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I am looking for a good pediatric critical care reference text.  I've heard that the big three are
·         Fuhrman and Zimmerman. Pediatric Critical Care. 4th Edition. 2011

·         Shaffner and Nichols. Rogers' Textbook of Pediatric Intensive Care. 5th Edition. 2015.

·         Wheeler, Wong, and Shanley. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Basic Science and Clinical Evidence. 2007.

 

My question is.. I have no way to go see any of these texts in person.  Anyone have any good comparisons on the three texts?  I would be learning more toward Roger's just because its the most current - however I'm not sure if that is a good enough reason. 

 

I'll be using it just as a reference for understanding the sick kiddos I'm taking care of, but I'll be working in Neurosurgery.

 

 

Any opinions would be much appreciated. 

 

Happy Holidays! 

 

 

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you can probably read sections of each on amazon to see which best fits your style. if you go to a medical school bookstore or library you could compare the same section(pick a dx) for each and see which flows best for you. I did this when looking for a medicine text and realized Cecil's was a far better writing style for me than harrison's with better tables and language aimed at the non-internist.

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