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John Hopkins Independent Study / PA program

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Hello everyone, 

 

 I am aware that Hopkins has a residency program for PAs but not an actually program for to obtain a Master's degree. But have been told by a practicing PA is it possible to list as an independent study under their NP masters program.Has anyone gone this route or was aware of this route? 

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Sounds impossible. If JH isn't accredited by ARC, they shouldn't be graduating PAs/students shouldn't be able to sit for PANCE.  Did this PA graduate recently?

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No, she didn't graduate recently. I believe she's been practicing for over 5 years.  I was surprised too since its not an approved program. But, she told me it was apart of NP primary care master's program but that her classes were med classes vs NP classes and she was able to take her boards and hasn't run into any issues regarding it. I was just very surprised when she told me. 

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sounds like she is an np, not a pa...to take the nccpa pa boards you need to graduate from a real program. no way around that. hard stop. period.

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Sounds like this person is either confused about her credentials or is falsely advertising herself.  Taking med classes as part of an NP program does NOT equal being a PA.  Something is fishy.

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Yeah, as I read more into I wasn't totally convinced either. And I did actually look her up before starting and she went to King's college which she told me and then transferred over to JH. I'm not sure how the independent study works at JH and how could only 1 student be apart this program and come out as a PA. When I asked her how she applied, she said she contacted the administrative department for that program and told them she wanted to be a PA and they listed her as an independent study after she transferred..no idea how that could even work. 

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it doesn't work that way...." hello, Harvard university? I'm at brakebills university PA program but I want to transfer to your university and finish an independent studies degree in pa studies, is that ok? "

nope.

maybe mph or mba postgrad at Hopkins.

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that's like this:

some dude says: " I studied at Harvard"

what that actually means : "they have a cool quad and I read stuff there once for a community college night school class I was taking on brewing beer in your sink"

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If you know her name, you could probably look up her license info at a Maryland government site.

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

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You can also look her up at NCCPA.  Many many years ago Johns Hopkins had a program and who know what special arrangements they might have made way back when, but that was in the 1970s.  

 

The NCCPA also let people grandfather in as late as the late 1970s.     The late Ron Nelson, AAPA President about a decade ago, grandfathered in and certified.  He was proud of it and Michigan was proud of him as a PA.    Michigan was one of the few states the grandfathered PAs could be licensed in.  Vermont was another.   There is also a pretty famous grandfathered in PA in NY but I will not give the name here.  

 

California also grandfathered in PAs who were trained in their Women's Health Specialist Health Manpower Pilot project training programs at UCLA, a free clinic in Sacramento, and the Humboldt Open Door Clinic.  First they were licensed as women's health PAs in California and then as regular PAs since the special license category went away.   There are three or four of these folks still practicing or they were when I last looked.   A number of others went through other formal programs subsequently.  One of my colleagues in the Sacramento clinic program went on to be a neurosurgeon! I went through one of that program in 1976-1978 (the Sacto free clinic)  prior to going through the  formal Stanford Primary Care Associate Program and then becoming NCCPA certified.  One of the interesting things is that we could prescribe then, about 15 years prior to other PAs in California, through a special health manpower pilot project, although that ended in the early 1980s..  

 

If you are licensed in one state you can become licensed in another "by endorsement" sometimes.  

 

Things were much different early on so I am just giving a historical perspective, as one of the few dinosaurs old enough to do so.   Medicine in 1976, and practice as a PA, was as different from today as night and day.  

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