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I love about 90% of my job, don't hate coming into work everyday, and really like the people I work with. 

 

A few days ago a colleague of mine (classmate from PA school) who works in a suburb of the city where I live and work, called and basically asked if I wanted to come work for their practice who is expanding and adding new MD partners, subsequently looking to add another PA. It's sort of my dream job in terms of type of practice (general ortho/sports medicine with coverage of local athletic teams, lots of opportunity for OR time and different procedures, seemingly more autonomy than the sub-specialty I'm currently in). My background is in sports medicine/athletic training and my colleague thought I would be a good fit, so he contacted me.

 

Problem is, I wasn't even remotely looking for a new job. I've been at my current job for almost 2 years. The only thing I don't love about my current job is the compensation. It's a bit low in my opinion, but since I'm working for a big hospital/corporation it doesn't really allow for much salary flex. They basically offer what they offer and not much wiggle room. 

 

My question is: would simply meeting with the group that contacted me be a bad thing? Should I just say "no thanks" and be thankful for an enjoyable place to work, OR should I feel out my options and see what's out there? I feel like I'd be cutting myself short if I didn't at least talk/ meet with them and see what the position is about, but I also don't want to lead the other practice on and waste their time.

 

Thoughts? 

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Everyone is expected to look out for themselves, you included. If you see or hear about a position that you are interested in, there is nothing wrong -- and everything right -- about at least talking to another potential employer. Most people run their careers that way, rather than quitting a job and then looking for another.

 

From your note, it appears that the area of medicine is of interest and you have a friend there who will hopefully give you the straight scoop on what it's like to work there.

 

Go talk to them, meet the people, and then decide. It's nice to have more than one place be interested in you!

 

Good luck!

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Why in the world do you even feel guilty about this?  It's a job, not a marriage.  

Go meet with them, see if you like the team and see if you can pin down what the job would actually be like.  Then sit down and see if you would prefer that job over the current job.  If so, then you have the option of returning to management of current job and giving them a price that they can keep you.  If they want to match that price, then you stay, if not, then you walk into new job.  Just give the old job enough of a heads up that you're leaving to keep the doors open.  

 

Options are good.  More options are gooder.  

 

Best of luck to you!!

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I'm not a PA yet (start in August) but I am a recruiter. You are what we call a passive candidate, where you are not actively looking but willing to consider something that may come your way that interests you. When I am trying to pitch a job to a candidate I usually ask what would they change in their position that doesn't make them entirely happy. You already mentioned what you would like to change, payrate. Go ahead and meet with them, I feel you would do yourself a disservice by not meeting with them and seeing what is out there. Keep in mind that majority of open positions aren't on job boards. Job boards cost money to place an ad and staffing companies make large profits off employers for supplying employees.  Keep in mind that by meeting with them you are not committing to anything. 

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Everyone is expected to look out for themselves, you included. If you see or hear about a position that you are interested in, there is nothing wrong -- and everything right -- about at least talking to another potential employer. Most people run their careers that way, rather than quitting a job and then looking for another.

 

From your note, it appears that the area of medicine is of interest and you have a friend there who will hopefully give you the straight scoop on what it's like to work there.

 

Go talk to them, meet the people, and then decide. It's nice to have more than one place be interested in you!

 

Good luck!

Thank you for your input. I am leaning toward at least meeting with them to see what it's about. The WORST that could happen is I tell them "no thanks" in the end, right? 

 

I think I was just surprised that they contacted me without any prompting. Honored, to say the least, after being the one "job searching" in the past. This position is a much preferred position to be in, but still a little odd. I feel like I'm cheating on my current practice, that I love dearly. But geez, if they are going to offer 20k more a year or something crazy like that I feel like I would be doing myself a disservice not discussing. Thanks again!

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UGoLong said it well.  A larger question to ask might be why *wouldn't* you go talk to them?  To address your concern that you'd be wasting their time: you wouldn't be.  They're going to be hiring anyway, right?  So they'll be considering candidates and completing interviews.  All but one of those candidates and interviews will result in a "thanks but no thanks".  It's part of the hiring process to consider and talk to multiple candidates.  You're not wasting anyone's time.

 

If this sounds as good as you think it sounds you'd be foolish to not follow up.  Go for it.

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THANK YOU so much for your replies as well fflores98, dmdpac, and Boatswain2PA!  It makes me feel much better about meeting with them. I am somewhat of a "people pleaser" in my non-professional life, and I'm trying to break myself of that in a big way. This is just me looking out for me and my family - no one else will do that anyway, right? 

 

Love this site and forum option for professional advice. Thanks again, guys. I'll let you know how it goes! 

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It's been my experience that if you wait until you are actively dissatisfied with your current job, that only makes finding the next one more difficult. Plus, it makes it more likely you'll accept a position that isn't right for you, just because it's something different. We should all ABSOLUTELY be open to at least learning more about what opportunities are out there.

 

I'm about to transition to a whole new gig, and I honestly think most of the reason I did so well through a long interviewing process is that I didn't actually need to find a new job.

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It's been my experience that if you wait until you are actively dissatisfied with your current job, that only makes finding the next one more difficult. Plus, it makes it more likely you'll accept a position that isn't right for you, just because it's something different. We should all ABSOLUTELY be open to at least learning more about what opportunities are out there.

 

I'm about to transition to a whole new gig, and I honestly think most of the reason I did so well through a long interviewing process is that I didn't actually need to find a new job.

I agree with your last statement 100%. I find the entire interview process stress-free when I don't need a new job; I can relax, be myself, and tell them exactly what I want. If it works out--great. If not, it gives me more confidence going into my next interview.

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If your only concern at this point is that you find it 'odd' that they contacted you out of the blue...well, I think you need to get over that.  Several of the companies I've worked for ALWAYS ask for staff recommendations when a position opens prior to interviewing random people who apply.  Think about it - someone is already vouching for you, is putting their neck on the line saying 'yes, this person would be great here'.  It saves a company so much time in the vetting process.  This is not odd, this is networking.  Take advantage.

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Totally do it! I am six months into my new job as a new grad ER PA and I recently got begged by a plastic surgeon's office manager to interview at her office. I felt guilty but I did it. Although I wasn't interested and nothing came of it I am glad I considered it. You're a PA and you're a hot commodity!!!

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Thanks everybody! I did go meet with them and it went really well. Brand new building with room to grow. Also, they loved me. I even went in scrubs because it was the end of a work day for me, was last minute scheduled, and they totally didn't care. **Best interview attire EVER**

 

They said they definitely want me to join their practice, and even mentioned that they could more than match my current pay. I haven't gotten anything in writing so I haven't committed to anything. I'm basically just waiting and relaxing, knowing I've got options. Either way, if I don't like what they are offering, I can use the new offer to negotiate with my current employer. 

 

As Boatswain2PA said above: "Options are good.  More options are gooder." 

 

Thank you guys again for your help! 

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