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Wanted: Social Media Coordinator!

First Rounds is seeking a motivated PA student to serve as social media coordinator for 2016-2017. The position is a 1-year commitment with the option to extend the role for a second year. Duties include, but are not limited to:

 

1.     Consistently create engaging content for social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter

2.     Keep up-to-date with additional news and opportunities for PA students that are relevant to the FR audience

3.     Increase FR brand awareness to PA students and programs nationwide

4.     Possess outstanding written communication skills.

5.     Effectively utilize humor and wit while maintaining a professional tone in written content

6.     Commit to the role of assistant editor October 2016-2017.

7.     Be flexible with scheduling, be adaptable, and communicate effectively with the entire team

 

If you are a proactive, current PA student with a strong interest in social networking opportunities, please send a resume or CV with your name, PA program, graduation date, and a short summary of why you would be a great FR social media coordinator to FirstRoundsSubmission@gmail.com.  Please include 1-3 examples of your social media interactions.  The position includes an optional $400 reimbursement stipend to attend the 2017 AAPA Conference in Las Vegas.

 

 

Deadline for applications is September 30, 2016.

Interviews will be held at the beginning of October.  

 

Requirements:

1.     Must be a current PA student in good standing with an ARC-PA accredited PA program

2.     Must be a current member of AAPA

3.     The selected candidate must have at least one year remaining in school as of October 2016. (i.e. graduation date of October 2017 or later)

* Those with prior social media experience will be given preference, but it is not required. 

 

​Check out the original post on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/firstrounds/photos/a.459401247586706.1073741828.458562654337232/498591923667638/?type=3&theater

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