Jump to content

why do some people go through medical school or get their MBA after PA school?


Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

This is probably the wrong place to post this thread but I ran into a PA who is now in med school.

Talking with her, she sounded like she loved working as a PA (emergency) so I asked why get an MD...

I did not get a satisfying answer. I can understand if someone actually wants to do surgery or maybe open up their own practice (?) but why else might PAs want to get their MD?

 

I also heard from a friend of mine that she knows a PA who is working on getting his MBA. Would this possibly because he might want to be a hospital admin someday? What could be the reason?

 

I was just curious and just want to hear opinions on this. Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

This is probably the wrong place to post this thread but I ran into a PA who is now in med school.

Talking with her, she sounded like she loved working as a PA (emergency) so I asked why get an MD...

I did not get a satisfying answer. I can understand if someone actually wants to do surgery or maybe open up their own practice (?) but why else might PAs want to get their MD?

 

I also heard from a friend of mine that she knows a PA who is working on getting his MBA. Would this possibly because he might want to be a hospital admin someday? What could be the reason?

 

I was just curious and just want to hear opinions on this. Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep all that and some PAs may just get fed up with being stuck in the "middle" of the totem pole. Some people just have that personality that they always have to be working on something "greater" and bigger. Maybe for the challenge. Maybe for the money. WTC gave good answers.

 

MBA - yes sounds like they either love school, want a plan B, or possibly learned they don't like working with patients as much as they expected.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep all that and some PAs may just get fed up with being stuck in the "middle" of the totem pole. Some people just have that personality that they always have to be working on something "greater" and bigger. Maybe for the challenge. Maybe for the money. WTC gave good answers.

 

MBA - yes sounds like they either love school, want a plan B, or possibly learned they don't like working with patients as much as they expected.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That Doc...was she at OHSU? I met (and fell in love with, but we'r both married..tragic story really...but I digress) anyways...she said she decided to go back to Med School to really learn all the stuff that PAs are expected to know. She felt the pace of PA school was too fast and she wanted to more of the finer details.

 

some people just have an insatiable thirst for knowledge.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That Doc...was she at OHSU? I met (and fell in love with, but we'r both married..tragic story really...but I digress) anyways...she said she decided to go back to Med School to really learn all the stuff that PAs are expected to know. She felt the pace of PA school was too fast and she wanted to more of the finer details.

 

some people just have an insatiable thirst for knowledge.

Link to post
Share on other sites
That Doc...was she at OHSU? I met (and fell in love with, but we'r both married..tragic story really...but I digress) anyways...she said she decided to go back to Med School to really learn all the stuff that PAs are expected to know. She felt the pace of PA school was too fast and she wanted to more of the finer details.

 

some people just have an insatiable thirst for knowledge.

 

I have never been scared by a forums's words but her answer to your question made my hair on my neck stand up.

 

Now, not saying a PA can replace a doctor in regards to the "finer" details, but usually and correct me if I wrong, a PA get into something they have an affinity for and should excel at "I hope". May be she went to one of those schools that don't require HCE?

 

I really hope this is not the case when I go to PA school, I definantly wanna learn on what to do in any situation given and not feel I have to do 2 more years of med school and a residency to achieave this.

Link to post
Share on other sites
That Doc...was she at OHSU? I met (and fell in love with, but we'r both married..tragic story really...but I digress) anyways...she said she decided to go back to Med School to really learn all the stuff that PAs are expected to know. She felt the pace of PA school was too fast and she wanted to more of the finer details.

 

some people just have an insatiable thirst for knowledge.

 

I have never been scared by a forums's words but her answer to your question made my hair on my neck stand up.

 

Now, not saying a PA can replace a doctor in regards to the "finer" details, but usually and correct me if I wrong, a PA get into something they have an affinity for and should excel at "I hope". May be she went to one of those schools that don't require HCE?

 

I really hope this is not the case when I go to PA school, I definantly wanna learn on what to do in any situation given and not feel I have to do 2 more years of med school and a residency to achieave this.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Part of a being a solid practioner is to recognize your limits. Very strong PAs refer patients on to MDs on a regular basis. She decided she wanted to be the doc that got referred to.

 

As PAs we have to realize that we will NOT learn the same amount of information during our two years as docs learn in their 7. As a PA I think it is important that we continue to pursue further education for our whole career(the lifelong learner). This doc opted to take an academic approach versus an " on the job" approach. It has worked well for her.

 

You can't possibly learn what to do for every situation in just two years of formal education. The moment that you think you know something is the moment the unknown raises up and bites you squarely in the face.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Part of a being a solid practioner is to recognize your limits. Very strong PAs refer patients on to MDs on a regular basis. She decided she wanted to be the doc that got referred to.

 

As PAs we have to realize that we will NOT learn the same amount of information during our two years as docs learn in their 7. As a PA I think it is important that we continue to pursue further education for our whole career(the lifelong learner). This doc opted to take an academic approach versus an " on the job" approach. It has worked well for her.

 

You can't possibly learn what to do for every situation in just two years of formal education. The moment that you think you know something is the moment the unknown raises up and bites you squarely in the face.

Link to post
Share on other sites
....

You can't possibly learn what to do for every situation in just two years of formal education. The moment that you think you know something is the moment the unknown raises up and bites you squarely in the face.

 

Nor can you do this in a LIFETIME... so going on to MD/DO school won't help in that regard...

 

Even PHYSICIANS "refer" and seek consultation their entire career.

Link to post
Share on other sites
....

You can't possibly learn what to do for every situation in just two years of formal education. The moment that you think you know something is the moment the unknown raises up and bites you squarely in the face.

 

Nor can you do this in a LIFETIME... so going on to MD/DO school won't help in that regard...

 

Even PHYSICIANS "refer" and seek consultation their entire career.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree. This seems to be a huge misunderstanding for both PA students and medical students. I had a preceptor (MD) tell me recently -in a rather sarcastic tone- that the only way I would be expected to know everything was if I became a doctor. If that's the case why did I have to "suggest" to him that he not prescribe a diuretic for a patient who had recurring gouty attacks??

 

All medical professionals must realize that they will never know everything there is to know about medicine. If they did there would be no illness, no sickness, and no need for medical intervention as we know it today. More importantly, credentials don't equal competence. It never has and it never will. You can have degrees hanging on every wall in your office and be the most ignorant provider. Conversely, you can have no formal education and know how to interpret EKG's, treat DKA, and stage lung cancer. Reading and practically applying your knowledge are key.

 

The pace at which PAs learn medicine demands that we be perpetual students. We hit the ground running during our training then go straight into the workforce. This is why the first jobs we get are so important; they essentially are our "residency." This is where the real learning begins. but the learning doesn't stop there; it continues for a lifetime. The same applies for medical students and physicians, whether they admit it or not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree. This seems to be a huge misunderstanding for both PA students and medical students. I had a preceptor (MD) tell me recently -in a rather sarcastic tone- that the only way I would be expected to know everything was if I became a doctor. If that's the case why did I have to "suggest" to him that he not prescribe a diuretic for a patient who had recurring gouty attacks??

 

All medical professionals must realize that they will never know everything there is to know about medicine. If they did there would be no illness, no sickness, and no need for medical intervention as we know it today. More importantly, credentials don't equal competence. It never has and it never will. You can have degrees hanging on every wall in your office and be the most ignorant provider. Conversely, you can have no formal education and know how to interpret EKG's, treat DKA, and stage lung cancer. Reading and practically applying your knowledge are key.

 

The pace at which PAs learn medicine demands that we be perpetual students. We hit the ground running during our training then go straight into the workforce. This is why the first jobs we get are so important; they essentially are our "residency." This is where the real learning begins. but the learning doesn't stop there; it continues for a lifetime. The same applies for medical students and physicians, whether they admit it or not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More