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First Rounds - PA Professional's student news section - is now on Facebook! Like our page, then click see first and turn notifications on to stay up to date with the latest call for submissions as well as other upcoming opportunities.

 

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First Rounds

Published quarterly, First Rounds (FR) is PA Professional magazine’s student section written for PA students by PA students. Our mission is to expand student involvement outside of the classroom and foster additional opportunities and interests beyond medicine. We give students a voice and a place to share their experiences with current and future PAs and students.

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