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One Thing You Can't Live Without in PA School


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Do you have a story about something you can't live without in PA school? Want your article to be published in First Rounds, PA Professional's student news section???

In less than 600 words - write about the "One Thing You Can't Live Without in PA School" to an audience of PA/pre-PA students. Personally captured photos from your experience are encouraged!
To submit an article, proposal, or for more information please contact First Rounds editor Jessica Treiber at jessica.treiber@my.mcphs.edu by October 4th to start the process.
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Your classmates. Your all on this crazy train together and at one time or another you'll need support as you all are getting blasted with so much information that it will be coming out of your ears. Coffee and sleep are probably at the top though. Oh and a sense of humor.

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I agree with some of these posts:

 

I always make sure I get minimum of 7 hours of sleep and always at least a full 8 hours of sleep before a test. Friday nights are date night with my boyfriend and I, so absolutely no studying and spending quality time together. Food prepping is huge too in order to eat healthy and save money. 

 

So I know that was more than one thing, so to sum it all up, I'd have to say I couldn't live without still living my life the way I want to and making long run decisions that will make me happy. Making sure I still make time for the things and people I love and always making sure to take care of myself. 

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Love. But if it is the one thing you can’t live without, why are we so afraid of it in medicine – a field that sustains life? Doctors seldom use the word at work. In fact, we are taught in school, as I’m sure most of us were, that a solid professional boundary between provider and patient is critical. If you lose that boundary, dangerous things happen. We are not to accept gifts from our patients. We block our home and cell phone numbers when we call them, and we seldom give out our pager numbers.  So, I ask again, why are we so afraid of it in medicine – a field that sustains life?

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In all honesty my MacBook Pro. I'm not one of those big apple guys but the MacBook is a lifesaver. The students in my class that don't have Macs have, in 100% seriousness, all had problems with their computers. It just goes so quickly and syncs well with the iPhone and iPad. It's great

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Love. But if it is the one thing you can’t live without, why are we so afraid of it in medicine – a field that sustains life? Doctors seldom use the word at work. In fact, we are taught in school, as I’m sure most of us were, that a solid professional boundary between provider and patient is critical. If you lose that boundary, dangerous things happen. We are not to accept gifts from our patients. We block our home and cell phone numbers when we call them, and we seldom give out our pager numbers. So, I ask again, why are we so afraid of it in medicine – a field that sustains life?

We aren't afraid of it, but as naturally empathetic creatures we have to tone it down. Otherwise we would be severely dysfunctional with the amount suffering we see daily. We would be depressed, burned out, and unable to maintain objectivity. Likely working up every cough for cancer. This is not to say that some aren't taking it too far. At some point during burn out, we realize that the source of our troubles stems from patients, and we become cynical as a improper coping mechanism. However, studies have shown that empathy science training (not empathy training because it's shown you usually have it or don't) that demonstrates how we evolved to be empathetic creatures and how empathy actually improves objective outcomes, does have impact on patient satisfaction and provider satisfaction. (Thank you Primary Care RAP empathy lecture for that tid bit of info)

 

As far as not giving out numbers, I have and still do this. I'm very selective and I do not judge others who don't because I've experienced first hand people take advantage of this and will run you into the ground assuming you are their personally concierge. I don't expect to be paid for every interaction, but I do expect respect for boundaries. Love has nothing to do with wanting work life from home life. One might argue that is love for our families that we don't invite work to be apart of our every waking hour. We don't accept gifts because it's against rules at many places of employment.

 

#4 The patient is the one with the disease.

 

#8 they can always hurt you more.

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I don't get enough sleep, I rarely take Friday nights off, I try to work out when I can, and I rely heavily on the friends I've made in school. But if I had to choose one thing that gets me through this, it's family. I couldn't do it without the support of my wife and my parents. I'd be on my way out the door if it wasn't for their support, guidance, encouragement, love, all of it ...But I'm not going to write an essay on it. Lol.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Google docs: For each module we'd make a table with the conditions, risk factors, presentation, treatment, etc. Share it with a few of your classmates and all of you work on it during lecture. Since the work is split up across so many, you get a good amount of listening time but still get a handy table at the end of class.

 

Other students made flashcards on quizlet and shared them with the class.

 

Whatever you can do to minimize redundant grunt work

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Agreed with PA chick above. Another thing that helps me majorly in PA school is exercise with a group of students literally every day after class.  The group I study with will go do some type of physical activity every single day after the last lecture for at least 30 minutes to an hour.  This includes working out, football, softball, volleyball, basketball, ultimate frisbee, running trails, etc.  It is a great stress reliever and lets you burn off some steam after sitting in lecture all day.  After that we down some water and then hit the books for a couple of hours.  We've done this every day the past two semesters and are all doing pretty well. 

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