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Hi. I was going to do the whole CNA training, but have a possible opportunity to do in home care for a man with a muscular degenerative disease who needs assistance with daily living.

 

Is this considered HCE?

 

Thanks!

 

 

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Mhm, but not very strong.

 

You want to do more than just ADLs;

  • EKGs
  • Vital signs
  • Injections/Medication Administration (SC, ID, IM, PO)
  • Phlebotomy
  • Pulmonary Function Testing
  • EMR Charting (assessing and documentation)
  • Nebulizer Treatments
  • Assisting w/ suturing (I&Ds too)
  • Ear lavages
  • Ordering labs

There are way more hands on things out there to experience. Pursue CNA and see if you can become an ER Tech

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Sorry to beat a dead horse but I just spoke to the patient yesterday about the job. This is the same kind of work as I'd be doing as a CNA. Moving him around, personal care, cleaning, feeding (he cant lift his arms), etc. Probably will administer medication too. Why isn't this HCE? I know it's not patient tech work but it is patient care. 

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Sorry to beat a dead horse but I just spoke to the patient yesterday about the job. This is the same kind of work as I'd be doing as a CNA. Moving him around, personal care, cleaning, feeding (he cant lift his arms), etc. Probably will administer medication too. Why isn't this HCE? I know it's not patient tech work but it is patient care. 

 

It's HCE, but its not a very strong one.

 

You want something that levels the playing field (current applicant pool). Remember, you're going up against Paramedics, EMT-Bs Corpsmen, RNs, ER Techs, FMGs, RRTs, etc. You want to list a strong experience.

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This is the HCE equivalent of a 3.0 GPA...it probably meets minimums but pales when compared to many other competitive applicants. You can make it work, but you'll probably need some other part of your application to really stand out.

 

For example, applicants with low GPAs might compensate with great HCE. With weak HCE, you'll need a top-notch GPA, LORs, PS, etc.

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What were your reasons for wanting to be a CNA? If CNA is what is avail. for you at this time, being that it is already low on the totem pole, I'd avoid home health as it is even less impressive. As a CNA in a SNF you'll have more exposure to a variety of conditions (CVA's, diabetic cx, etc) and also get a greater sense of teamwork.

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I think the problem that comes up with home health care is that you don't have a supervisor seeing what you do every day - there's no one to corroborate the tasks you do or skills you have.  A CNA working in an ALF or clinic or hospital has someone to oversee them and check their work.  I realize that's not a great answer, but I DO think that's why home health is not widely accepted PCE for PA school while official CNA jobs are.

 

Also, as someone else mentioned - you're basically doing ADL's....there's not a whole lot that is 'medical' about it.  So yes, you are actively interacting with the patient, but personal care/feeding/moving is also something some people just do for their elderly family members - no advanced knowledge required.

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What were your reasons for wanting to be a CNA? If CNA is what is avail. for you at this time, being that it is already low on the totem pole, I'd avoid home health as it is even less impressive. As a CNA in a SNF you'll have more exposure to a variety of conditions (CVA's, diabetic cx, etc) and also get a greater sense of teamwork.

I don't want to be a CNA but it is the simplest avenue to getting a job that is relative to this path, flexible in scheduling and will count toward HCE. (Though it's so expensive it's ridiculous). What is a SNF?

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When are you applying? I'd look into other options though CNA is not a bad start and like others have said make sure other parts of your app are outstanding. I was a CNA and ED scribe, have you considered scribing? Some programs may not consider scribing "hands on" but as far as learning medical term., observing PE findings, knowing which labs/scans to order for different conditions, transcribing medical decision making, it is an invaluable experience.

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I believe the reason experience in a hospital, or other medical facility, is more highly valued, is because you are working on a team. You will be collaborating with other healthcare professionals on an interdisciplinary team. You will also learn medical jargon/terminology (such as SNF) and experience how a hospital functions. You will have the opportunity to view procedures and work alongside RNs, PAs, MDs, lab techs, etc... All very valuable and applicable experience for PA school and for your future as a PA.

 

So to answer your question, adequate patient care experience should involve more than just one person. Use that CNA cert to get out there and get some great experience!!

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FYI I went to an open house and while the administrator did not agree that my MD supervised work as a social worker was HCE ([emoji849]) she said home healthcare was. Because "you take the person to the doctor and see what the doctor does." I was like.. Ok. I go to the doctor myself and see what the doctor does. That counts?

 

So.. Yeah.

 

 

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FYI I went to an open house and while the administrator did not agree that my MD supervised work as a social worker was HCE ([emoji849]) she said home healthcare was. Because "you take the person to the doctor and see what the doctor does." I was like.. Ok. I go to the doctor myself and see what the doctor does. That counts?

 

So.. Yeah.

 

 

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I agree that social work isn't HCE - just bc it something is supervised by an MD doesn't make it healthcare.  But I digress.

 

How often are you really taking your patient to the doctor?  If that's the only reason that makes it HCE...doesn't that seem pretty weak to you?

 

CNA isn't the 'fastest/easiest' route to HCE/PCE necessarily.  Unless you get confirmation from all the schools you want to apply to that your home health job is going to count as HCE AND PCE, you should really consider branching out.

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I dont think its stigma against mental health, more of a desire to delineate hands on clinical healthcare from other types of healthcare. PAs are primarily trained as clinicians, so they seek clinical experience from applicants.

 

While social work is an important aspect of healthcare, it is not inherantly clinical in nature.

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I dont think its stigma against mental health, more of a desire to delineate hands on clinical healthcare from other types of healthcare. PAs are primarily trained as clinicians, so they seek clinical experience from applicants.

 

While social work is an important aspect of healthcare, it is not inherantly clinical in nature.

 

^^ This.  As someone who wants to pursue psych as a PA, I'm definitely not stigmatizing mental health at all.  And perhaps that's what you did (were you trained/certified/educated as a social worker?  That may make a difference) but not all social work is diagnosing and treating mental illness.  It's kind of a broad term.  The point is - each school has the ability and prerogative to decide what they will count as HCE and PCE regardless of your (or my!) opinion.

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