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8 minutes ago, KRushin said:

Not quite sure what you mean? They take into account everything when the faculty decide who to accept. The interview just helps to get to know people, and figure out peoples strengths, weaknesses, how they got to where they are today.

I mean once you get an interview is an acceptance based on your gpa, etc + interview performance or only how you did on the interview ?  

 

Some schools use the interview to see if they want to accept you because they liked your stats already while others use a combine score of interview + gpa and gre to decide 

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I saw this posted on another sub-forum and thought it was a great idea! So, I thought I'd throw this out there to since it seems to be really helpful for perspective students, people interviewing, or

I'll give an example based on this week, as its a decent gauge for the spring semester. Just a quick note, in general, they say spring is a little "easier" than Fall and Summer. I'm an early bird when

Genetics are interspersed throughout Pathophysiology. Physiology is part of Pathophysiology. You should already have exposure to medical terminology before entering PA school (many, if not m

23 minutes ago, ilygurlie said:

I mean once you get an interview is an acceptance based on your gpa, etc + interview performance or only how you did on the interview ?

Can't speak to exactly what the faculty discuss (cause haven't sat in during their admission meetings) but one of our professors told me they use interviews to explain someones application, not only to the staff you interview with but to explain to other staff when deciding on admissions. I.E. If a candidate bombed undergrad, and had a 2.8 GPA, but then went on to grad school, got a masters, and had a GPA50 of 3.9 in all hard sciences and graduate classes. Then they really like them despite them having an overall GPA of 3.1. Then they take that into heavy consideration and think they are very competent academically and the overall GPA isn't a good representation of that candidate, then they discuss other parts (experience, personality, etc...). So all of those are usually discussed. 

So i guess in short, yes, they still factor the other things into consideration and its not only about interview performance only.

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On 10/17/2017 at 10:29 AM, ncml20 said:

Hello! 

This thread has been very helpful. I was wondering if you could speak about how rotation sites are determined? Where are the location of typical rotation sites and do they offer placement in other locations throughout the state of NC? Thanks!

All rotations are placed for you, so no worries about finding any (unless you want a specific site). You can rotate with doctors you know back home (including out of state), they just have to fill out some paperwork.

Right now all rotations are local to Charlotte, however there is almost a guarantee you will have 1 rotation away from Charlotte. So for example mine is next semester in Ahoskie, NC (4.5 hours away). So from others i have talked to this is amazing. In my home state, Texas, most programs would send you all over the state regularly. But for Wingate they can easily get 9 out of 10 in the Charlotte area, which is nice :).

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Hi, thanks for making this post. :) I have an interview at Wingate next month. I have been to Charlotte NC many time and was wondering if you can describe what its like to live in Wingate? Also was wondering how is the curriculum structured? Do you guys go from system to system throughout the first year? Random question but I was curious if there is any opportunity for international rotations/ are there international volunteering opportunities that wingate participates in? I'm really interested in traveling.

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On 10/28/2017 at 9:46 AM, 2018 cycle applicant said:

Hi, thanks for making this post. :) I have an interview at Wingate next month. I have been to Charlotte NC many time and was wondering if you can describe what its like to live in Wingate? Also was wondering how is the curriculum structured? Do you guys go from system to system throughout the first year? Random question but I was curious if there is any opportunity for international rotations/ are there international volunteering opportunities that wingate participates in? I'm really interested in traveling.

Sorry for the delay. As of now it is a systenm based approach (or as close as possible). When you are going of Cardiology in Clinical medicine, you are going over Cardiac drugs in pharmacy and cardiopulmonary in pathophysiology. Some sections aren't like that, but they try to have as much crossover as possible.

I have not heard about international rotations, and if its even allowed in general? But NC is part of the SARA so you can do rotations outside of NC in 48(last i checked) out of the 50 states! Infact i'm going back to Texas for a rotation! Wingate does have a medical mission trip they usually do in the summer where they go to Haiti. I haven't been yet, but i'm hoping ill be able too! Thats an ambitious thing to do, i would say, in general, don't focus on traveling while in school. Spend the 2-3 years, do medical missions trips as they come up. Trust me, you will want to stay relatively planted during these 2-3 years. After you are finished then do all the traveling you want :)

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6 hours ago, KRushin said:

Sorry for the delay. As of now it is a systenm based approach (or as close as possible). When you are going of Cardiology in Clinical medicine, you are going over Cardiac drugs in pharmacy and cardiopulmonary in pathophysiology. Some sections aren't like that, but they try to have as much crossover as possible.

I have not heard about international rotations, and if its even allowed in general? But NC is part of the SARA so you can do rotations outside of NC in 48(last i checked) out of the 50 states! Infact i'm going back to Texas for a rotation! Wingate does have a medical mission trip they usually do in the summer where they go to Haiti. I haven't been yet, but i'm hoping ill be able too! Thats an ambitious thing to do, i would say, in general, don't focus on traveling while in school. Spend the 2-3 years, do medical missions trips as they come up. Trust me, you will want to stay relatively planted during these 2-3 years. After you are finished then do all the traveling you want :)

Hi thanks so much for doing this! I was wondering if you have any info on the percentage of graduates who find jobs within 3-6 months? Are you concerned about the number of graduates in NC?

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On 11/19/2017 at 10:43 PM, ilygurlie said:

Hi thanks so much for doing this! I was wondering if you have any info on the percentage of graduates who find jobs within 3-6 months? Are you concerned about the number of graduates in NC?

I don't have any numbers so I couldnt help you there. But i know its a very high percentage, and a good amount have interviews before graduating with offers before they walk across the stage. To be honest, no. The more and more I keep doing rotations in the area the more i see various places wanting providers. Our program has a good reputation so finding a job isn't that hard (aslong as you aren't trying for a super specific job right out of PA school).

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6 hours ago, KRushin said:

I don't have any numbers so I couldnt help you there. But i know its a very high percentage, and a good amount have interviews before graduating with offers before they walk across the stage. To be honest, no. The more and more I keep doing rotations in the area the more i see various places wanting providers. Our program has a good reputation so finding a job isn't that hard (aslong as you aren't trying for a super specific job right out of PA school).

Thanks so much for answering. I really loved seeing this program but was concerned about the saturation in the area. Thanks for easing my worries!

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On 11/26/2017 at 10:51 AM, 2018 cycle applicant said:

Do you guys learn on real cadavers/ could you describe the simulators if you use those? Just a general idea of how the learning is laid out? Thanks for the feedback.

System based approach (Clinical med: Pulmonary disease, Pharmacy: pulmonary drugs, Pathophysiology: Pulmonary, Patient assesment: Cardio/pulmonary ).

No cadavers, just anatomy lab with models, and electronic models/simulations. I have used cadavers in the past, and while they are nice to have, personally, I don't think they are a deal breaker. But the awesome thing is we have agreement with one of the local medical examiners and on Fridays if there are any autopsy you have an opportunity to go see autopsies that day!

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On December 16, 2017 at 7:34 AM, noodlesbroski said:

I also am questioning what apartments would be best to live at near wingate or do you guys commute very far.

Do you plan on commuting or plan on living right next to the school? I heard most people commute about 30-45 minutes from the Matthews or Charlotte area. 

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I have lived in Matthews my entire time (I have loved it). I don't mind the 35-45 minute commute, but if you hate commuting/driving then you may want to live closer. My diadactic year, I'd say 1/2 of the class lived in Wingate, or Monroe (~15 minutes) but almost everyone moves to closer to charlotte once they are on rotations.

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15 hours ago, marinaciarmella said:

I just got an interview for Wingate! I have a few random questions..

What hospitals do Wingate students (main campus) typically do their rotations at?

What are you choices for the two elective rotations?

What do you think makes Wingate`s program unique?

 

1. Between all the specialties (ER, internal medicine, and electives) our school utilizes them all (so all of the Atrium (CHS) and Novant hospitals). However, the main Level 1 and then Level 2 hospital near central Charlotte (CHS main / Presby main) typically PA students only do Internal medicine and electives there. CHS Main ED (level 1 trauma center) typically is full with Medical students so PA students usually aren't in the ER there. They typically match you with the hospital closest to where you live in Charlotte.  I live in Matthews (southwest Charlotte) so I was at the hospitals in South and west side.

Hospitals I am (was) at:

Inpatient Internal Medicine: CHS Union
Orthopedic Surgery ( CHS Union, and Novant Presby main/Matthews)
General Surgery: Piedmont Medical Center 
Emergency Medicine: CHS Stanley

So all of the hospitals I was at were in south or west of Charlotte

2. Pretty much every specialty and most subspecialties?. I have a list of various specialities people have done that our program has done (if you want me to message it to you). I did Sports medicine, and Orthopedic Surgery. This is one strength of our program, we have lots of connections with Charlotte area.

3. Hmmm that's hard, haha. It's hard to say cause I have only been apart of one program ^_^.  But I would say the two greatest strengths (maybe not unique), the quality ( and location) of rotations is top notch. No worrying about living out of a hotel during your clinical rotations is nice. The next would be how well the school/faculty prepare you for rotations/boards. They push you to be the best PA possible and it shows. Last 3 classes have had 100% first-time PANCE pass rate. In the last two years at AAPA National conference, our program has beat most of the NC PA schools in the Challenge bowl (including Duke ^_^). So i feel they are doing something right, and i feel confident in how they have prepared me, and not worried when it comes to the PANCE ?.

Hope this helps, and I'll try to think of something I know is unique ^_^ and post it.

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@KRushin thank you so much for answering!!

 

I was so happy when you said Atrium!!! The surrounding hospitals were one of the top reasons I was interested in Wingate. The endless specialties and reputation is definitely a giant plus to the program especially since I'm interested in specialties like surgical critical care, interventional cards, maternal fetal, etc.

How do you like living in/around Charlotte? One of the main reasons I didn't apply to schools from my home state was because the surrounding town was not a place I would simply enjoy in my life outside of school.

 

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Hi!

I have a few questions about Wingate- main campus. 

I was wondering how much preference and flexibility that the students get with clinicals? 

Do you feel that not having a cadaver lab is a big disadvantage? 

I heard the professors sometimes teach at the Hendersonville campus, does this hinder your learning any? 

 

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On 10/3/2018 at 10:54 AM, Fsl247 said:

Hi!

I have a few questions about Wingate- main campus. 

I was wondering how much preference and flexibility that the students get with clinicals? 

Do you feel that not having a cadaver lab is a big disadvantage? 

I heard the professors sometimes teach at the Hendersonville campus, does this hinder your learning any? 

 

1. As of now, there are 10 total rotations, 5 weeks each.
1 of each: General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Inpatient Internal medicine (hospitalist), Women's health, Psychiatry, Pediatrics
2 of either:  Family medicine, Urgent care, outpatient  internal medicine
2 electives - There are tons to pick from. We have quite a bit of connections in Charlotte area.

2. Personally, I don't think it is. Plus we have the option to go to a local medical examiner, who is pretty awesome, and see autopsies (if they have any on Fridays). While not quite the same as cadaver lab, you get to see quite a bit of the important stuff.

3. ~90% of the time, classes are taught at the main campus. So they taught so infrequently up there,  I really didn't notice any difference. If you don't have good self-discipline (browsing facebook, or what not) then it may hinder your learning, but you could do that with the professor in front of you on the main campus.

 

 

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I noticed that Wingate's program does not include some courses that other programs do such as: clinical behavioral medicine, health promotion, legal issues in healthcare, physiology, medical terminology, life support procedures, and clinical genetics. Do students feel prepared and confident to work as PAs without classes such as these? Do you feel like you are lacking knowledge in any areas because they were not included in the curriculum? Do you learn any topics relating to these courses within your other classes? I want to make sure I choose a program with curriculum that will make well prepared and well rounded. 

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On 1/24/2020 at 10:42 AM, ascience19 said:

I noticed that Wingate's program does not include some courses that other programs do such as: clinical behavioral medicine, health promotion, legal issues in healthcare, physiology, medical terminology, life support procedures, and clinical genetics. Do students feel prepared and confident to work as PAs without classes such as these? Do you feel like you are lacking knowledge in any areas because they were not included in the curriculum? Do you learn any topics relating to these courses within your other classes? I want to make sure I choose a program with curriculum that will make well prepared and well rounded. 

Genetics are interspersed throughout Pathophysiology.

Physiology is part of Pathophysiology.

You should already have exposure to medical terminology before entering PA school (many, if not most programs have this as a pre-req).

"Life Support Procedures" sounds like something focused towards critical care medicine. We get procedural training in the summer, but you shouldn't enter PA school thinking you'll be the one placing ETT's regularly or managing a vent. My initial guess is that this is an offering intended to draw in applicants.

Schools have varying terms for how they define the medicine portion of the curriculum. Some schools use clinical medicine, others use behavioral medicine, community medicine, etc. If you're truly concerned about it, you should contact those schools and ask them what they mean by "behavioral medicine."

Health promotion is mixed in with Clinical Medicine. However, be aware that the allopathic model (what PA school is designed upon) primarily focuses on disease treatment first.

Legal issues are probably covered through the Health Care Issues course.

TL;DR = Schools may tweak their offerings to appear different from other schools. If a school has continuing accreditation, it's meeting required benchmarks for their cohorts to pass the PANCE. This is what matters most.

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Hello I will be attending Wingate in August and was wondering if someone could help me with 2 questions I had.

Is the first year orientation on the main campus for both campuses? I am enrolled for the Hendersonville campus and wondering if we will have one on our campus instead.

Also, I will be staying in Greenvile (South Carolina) rather than living in Hendersonville. In my interview they kept telling me I could live in Greenville and commute and then do my clincal hours there. Do they have connections to place me in Greenville hospitals or would I need to find my own doctors here to be placed with?

Not sure if anyone knows the answers to these but just thought I should ask just incase!

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On 3/19/2017 at 2:26 PM, KRushin said:

I saw this posted on another sub-forum and thought it was a great idea! So, I thought I'd throw this out there to since it seems to be really helpful for perspective students, people interviewing, or people who are accepted and about to start! 

 

First of all I'd like to welcome all of you here, my name is Kevin and I am currently on the clinical portion of Wingate PA program (edited 10/20)! I would like to use this thread as place to answer any questions about the school, program, area and all things student life. Feel free to reach out and let me know if you have any questions. I or some of my classmates would be happy to get back to you!

 

Good luck and congratulations to everyone looking to become a PA!

Hi @KRushin ! I would love to know about your personal statement. I am currently trying to write mine and Im unsure if the topic is strong enough. It is a very rough draft at this time. I will be applying May 2020.

I have a meeting set up with Susan L this month. Anything I should specifically ask her? I have already been to an open house. 

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