Jump to content
123

Are longer PA programs better than shorter ones?

Recommended Posts

Here in Texas the programs range from 24-34 months. Just wondering why exactly some programs are so much longer. Longer holiday breaks? Classes more spread out? I'm thinking about doing an EM residency so I would want to start that as soon as I can; just not sure if I get accepted into a more "prestigious" PA program if I should go there or one that is shorter but less "prestigious". Thanks for your help guys, I really appreciate it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It varies by program for many reasons.  Some may have longer breaks but from what I can tell, often longer programs means a longer clinical year with either longer rotations or more elective rotations.  You'd really have to look at the curriculum for the programs you are considering to see where the length comes from.  24 months is the shortest program I've seen and I think the average is 27-28 months or something.  The difference between 24 and 27/28 is negligible in my mind.  24 vs 34 is essentially an extra year and unless the program is promoted as a 3 year program (Colorado does this and has beneficial reasons, IMO) I can't imagine 10 extra months when I could do the same thing in less time. It's all personal preference but I wouldn't pick a program with length as a serious deciding factor (PANCE pass, availability of rotations, etc are much more important).

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

some programs spread the material out more, which is nice. others have a more significant research component, which is not ideal if you are training a clinician as opposed to an academic researcher...some of the dual PA/MPH programs are also longer as they cover more material. If you have any interest in public health, a PA/MPH program is a nice option. also makes it easier to continue on to a doctoral program in public health (DrPH) if you so desire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a Texas resident as well, and I do wonder why UNT is significantly longer than all the other programs.

 

I think they place strong emphasis on primary care, could that be the reason?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took a look at the curriculum and it seems to be mostly longer clinical times. Some program's didactic year include more classes. Assuming PANCE rates, rotation quality, etc. between 2 schools are equal, would more rotations and classes significantly make me a better PA coming out of school?  Or would working an actual job sooner help me become a good PA faster? 

 

Kwame E, UNT has more of a summer break (only 8 hours of classes while other schools I looked at have 18-20). Also they seem to take more classes before clinicals. Clinicals themselves are only 48 hours which doesn't seem to be that much longer than others.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More