, in several acute care hospitals, and at nursing homes. Although I like the variety and the types of patients I see are very interesting to me, there are downsides to the job that just become more apparent every day. I work M-F 9-5 and 2 weekends per month. I have to take round at the hospitals and take calls on those 2 weekends, plus take calls 3 weekdays out of the week. I often work 3 weekends a month, and occasionally even 4 when my contract technically says 2. 
      My supervising physician is retirement age and he refuses to retire and instead delegates more and more tasks to me. For example, sometimes if he is too tired / lazy he will tell the staff to just transfer patient appointments to my schedule. Patients are understandably upset when they made an appointment with the doctor they've known for years and get switched to the schedule of a PA they don't know. I feel like "as the PA", and an employee of the doctor, I pretty much get saddled with all the grunt work and undesirable tasks that he doesn't want to do. I know in other settings PAs are treated with a little more respect and not just given the busy work to do. There are some upsides, I do like my SP, we work well together, and I feel like I can honestly and freely discuss patients with him without judgment. I also know that he may retire in a few years so this job won't be permanent either. I don't know if getting a new job will help.
      I applied for two separate jobs that I did not get. One was a family practice M-F with no call/weekends and the other was an allergy practice M-F with no call/weekends. Getting rejected for both of those jobs really discouraged me and made me feel trapped at this job. It won't be easy to find a new position.
      I get frustrated with patients too. It just feels like there are so many patients who are med seeking. Some providers in my area were recently sentenced to prison time for overprescribing narcotics. They were reckless with their prescribing and I am quite careful, but the fact that jail time is in the realm of possibility for our profession constantly looms over my head. 
      Patients also often want to be on disability when they clearly do not need to. There are so many patients wanting DMV disability placards and getting irate when I tell them they don't qualify. In addition, patients whose licenses get revoked want me to sign off on them being safe to drive when there was a clear reason the licenses were revoked. Again, I am on the receiving end of the brunt of their frustration and anger when I say they need a specialist clearance. There is just so much liability in our career field and so much stress involved. Liability is always there medically too. YOUR decision can affect whether a patient LIVES or DIES and it's so much stress that I have actually developed my own health issues secondary to the stress. 
      I have had a patient stalk me and become obsessed with me. He wrote me unhinged letters and made many calls to the office describing my car, etc. We had to get the police involved and I considered filing a legal restraining order. I know this is possible in any profession, but it feels like healthcare can be personal and intimate and patients can get the wrong idea. I again contemplated quitting the profession at this time.
      I have looked into other careers such as being a pharmaceutical representative, working in research, being an accountant, ANYTHING other than this. I have contemplated quitting and just living off my savings until I figure it out. I have talked to some colleagues to an extent, many are much older and have been PAs longer than me. I sometimes question if I'm just being an entitled millennial who wants life-work balance early on in their career until I realize that it's not normal or common to work 24-25 days in a row. It's not normal to only get 4 days off a month (if that. Some days I would get 2 days off a month.) I actually finally told my SP I was considering leaving because I was too burnt out. He trivialized my concerns and said "Why are you burnt out? You're young. I have been doing this for 40 years." Which is true, but this wasn't the life I envisioned for myself. After talking, he did acknowledge my concerns, and he hired an NP who can help me with the workload and guaranteed that I will only have to work the 2 weekends a month as outlined in my contract and I did get a raise. (I still feel like I'm underpaid which is a whole separate story.)
      Sorry for the essay, I just really needed somewhere to air out my frustrations with other people in my career field. Thanks in advance for reading.
    • By Lifeline10
      New program pending accreditation. Good luck to all the prospects that are applying!
    • By aksidoti
      Hi everyone! I knew that Duke's supplemental application would be a beast, but I was just curious if anyone had experience with the patient care and shadowing tabs? Here is what I am struggling with: 
      - PATIENT CARE: can the description be the same as on my CASPA? And what exactly should I be putting for the agreeable and disagreeable aspects of my responsibilities? 
      - Shadowing: can I put the same descriptions as my CASPA? 
      Thanks guys! Best of luck to everyone!
    • By Habb31719
      I wanted to know if anyone could add any input on this; 
      I had requested a PA for a letter of evaluation. He was happy to agree to give one. I also had sent him a copy of my resume just because I thought that was the appropriate thing to do. 
      last week at work him had mentioned two things... he had brought it up to me that I didn't have my GPA posted on my resume and asked if if I was planning to put it on my resume. he also started asking me things like "do you want me to just not address GPA at all then?". So, for the copy of the resume I had sent to her, I didn't put my GPA in because I didn't think it was going to be helpful (my undergrad is a 3.35 which is not competitive) The whole purpose of sending him a 1 page resume was so that he could know a little more of what I have done in undergrad; like, have a little more amount of information of who I am outside of scribing. (I've been a scribe for about 9 months; about 5 of those months have been heavily involved with this particular PA, so although we haven't had many conversations personally its not like I am a stranger to him 
      The other thing that he requested is if I had personal statement finished. I will sincerely admit, I am quite behind on the application process as my personal statement still has work to do; I told him it's still being written. He asked if she should have a summary of it or something like that so he has more details to flesh out his evaluation letter. 
      I told her I would email her about the GPA issue and the personal statement summary because he was asking out loud in front of the other doctors and employees in the nurses station and I was a little shy to answer. I don't know why, but I wasn't expecting him to ask those questions.
      So here is what I was asking: 
      1. Should I have 3.35 on my resume at all? (I was a public health major)
      2. Is giving a personal statement/summary super necessary for you LOR evaluators? Because I really have alot more to do on my PS so I'm not sure how I can make a good summary in a short amount of time to give him; as well as the other evaluators.
    • By aking129
      I am feeling unsure as to whether or not I will get into PA school. I have a bachelor's degree in Public Health Science. My cumulative gpa is a 3.92 and my science gpa is a 3.8 with 61 science course credits. I have 1,000 hours of patient contact currently from working as a physical therapy aide during undergrad. I am taking a gap year and working 36 hours per week as a medical assistant and also taking weekend shifts as a physical therapy aid to reach approximately 3,000 hours when I apply next year. I also have about 200 hours of other related experience through working as a medical receptionist and volunteering and have 100 hours from shadowing. I have about 500 hours of volunteer experience from a service trip for income equity, a social justice student group, volunteering with a group that works to fix low-income health disparities, an LGBTQ+ community health clinic, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and the philanthropy committee for my sorority. I am doing research with a nearby medical school and will have about 300 hours of research experience at the time I apply (this is a volunteer position). I was a teaching assistant for anatomy and physiology II for two years. I served as the president of a student organization and the vice president of the same organization, a program lead for a social justice organization, and I was the chair of philanthropy for my sorority. Other extracurricular involvements included Students Engaged in Public Health,  Sigma Kappa Sorority, Maryland Public Interest Research Group, Maryland Leadership Education and Development, and Ballet Company M. I am mostly concerned that I have not taken enough science credits and do not have enough patient contact. Are there other things I should work on to strengthen my profile? Should I take more science classes? Should I consider a master's in a science field? I studied public health because I am truly passionate about approaching patient care from this perspective and want to work in health administration health policy in addition to patient care, and I plan to explain this in my personal statement.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More