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Was just a question. Were not dangerous or controlled meds. I am talking about antibiotics. Yes maintained records (Fyi a text message or email stating all allergies and med history etc does count as written documentation). Yes discussed with supervising doc who firmly trusted my medical decision making. I was simply unsure if right now between last day in FP and upcoming start date in specialty if it was allowed. Apparently that was a 'stupid' question in your opinions. Thanks for making that clear guys. I'd hate to see how judgemental the respondents can be when a patient asks a question you don't approve of. FYI, this should not be a place for competitive and reprimanding responses. I would like to think we all got in this for helping others.

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Without being too tacky, under what legal authority would you base your decision on allowing yourself to write for a prescriptive medication? I'm not sure how one would feel comfortable prescribing any dangerous or controlled medication without knowing the specific laws pertaining to such in your state of residence. Based on comments from a coworker from earlier this year this does not seem to be an uncommon question. Regardless of how independent we would like to see ourselves, we are still required to function under the authority of a supervising physician. At present time you do not have such an arrangement. The short answer? You cannot prescribe medications. In my state, unless you have a "reasonable" expectation of this being a practice patient, it is illegal for you to do so. Even with a supervising physician.

 

 

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When you called in meds for friends in the past, how were the medical records for that encounter generated and maintained?  If they weren't, odds are what you were doing was never appropriate in the first place.  Now, if you do it without an SP at all, it would be outright illegal.

 

So if your friend has a UTI and you call in some Bactrim for her, what happens if she gets SJS?  How, absent any charting, are you going to document that she told you she had no sulfa drug allergy?

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At least 2 PAs in Washington have been cited by the state board for rx'ing with no records or for family members. One was an inhaler and one was abx. They both had active licenses with active employment and a designated SP.

 

If between jobs without an active practice plan - you have no rights to practice medicine. It is quite simple.

 

If folks here were harsh - well - duh. They saw poor judgment and spoke up because, quite frankly, you ASKED.

 

So, take the lumps from your professional PEERS and learn something.

 

The old saying goes - if something makes you stop and question - there is likely a problem.

 

We, as PAs without independence have to be especially careful and walk the straight and narrow. If we want change then we have to be above board at all times and walk the straight and narrow to prove without regret our intelligence, integrity, and capacity for responsibility.

 

If you do something dumb - at least own it and make changes. I am not hearing regret or acceptance of your gaff......

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It's also very tacky to edit your original post to remove the original question, rather than replying in the thread later so that people can still see what you originally asked.  While you may not have liked the answers you got, a) they're pseudonymous, and b) someone else probably has the same question, and now you've limited others' ability to learn from the feedback you received.

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FYI, for those who may be unaware, "dangerous drugs" are prescriptive medications that are not listed as controlled. Antibiotics are an example of a "dangerous drug". These items should be specifically stated/defined in state regulations. For my own education, if you are no longer under your SP in an employment capacity (between jobs), how could you document the interaction in the patient's record?

 

 

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