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Problem Based Learning (PBL)


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I actually have done a lot of research about PBL. I've gotten enough evidence to see why it is good. But I was asking this question for current or past students or people who have known people to go through this type of learning because there isn't much out there besides studies.

 

 

 

Thanks for stopping by though :)

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Pro - You aren't sitting in a classroom all day having your soul slowly sucked out via PowerPoint.

Pro - Lots of interaction with classmates

Pro - If you learn through interaction and discussion this is a great way to learn things in a holistic way.

 

Con - If you don't work well with others, this type of learning won't work out.

Con - It can be frustrating at times.  You are faced with things that you don't know and you have to research and find things out on your own.  If you want someone to just give you the information, you will struggle.

 

Basically it comes down to your personality and your learning styles.

 

2 side notes.  1)  You should be very aware of how PBL works before deciding to attend a PA school that utilizes that method.  If it's not a good fit, look at other schools that teach in a traditional way.  2) The member who commented above is a current student in a program that utilizes PBL (IBL). 

Thanks for stopping by.

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Pro - You aren't sitting in a classroom all day having your soul slowly sucked out via PowerPoint.

Pro - Lots of interaction with classmates

Pro - If you learn through interaction and discussion this is a great way to learn things in a holistic way.

 

Con - If you don't work well with others, this type of learning won't work out.

Con - It can be frustrating at times.  You are faced with things that you don't know and you have to research and find things out on your own.  If you want someone to just give you the information, you will struggle.

 

Basically it comes down to your personality and your learning styles.

 

2 side notes.  1)  You should be very aware of how PBL works before deciding to attend a PA school that utilizes that method.  If it's not a good fit, look at other schools that teach in a traditional way.  2) The member who commented above is a current student in a program that utilizes PBL (IBL). 

Thanks for stopping by.

 

 

 

Awesome thank you so much for your input. Are you currently in a PBL school? If so, How many days a week are you in it?

 

I do enjoy working with others and I enjoy the fact that I get lectures as well. So it is something I am nervous/excited about.

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I went to a traditional PA school, though we had PBL cases. I now teach at a mostly traditional school; our students get lots of cases, both inside and outside of our simulation lab.

 

As an old guy, I remember when “open classrooms” hit the scene in public school. Rather than just doing it when it makes sense, some schools (including my eldest son’s) did it for everything. Since he needed a quiet place to pay attention, it didn’t work for him. After a bit, new walls were built and It was the end of the experiment in our town.

 

There is a lot good to say about PBL. Given the volume of material a student needs to cover in his one didactic year, I don’t know what it would be like to try to do PBL for everything.

 

There is an old saying: if the only tool you have is a hammer, then every problem looks like a variant of a nail. When you interview (or go to informational sessions) ask how whatever techniques they use are integrated into the curriculum. If a school uses different techniques where they make sense, that’s great.

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I almost went to a school that only taught with PBL and was able to spend a couple days doing practice sessions to see if I'd like it.  Honestly I thought it was wonderful!  Its a great way to be learning in an active fashion and you are developing real critical thinking skills while learning textbook medicine... but I can see how certain learning styles might struggle with it.  I read up on several forum discussions on SDN (a lot more information there because there are many medical schools that have used it for a long time), and many people really do not like PBL, so to each his own.  I ended up shying away from it because I was worried that I wouldn't be able to learn without a structured and outlined approach, but I somewhat regret this decision.  I've worked with a few people who were trained by PBL and they all loved it and are really good at what they do. 

 

I did stumble upon a website that has several interactive PBL simulations that anyone can read/work through on their own time.  Might not be a bad idea for you to get a better sense of what it would be like, and whether you could see yourself learning in this fashion.  Check it out!  

 

http://sunnybrook.ca/education/content/?page=critical-care-pbl-elearning

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I almost went to a school that only taught with PBL and was able to spend a couple days doing practice sessions to see if I'd like it.  Honestly I thought it was wonderful!  Its a great way to be learning in an active fashion and you are developing real critical thinking skills while learning textbook medicine... but I can see how certain learning styles might struggle with it.  I read up on several forum discussions on SDN (a lot more information there because there are many medical schools that have used it for a long time), and many people really do not like PBL, so to each his own.  I ended up shying away from it because I was worried that I wouldn't be able to learn without a structured and outlined approach, but I somewhat regret this decision.  I've worked with a few people who were trained by PBL and they all loved it and are really good at what they do. 

 

I did stumble upon a website that has several interactive PBL simulations that anyone can read/work through on their own time.  Might not be a bad idea for you to get a better sense of what it would be like, and whether you could see yourself learning in this fashion.  Check it out!  

 

http://sunnybrook.ca/education/content/?page=critical-care-pbl-elearning

Did you graduate? How did you like the traditional style? 

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MB1234,

We have IBL on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday for 2 hours each day.  Outside of that we have traditional classes on Tuesday and Thursday or sometimes in the afternoon on M,W,F.  We also have hands on classes that teach how to perform exams or basic lab skills etc. 

I personally love the IBL method as it's an enjoyable way to interact with people who have a different thought process.  I find it much more enjoyable compared to powerpoint lectures, but each person is going to be different.

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university of Vermont med school is changing this year to a totally flipped classroom, no lectures at all, which means PBL or TBL of variants thereof. As a 30 year educator in PA and health professions education, I pretty much think lectures over 10 minutes should be banned unless they are given by a Nobel laureate. A large panel of medical educators recommended the same last year. Med students rarely even go to lectures, they used note takers in the past and now they are even more conveniently streamed.

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