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PA loses license PERMANENTLY


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The article reads well as far as lack of apparent skew and it is not a Fox News type of drivel.

 

Sounds like he made some poor decisions and it is going to cost him.

 

Lesson for all other PAs and hopefully not a dark mark on our profession.

 

Pain Management is a slippery slope type of practice and unfortunately usually run for profit.

 

Dang!

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good

 

 

He is an extreme outlier to medicine and PAs and he should be denied the privilege to practice medicine (he was not practicing medicine, he was a drug dealer)

 

 

I say  good riddance....  and all other providers (PA, MD, DO, NP) take note - you harm your patients by providing opiates with out guidelines, and get placed on warning, and still do it you deserve to be looking for another profession...

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There are flameouts in every field; doesn't matter whether it is MD, DO, PA, NP or Nursing. People find ways to get into trouble. We shouldn't be overly alarmed by these outliers. We would be better served to focus singularly on independent practice in a few states in the next five years.

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And just like our patients and every other service in life - people only tend to remember the bad and not the good.

 

The overwhelming majority of PAs are upstanding, bright folks who do what they do for a reason - good reasons and do it well.

 

The bad apple adage.

 

We just have to outlive the adage and perception and not let the bad news addiction become our reputation.

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good

 

 

He is an extreme outlier to medicine and PAs and he should be denied the privilege to practice medicine (he was not practicing medicine, he was a drug dealer)

 

 

I say  good riddance....  and all other providers (PA, MD, DO, NP) take note - you harm your patients by providing opiates with out guidelines, and get placed on warning, and still do it you deserve to be looking for another profession...

 

Yeah, I'd say that he got off pretty easy. People do serious jail time for over-prescribing narcs.

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Yeah, I'd say that he got off pretty easy. People do serious jail time for over-prescribing narcs.

In this case, they caught him, apparently before anyone died.  All the cases I'm familiar with where prescribers have gone to jail, people are dead who might otherwise still be alive if not for the dangerous narcotic prescribing.

 

Also, lot lower burden of proof to permanently revoke a professional license than convict someone of a crime.

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I liked the no prescribing more than 5 days from an ER or UC.  Not that I have personally seen anyone give more than 5 days or 20 pills, it would be nice if it was a rule/law.  No arguing, no explaining, it is the law. 

 

There are always those who make a profession look bad from priests to presidents to school teachers.  PA/NP/MD is not exempt.  I truly believe the 10% rule.  10% of any group is bad or completely incompetent to the point they look bad.  That 10% can be magnified if it is more publicized like police, politicians, and what not.  

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Just for kicks and giggles, I looked up all of my PA school classmates on Linkedin and Google. Most were locatable despite the fact that I haven't kept in touch with any of them. Three of them were interesting on looking up. One of the classmates who was not a very good student at all but did graduate and then got an MPH. She is a hospital administrator now. I don't think it hurts that she is very beautiful either. The other two, both guys, were very good students. One is now the "director of PAs at an emergency room." It sounded like a crappy job to me but perhaps it will help his resume to get to something that doesn't sound crappy. The other lost his license due to a medical board action. I won't name him here but the files are public so I read them. Apparently, he was in a romantic relationship with a patient and didn't end it. 

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In related new, Chris Clough has graduated from the Doctor of Nurse Practitioner program and was granted an unrestricted license to practice medicine. In his new position, he will be responsible for supervising subordinate PAs. (FYI....a joke)

Instead, Chris Clough should go PA school which provides far better training in the basic sciences and far more clinical hours which would make Chris Clough far more adept at charging an office visit for the sole purpose of dispensing opiates to whoever wants them.

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Just for kicks and giggles, I looked up all of my PA school classmates on Linkedin and Google. Most were locatable despite the fact that I haven't kept in touch with any of them. Three of them were interesting on looking up. One of the classmates who was not a very good student at all but did graduate and then got an MPH. She is a hospital administrator now. I don't think it hurts that she is very beautiful either. The other two, both guys, were very good students. One is now the "director of PAs at an emergency room." It sounded like a crappy job to me but perhaps it will help his resume to get to something that doesn't sound crappy. The other lost his license due to a medical board action. I won't name him here but the files are public so I read them. Apparently, he was in a romantic relationship with a patient and didn't end it. 

 

How were you able to tell that last part just by searching Linkedin and Google? Was it in the news or something?

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How were you able to tell that last part just by searching Linkedin and Google? Was it in the news or something?

I googled his name and yes, there was a headline story in the second item down from the top of the list. I don't see any value in putting his name here. I am just surprised. Although I wasn't a friend of his, he was a classmate for whom I had respect during school. He struck me as serious and purposeful. This outcome is a complete surprise and from my distant observation, uncharacteristic of the person I knew.  The details in the newspaper story led me to the state medical board. I google his name with the state medical board and there was a pdf file of all meeting minutes during his appearance and board action.

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I googled his name and yes, there was a headline story in the second item down from the top of the list. I don't see any value in putting his name here. I am just surprised. Although I wasn't a friend of his, he was a classmate for whom I had respect during school. He struck me as serious and purposeful. This outcome is a complete surprise and from my distant observation, uncharacteristic of the person I knew.  The details in the newspaper story led me to the state medical board. I google his name with the state medical board and there was a pdf file of all meeting minutes during his appearance and board action.

 

I'm not suggesting that you put his name here. I was just wondering how you discovered that information.

 

I have more than a few classmates that finished PA school and simply dropped off the map. Some of them, I was close with and they just disappeared (deleted social media accounts, etc). I've often wondered what became of them.

 

But, in the end, it's hard to know what's going on with people behind closed doors and it can be hard to predict what people will do if you don't them very well. I had similar opportunities to your classmate when I was in the military: I was lonely, isolated, and single. I had a few attractive female patients make fairly blatant advances on me. Many people encouraged me to go for it. I decided not to because the risk didn't justify the benefits. People were surprised since I was frequently in trouble in the military (I was a bit of a rebel). In contrast, there was a doctor that I worked with in the military that was completely straight edge. Never got in trouble and had a sterling reputation. He not only slept with one of his patients, but it was a weird situation where the husband watched. Feelings eventually got hurt and then all hell broke loose. He got into a lot of trouble.

 

So, yeah, it can be hard to predict a person's actions if you don't know them and their thought processes well.

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I'm not suggesting that you put his name here. I was just wondering how you discovered that information.

 

I have more than a few classmates that finished PA school and simply dropped off the map. Some of them, I was close with and they just disappeared (deleted social media accounts, etc). I've often wondered what became of them.

 

 

 

 

almost all medical and PAs typically post findings

 

just go to teh PA board state site and look for the link to verify a license....

 

then look for the meeting notes....

 

pretty simple..

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I bet the provider-patient romantic relationship thing happens more than we realize. It's too much of a temptation for some.

 

I knew a PA who dated a couple of former patients, but not until they were discharged from his care. Perfectly legal AFAIK.

 

Also there is a prominent pediatrician here in our area--a guy who is on bus stop ads, etc--who is under investigation for allegedly doing an ungloved genital exam on a teenage patient who was in for a common cold. You never know with these stories...could be true, could be fabricated or somewhere in between. Sucks for this guy because it was all over the news last night before he's even been convicted of anything!! His career in this city is over.

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not sure if trolling...but I was piling on the joke there...you know, the 100% online nursing degrees thing.  Perhaps the internet is not a safe space.

 

Trolling?  Since when is rebutting a factually inaccurate statement "trolling?"  You said "fixed it for you" in regard to a supposed "1-year 100% Online No Live clinicals required."  No such program exists, nor has such a program ever existed to my knowledge.  NP training involves 100% ON-GROUND training for the clinical component.  Either you were trying to be funny, or are just 100% wrong about how NP's are trained, or both. 

 

And on the "safe space" thing.  THAT I think is hilarious and I'm giving you a "like" on that. FWIW, I've not been a part of any cry-in's lately.  And I am a VERY happy person right now. ;)  

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I bet the provider-patient romantic relationship thing happens more than we realize. It's too much of a temptation for some.

 

I knew a PA who dated a couple of former patients, but not until they were discharged from his care. Perfectly legal AFAIK.

About 8-9 years ago, when I was still a pre-PA EMT, the state DOH tried to impose a 2 year horizon on romantic involvement between ANY licensed individuals and not just the patient, but significant family members as well.  That, of course, ended up not modifying any behavior that I was aware of, but did result in a bunch of EMT/Firefighters joking after a call about "starting the countdown" after a call with a patient's relative (usually daughter or granddaughter) whom someone found attractive.  I note that that specific proposal also clarified that you could still sleep with your own spouse if you had to treat him or her in an emergency situation.

 

I have no idea when it happened, but I haven't seen those specific, thoroughly delineated rules since getting back from PA school.  I think they quietly vanished like much other well-meaning but overly-specific bureaucratese should.

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