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MMS versus MPAS degree


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There is no difference between the two. They are simply name preferences chosen by the institution. All PA programs are accredited by the same governing body, the curriculums have to be very similar in order to qualify. So, in the end, the only difference is what you see behind your name on the diploma. MPAS and MMSc are equally hirable, there is no distinction (as long as you have the -C ). What does matter is how well your program prepares you for the PANCE and clinical practice.

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Thank you for the response. That makes a lot more sense, so basically all established PA programs are accredited(or eventually become accredited) . Only thing I'm slightly unclear of is when the PA becomes certified from the NCCPA. I'm assuming that occurs after passing the PANCE?

Thank you!

 

When you graduate from your program you will have a Masters degree and you will be a Physician Assistant. That doesn't matter until you take the national board exam administered by the NCCPA called the PANCE. You can only sit for that exam if you have graduated from an accredited program. If you pass the PANCE then you will be a Certified Physician Assistant (PA-C), that means you qualify to practice medicine as a PA.

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Awesome. Yes, my drive to become a PA is immense. Although it took me 1.5 yrs to get into a couple programs. Thank you both for your help, it seriously means a lot, since It's very hard to be informed of these things without such forums(i.e people who care). I cannot wait till I become a PA, its honestly a really big dream of mine that is becoming reality! (as cheesy as that sounds!)

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agree with all the above. the degree you get doesn't matter( certificate, a.s., b.s., m.s., mms, mpas, mpap, mph, etc). what does matter is your ability to sit for and pass pance. some states have requirements regarding the level of degree but not the specific title. for example to practice and prescribe in Ohio(although why anyone would want to do that is beyond me) you need a masters degree, doesn't matter which one.

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agree with all the above. the degree you get doesn't matter( certificate, a.s., b.s., m.s., mms, mpas, mpap, mph, etc). what does matter is your ability to sit for and pass pance. some states have requirements regarding the level of degree but not the specific title. for example to practice and prescribe in Ohio(although why anyone would want to do that is beyond me) you need a masters degree, doesn't matter which one.

 

While I agree with that statement, I've heard from some individuals that B.S. degrees and lower are not as "competitive" as any Master's degree. That's what I've been told during my application process/interview process. I was always told to go for PA programs with Master's degrees as the BS is getting phased out slowly. Similar to how PAs who have been practicing for quite some time now have those degrees and went on to get a Masters? I don't know if I'm being misinformed, but when I look at the technicalities of hiring an individual with a BS-PA vs Ms-PA degree, wouldn't they prefer the MS applicant(not taking into account their performance & excellence). Conversely, a PA who has a BS and is excellent with patient care/ their duties would be preferred over a PA with an MS who is not as good with similar tasks. This is my take on it, I may be wrong.

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So, for a long time the degree you received really didn't matter as every program met the accreditation standards and that was your ticket to certification and practice. Now the accrediting body has mandated that all programs not currently conferring a master's degree do so by 2020. Given that, I guess if I had the choice, I would opt for the master's degree granting program today. That is not to say that the other programs aren't giving a great education but soon, they too will have joined the herd. Mooo

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When you graduate from your program you will have a Masters degree and you will be a Physician Assistant. That doesn't matter until you take the national board exam administered by the NCCPA called the PANCE. You can only sit for that exam if you have graduated from an accredited program. If you pass the PANCE then you will be a Certified Physician Assistant (PA-C), that means you qualify to practice medicine as a PA.

 

However, in many states, to you need to get your license (more hoops and money) before you can legally use the title "Physician Assistant" or "PA-C." Then your job may require you to be credentialed. Again, more hoops and paperwork. It potentially could be months after graduation before you are earning PA salary, so plan accordingly.

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I'm not really worried about becoming certified as that shouldn't be an issue, what I'm more concerned about is graduating with a competitive degree (if that makes any sense). Okay, so MMS in Physician Assistant Studies or a MPAS both are "Masters degree's in Physician Assistant Studies" correct? So, I should be okay regardless of MMS or MPAS. (sorry if this is getting repetitive, I just want to be reassured).

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I'm not really worried about becoming certified as that shouldn't be an issue, what I'm more concerned about is graduating with a competitive degree (if that makes any sense). Okay, so MMS in Physician Assistant Studies or a MPAS both are "Masters degree's in Physician Assistant Studies" correct? So, I should be okay regardless of MMS or MPAS. (sorry if this is getting repetitive, I just want to be reassured).

 

Yes, there is no difference between MMS and MPAS.

 

Just like how you will see some dentists with DDS and some with DMD, the only difference is the name of the degree.

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  • 1 year later...

Hi everyone,

I have a question: I got accepted to Samuel Meritts PA program which is a masters degree, is 27 months and is $80,000. I also got accepted to STANFORD University which is an AA degree but offers an MMS degree as well, its 21 months and is $50,000 ($60,00 including the MMS degree) I am having a hard time deciding on which program to choose. HELP!!!! My concern is the degree, I feel I should have a masters, but people are saying as long as you pass your boards the degree does not matter. I have also heard that in the year 2020 all PA programs will be required to be a masters degree level.

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If you feel that you should have a Masters, then it doesn't matter which program you go to (as far as degrees go) because you can get one from both. You are correct that in 2020 PA programs will be required to be Masters degree granting, so you will probably want to get it anyways, whether you get it now or later. I don't really understand your question though, since both programs offer the Masters. Just pick whichever you like the most, and get the Masters wherever you go.

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If you feel that you should have a Masters, then it doesn't matter which program you go to (as far as degrees go) because you can get one from both. You are correct that in 2020 PA programs will be required to be Masters degree granting, so you will probably want to get it anyways, whether you get it now or later. I don't really understand your question though, since both programs offer the Masters. Just pick whichever you like the most, and get the Masters wherever you go.

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Let me rephrase: Samuel Meritt offers a MPAS degree after 27 months. Stanford offers an Associates degree, but we have the option to complete an MMS degree during your clinical years. So my question is: Is there a difference between an MMS degree and MPAS degree?

I know hospitals like Kaiser require PAs to have a masters degree so does an MMS degree fulfill that requirement?

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Let me rephrase: Samuel Meritt offers a MPAS degree after 27 months. Stanford offers an Associates degree, but we have the option to complete an MMS degree during your clinical years. So my question is: Is there a difference between an MMS degree and MPAS degree?

I know hospitals like Kaiser require PAs to have a masters degree so does an MMS degree fulfill that requirement?

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Let me rephrase: Samuel Meritt offers a MPAS degree after 27 months. Stanford offers an Associates degree, but we have the option to complete an MMS degree during your clinical years. So my question is: Is there a difference between an MMS degree and MPAS degree?

I know hospitals like Kaiser require PAs to have a masters degree so does an MMS degree fulfill that requirement?

 

MMS = Master's of Medical Sciences

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Let me rephrase: Samuel Meritt offers a MPAS degree after 27 months. Stanford offers an Associates degree, but we have the option to complete an MMS degree during your clinical years. So my question is: Is there a difference between an MMS degree and MPAS degree?

I know hospitals like Kaiser require PAs to have a masters degree so does an MMS degree fulfill that requirement?

 

MMS = Master's of Medical Sciences

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